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Full text of "Reports of Naturalist Division, Yellowstone National Park"



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/reportsofnaturalunse_7 



10-23 

(Rev. Sept. 1960) 






UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

(Park or Office) 




O -n 

70 F 

oi m 

c 

H CD 

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70 



YELLOWSTCKf 

NATIONAL PAk.\ 

LIBRARY 



PLEASE RETURN THIS FILE PROMPTLY TO 



MONTHLY REFORTS, NATURALIST DIVISION 



1955 



(Act/'vify) 



IMPORTANT 

This file constitutes a part of the official records of the 
National Park Service and should not be separated or papers 
withdrawn without express authority of the official in charge. 

Officials and employees will be held responsible for 
failure to observe these rules, which are necessary to pro- 
tect the integrity of the official records. 



FROM: 


TO: 


(Date) 






(Date) 


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; « 9 5 



Superintendent, Yellowstone February 21, 19$$ 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly report, InterpretiTe Division January 

special Activities and Conferences 

The Chief Park Naturalist conferred with Frank JIattson on January 12 
concerning the Canyon development and discussed the interpretive facilities 
which should be included in the amphitheater and combined museum and adminis- 
tration building. 

On January lU esti ates were prepared and submitted to the Administra- 
tive Officer for the funds needed for the Interpretive Division for the 19£6 
fiscal year. 

On January 13 the Chief Park Naturalist attended a conference in the 
Conference Room on Project Construction Plans and Master Plan development. 
frank Mattson presented most of the material at the conference. 

Superintendent E. F. Luce, Custer Battlefield National Monument^ was 
in the Chief Park Naturalist's office for a short conference on matters of 
mutual interest on problems of museum and Interpretive Division matters on 
January 18 Q 

Park Naturalist David Beal attended the Staff Meeting held on 
January 28 in the absence of the Chief Park Naturalist. At this time the VJork 
Load Study was reviewed. 

Religious Services and Chapel Use 

The regular Sunday School services were held in the Yellowstone 
Park Chapel each Sunday morning at 10:00 a.m. during the month of January. 
Church services were not held on January 2, but were held in the Chapel each 
Sunday at lljOO a.m. during the balance of the month. On January 9 a special 
communion service was conducted by the Rev. arren W. Ost, who visited Yellow- 
stone the early part of January. At this same service, the Rev. Mr. Ost baptize: 
Sara Lee Moore, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Moore of Yellowstone 
Park, and Susan Parkes, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Parke s of Yellowstone 
Park. 

The Rev. Warren W. Ost, who is Director of the Student Ministry in 
the National Parks, arrived in Yellowstone on January 7 and spent considerable 
time in conference with park officials on the student ministry program. He 
conducted the special services at Mammoth and one at Gardiner on Sunday evening 
and left Yellows to re Park on January 10, 



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In-Service Training 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon reviewed with Park Naturalist Seal 
operational details of the public address units, 3ell and Howell make sound 
motion picture projectors, the Neuvator film cleaning equipment, and other 
such units as are used by the Interpretive division. Some time was also 
devoted to reviewing with Mr, Beal other facilities which the Division has 
at its disposal. 

The Yellowstone weekly Newsletter was mimeographed and distributed 
bv Mrs, Moore, Clerk-Stenographer in the Division, 

Some correspondence was carried on with the Wyoming Highway Depart- 
ment for the purpose of obtaining from them in-service training material to 
use as part of the in-service training of park highway personnel. 

Park Naturalists Condon and Beal reviewed with interest Mr, Parker's 
paper on "History in Scenic and Scientific Parks", 

Interpretive fjervices 

A 16mm motion picture was sent to Mr, John S, Garth of the University 
of Southern California, Unfortunately, this film arrived too late for their 
use at a specially scheduled program. The film was shipped from Gardiner via 
express collect on January {? for a program to be given the evening of January 
11, Failure of this picture to arrive at its destination is indicative of the 
difficulty encountered in the transportation schedules from Yellowstone Park, 

A set of 50 - 3£mra kodaslides was sent on loan to the Great Smoky 
Mountains National Park for use in a public relations program which they are 
carrying on in communities adjacent to that park. 

Park Naturalist Condon presented a program, using 35>mm kodaslides 
as illustrative material, to a Young People's Group at St. Andrew's Episc 
Church in Livingston on January 16, There were 28 persons in attendance. 

The Annual Statistical Report on the Interpretive Services rendered 
to the Public during 19£U was prepared and submitted to the Director's office. 

The WILD ANIMAL HEAVEN 16mm motion picture was on loan to Scotts 
Bluff National Monument during the month, and it was reported that it was shown 
to some 200 persons in the Scotts Bluff area tap Superintendent Anderson, 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon traveled to Billings on January 27 
where he presented a program that evening to t tie Annual Ladies Night Banquet 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers, The WILD ANIMAL HEAVEN 16mm motion 
picture was used for the program. There were 108 persons present at the meeting, 

Park Naturalist Beal presented a program of movies on Everglades 
National Park to the Boy Scout group at Mammoth on January 20, 

During the month Park Naturalist Beal refurbished 8 signs which were 
used in publicizing the interpretive program during the travel season, 

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Museum Activities and Exhibits 

On January !? the completed exhibit plans for the West Yellowstone 
Information Station were assembled and transmitted to the Regional office for 
review and submission to the Museum Branch. The balance of the exhibit plans 
for the Old Faithful Museum exhibit revisions were completed and these were 
transmitted to the Regional office for review and submission to the Director's 
office. 

On January 11 the Chief Park Naturalist reviewed with resident Land- 
scape Architect Mattson the information required for the revision of the con- 
struction plans for the project of museum expansion. 

Park Naturalist 3eal spent three days on museum accession work and 
filing. He devoted 8 days to rearranging specimens in rooas 3 and k and in 
treating all biological specimens with insecticides to protect them from vermin. 

A new hardwood top of maple was plaeed on the museum workshop bench 
by Park Naturalist Seal, and a special mount installed for the vise used on 
this workshop bench. 

Personnel 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month except 8 hours 
annual leave taken on January 3» and k hours dental leave taken on January 5. 
Park Naturalist Beal was on duty all month, and Clerk-Stenographer Moore >?as 
on duty all month except for 16 hours sick leave taken on January 19 and 20. 

The selection was made of Mr. .toman B. Berkenham for the position 
of Park Naturalist, GS-9, to replace Mr. W. Verde Watson, who transferred to 
Cape Hatteraa National Seashore Park, This selection was made on January It, at 
which time Mr. Herkenhara was advised, and it was determined that he would enter 
on the Yellowstone Park payroll as of February 13* It is expected that he 
will arrive in Mammoth on February l£ or 16. He was sent detailed information 
on the Job which he is to fill, and given information on housing and other 
details which would be helpful to him in planning his move here. 

Lesearch and Observation 

Park Naturalists :'3eal and Condon spent the morning of January 1° 
in the Stevens Creek area observing attempts at antelope trapping and were 
hopeful of obtaining pictures which would be useful in the interpretive work. 
This trapping venture was unsuccessful, and no further attempts were made to 
obtain pictures of this t„pe. 

The Reports on Research Priori ty and the Research Projects in progress 
in Yellowstone Park were prepared during the month with a total of Uo active 
or proposed research projects being listed in the reports. 

Mr. Frederick 3. Turner's paper on Reptiles and Amphibians is in the 
final copying stage, preparatory to submission to the printer for publication. 
Mr. Watson* s report on the Norris Geyser Basin has been started, but not a 
Treat deal accomplished on this project as yet. Mr. Frank Mattson ted 
the drafting details on the Norris Geyser Basin map. 

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Library 

Two 1260 foot reels of magnetic tape were placed in the Library 
for permanent storage because of their historic significance and Liiportance . 

Natural History Association 

The Association has arranged with Mr, William Henning to work in the 
dark room and do some printing of 8 x 10 glossy enlargements for the park's 
use. These prints are to be sent to interested parties who make requests to 
Yellowstone Park for certain types of illustrative materials. Mr. terming 
has been unable to accomplish much on the project in January, but it is hoped 
he will be able to accomplish much during the month of February. 

Mrs. Alice Quist worked only a few hours as clerk of the Association 
during the month of January. 

The Yellowstone Library and 'useum Association paid for the duplication 
of two copies of a 225 foot reel of 16mm colored motion picture film on the 
Geyser Basins in New Zealand. This film was made available for duplication 
by Superintendent Francis Oberhansley of Grand Teton National Park. The film 
was returned to Mr. Oberhansley on January 11. 

Copies of the Annual Report of the Yellowstone Library and Museum 
Association were submitted by the Association's Executive Secretary on January 
lU to the Superintendent for transmission to the offices of the Director and 
Regional Director. 

The Association is financing a pamphlet for distribution to the 
wildlife Caravan groups duri.-g the summer at Mammoth. This material was 
reviewed on January 17 and sent to Mr. Wallace Good, who is arranging for the 
printing of this pamphlet in Kansas City. 



Library, 



The Association purchased 8 books for the Yellowstone Park ^search 



During the month, several mail orders were received for publications, 
and these were filled b, the Association. 

A careful review of all property acquisitions by the Association was 
made by Park Naturalist leaj., and a card inventory was made which covers all 
Association property and its purchase value. 

Equipment and Supplies 

All of the 16mm motion picture projectors were cleaned and serviced 
by Park Naturalist Deal. He also cleaned and checked the public address units 
and has prepared a list of service supplies wiiich will be needed to service 
this equipment for the 1955 season. These parts and supplies and an additional 
number of items will be ordered by the Yellowstone Library and Museum Association 
at a later date, so that all batteries and other essential parts will be fresh. 



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Photographic and Visual Aids 

A new drain was placed in the sink in the Dark Room on January 6 
by the Plumbing Division, 

The narration scripts for three of the movies were typed in roi 
draft form by Clerk-Stenographer Moore. 

Eight duplicate copies of a badger picture were received from former 
Park Naturalist Elmore on January 13. A set of 6 film strips prepared by Mr, 
John Haesler, Haesler Pictures, Amity Road, Woodbrldge, Connecticut, were re- 
viewed and found to be very fine presentations of information on National Park 
Service areas. The films reviewed were? "Tosemite National Park", "Yello - 
stone National Park", "Grand Canyon National Park", "Zion and Bryce Canyon 
National Parks", "Mesa Verde National Park", and "Our National Park System". 
The pictures were of high quality, and the text and information accompanying 
them was well prepared. There were some typographical errors which were 
discovered and called to the attention of Mr. Haesler in a communication to 
him. 

The film supply for use by the Interpretive Division was purchased 
from the Storehouse. This film is for use in making 33>»»a kodaslvdes, 16mm 
motion pictures, and Uy$ negatives. 

Under the plan for distributing the best 35mm kodaslides available 
to the various National Parks which need them, we obtained a slide of beaver 
from Glacier, and we are having duplicate copies made for our use. Requests 
for duplicate slides have been received from Glacier and Rocky Mountain 
National Parks and duplicates are being prepared for them. 

Some 8 x 10 glossy enlargements were printed in the Dark Room and 
sent to the magazine CAR LIFE for their use in illustrating an article. 

During the month Park Maturali-st Seal assembled together on large 
reels 3,000 feet of colored motion picture film and readied it for critical 
review and editing. He inspected 21,717 feet of film, and reviewed an 
additional U,5>00 feet of film, checking the scene sequence and grading it 
as to quality. 

Respectfully yours, 



David de L, Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone March 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly report for February, 195>5« 

Special Activities and Conferences 

Park Naturalists Condon and Herkenham attended the Staff Meeting in 
the Conference Room on February 2k» At that tine Mr. Herkenham was introduced 
to those persons who had not yet made his acquaintance. 

At least one day or more was spent by each employee in the Inter- 
pretive Division working up the Work Load Study reports and coraple' r\ 
Load Studies. 

February 2U Mr. Milton ZiameAMB, Field Executive of the Boy Scouts 
of America from Billings, was in the Chief Park Naturalist's office and spent 
some time with Pa*k Naturalist Beal reviewing the scouting ja as it has 

been conducted in the past and is planned for the future. . 3eal is serving 
as Scxit Master for Troop 13>1, a post whica Park Naturalist .atson held for a 
number of years. Mr. Beal had the ft ts on a v?eek-end t: reek 

on the 26th and 27th, aad at that ti e conducted a number of nature study trips 
with the boys participate . 

On February 1 the report:: uere submitted on the Statement r 
Performed by Professional ;--. • Id Areas. 

Lr. Raymond SmaHey, a plsysician and surgeon in Billings, Montana, 
who is actively interested in conservatl on and especially in the National Parks 
and National Park program, was in r, .ef Park Naturalist's office on Feb- 

ruary 1, and at that tine spent several taunt discussing wildlife management 
and other facets of the National Park program with the Chief Pork ft 1st. 

Dr. Helmut 3uecliner of tate College was in the park from 

February 7 to lU, and during his stay here spent a great deal of his time in 
the Yellowstone Park Library and in the Chief Park Naturalist's . Or. 

Buechner is making an intensive study of the Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep. 

During the month a study was made of Division finances, and a plan 
worked out for the expenditure of funds for the balance of the \7;6 fiscal 
year. 

delicious : . rv Ltes and Chapel Use 

There were no special services held in the Yellowstone National Park 
Chapel during the month, but the regular -iuriday services were held. These 
consisted of Sunday School at 10:00 a.m. and the regular Service of Worship, 
conducted by the resident student minister, at 11:00 a.m. The Ch irs have 
been practicing regularly during the i and are preparing for faster. 



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-n-oervlce Training 

February 3 three movies portraying operations and natural resources 
in Glacier National Park were shown to employees and other members of the com- 
munity in the Canteen building. There were 131 persons present. These same 
movies were shown to lU men who work on the snow removal crews on February k. 

Several conferences were held with wm. Proper, R. • nson, and 

.ctin Superl utendent Hamilton concern t;; in-service training. 

Correspondence was prepared and sent to the Wyoming Highway Depart- 
ment seeking information on their training aids, and an order was placed for 
safe dr'.ving films to be used as a training aid in Yellowstone, These are 
expected to be made available early in March* 

Daring the Booth a total of several dsys time was devoted to t 
orientation sf Park Naturalist Herkenham on Ms job in Yellowstone, Mr, Hi rken- 
ham was introduced to members of the coiraaunity and the Superintendent's staff. 
He was shown the entire operating plant her*, and a great deal e was 
devoted to familarizing him with the Interpretive program, policies, and the 
physical plant U3ed by the Division, 

Interpr etive 3ervices 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon presented two programs during the month. 
A program was presented to the Annual Boy Scout Banquet at Livingston, Montana, 
on February 7, where there were more than 3^0 persons in attendance. This 
pfogum was held in the Elks Hall, .brucry 17 a program was presented 
to the Lions group at the Murray Hotel in Livingston, Montana, There were 
23 men present. On this day there was a severe storm which made travel very 
difficult between headquarters and Livingston, 

The I6asn motion picture HID ANIMAL Di was sent to seasonal Park 
Naturalist Clarence C, Alleman on February 18, and on this same date the novie 
QEYSERLAND was sent to Mr, Richard C, Berry in Denver, Colorado, 

Personnel 

Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month except for 2 hours 
annual leave on February 9, 2 hours on the 11th, and h hours on the It 
for a total of 8 hours. Park Naturalist Jeal was on duty all month, Clerk- 
Stenographer in na Moore was on duty all month except for one day of si 
leave on February 2 , 

Park Naturalist Norman B. Herkenham entered on the Yellowstone rolls 
as a Park Naturalist, G3-9, on February 13 and was in a travel status, arri-. 
in Yellowstone Park late on the evening of February 17, His household effects 
arrived on February 13, and Mr, Herkenham was able to report to the Headquarters 
Museum on February 21, 

Considerable time was spent by the Chief Park Naturalist workin 
information showing the seasonal Park Ran er Naturalists employed and the 

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stations to which they have been assigned during the past 10 years. The over- 
all personnel picture here shows a large number of repeat employments for 
seasonal help. 

On February 9 the Chief Park Naturalist received a long distance 
phone call from Mr, Harry V. Truman of Deudson University, Granvil 
Mr. Truman was under investigation by some Federal agency and was very much 
upset. It was not possible for us to provide Mr. Truman with any information 
c nceming the reasons for investigating him, and further information concerning 
this investigation has not been received here. 

vera! conferences were held during the month with the Personnel 
Office concerning the re-employment of seasonal help, especially laborers, and 
an attempt is being made to re-employ the personnel who have been employed in 
past seasons and given us satisfactory service. 

research and Observations 

Park Naturalist Beal made ■ trip to the Norris Geyser Basin on 
February 1 with District .ui ;ers R. Qriaa and T. Ela. On tds trip pictures 
were made of ranger activities in the winter time, such as measuring s 
course, shoveling buildings, and task patrol observ^t.'. • Mr. i>eal 

also spent approximately one hour in the SJorris Geyser Basin and was fortunate 
enough to see Constant, Dark Cavern, and Little Whirligig in eruption. 
arrived in t' ! Basin in time to se' eruption :. 

Geyser. The Ledge Geyser displayed .: fc deal of violent activity, but did 
not erupt. vai interest was the great amount of algae which was growing 
around the Black Growler Vent. 

B February 11 Park Naturalist Seal a: *f lark '..atur Condon 
made a trip to Pebble Creek and return. An American bald eagle was observed 
near the com'luence of the Lamar lives Soda jutte Creek, and at t is same 
point than were a few small stretches of open w&tor and lit water ouzels were 
observed in this small zone along the stream. In addition to tha water ouzels, 
there were Golden eye and Mallard ducks. Bison, coyotes, and elk were seen in 
numbers on the way from Mammoth out. A total of 12 different coyotes were 
seen on this day, hundreds of elk, and >od sized bunches of bison. 

Park Ranger Robert sharp called the Chief Park Naturalist's office 
on February 8 and reported an exotic bird seen within the boundaries oi the 
park near the East Entrance. Mr. Sharp had observed wild turkeys. Wild turkeys 
have been released by the Wyomin; ish and Game Department an the north fork of 
the Shoshone, and apparently some of the birds have moved on up-stream, two 
within the park boundaries. 

On February 2$ Park Naturalist Condon took Park Naturalist Herkenham 
to Cooke, Montana, and return for the purpose of acquainting him with the 
geography, geology, and biology of the northern section of the park, as much 
as was possible to do so in one day's tins* Elk were seen as far up Soda Butte 
Greek as the upper bridge below Abiati«ar lountainj a one-honned bison bull was 
observed near Soda Butte $ a pair of ;olden eye were seen near the confluence 
of the Lamar River and Soda Butte Creekj 15> coyotes were in sight in the 

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Lamar Valley near the Lamar elk trap, with many of there feeding on the carcass 
of an elk which apparently had been killed durin,:; trapping operations. There 
was very little snow in the Cooke area. 

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Books received 
Magazines received 15> 

Pamphlets received 18 

Books in circulation 1$ 

Books on indefinite loan 91 

Too .vjsearch Library was used extensively during the month b . 
Helmut Busehner In running down information on the Bighorn sheep herds, as 
they are found in Yellowstone. 

Natural History association 

During the month a number L orders for books were filled and 

several sales were nade to people stopping at the Museum. 

The manuscript on Reptiles and Amphibians by Frederick 3. Turner was 
sent to tlie Regional Director's office by the Association for review and trans- 
mission on to Edwards -ros., Lithoprinters • 

The Association purchased a 3i?mm motion picture film splicer which was 
received on February 12. This splicer was obtained so that we can proceed with 
the examination of the 35>mci motion picture film that we have n hand to determine 
which film we want to have 16mm cooies made of, and which film has no value and 
can be disposed of. 

The Association purchased two copies of the 16mm sound, colored 
motion picture GEYSER MELODIES by Guy D. Kaselton. These two reels of film 
were obtained at a cost of $170.00. 

The dummy copy of the January-February issue of Nature Notes was 
tnped. It was reviewed by the Editorial Board and will be published early in 
March. The Chief Park Naturalist prepared two articles for Nature Notes, one 
on the Black Dragon's Caldron, and one on Ouzel Birds. 

Equipment and Supplies 

A cupboard was obtained from the remodeling in Condon's house. It was 
placed in storage and it is planned to use it in seasonal Naturalist quarters. 
In addition to this, a bedsted was given to the Division by Al Bowman and several 
pieces of linoleum were obtained, and will be used in seasonal quarters. 

Photographic and Visual Aids 

Park Naturalist David Seal spent approximately 2/3' s of his working 
time on the l£ranr motion picture film library. Re has assembled ;inal 



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footage into partially edited reels on "BIRDS OF YELLOWSTONE, LARGE MAMMALS 
YELLOWSTONE, YELLOWS? NS IN WINTER, and a reel on the northern elk problem which 
is tentatively titled THEY ARE EATOiG. THEMSELVES TO DEATH. 

The Chief Park Naturalist spent considerable time with Park Naturalist 
Beal reviewing the proposed use of the y^ttm. black and white motion picture film, 
which is in storage. 

Park Naturalist Condon spent a good deal of time working on the 
manuscripts for the narratives to be used with the films, GENSERLAND, WILD ANIMAL 
HEAVEN, and GEYSERS, MUD POTS, AND HOT SPRMOS. 

Two kodaslides of the cow parsnip were loaned to Mr. Huntley Child. 

Respectfully submitted, 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park April , 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly report for March, l°f>5. 

Spoci.il Activities and Conferences 

The first two days of March were devoted to the completion of the 
'ork Tx>ad Study reports and the preparation of summaries covering them. They 
were submitted to the Administrative Officer on March 2, 

A memorandum was prepared and submitted to Acting Superintendent 
Hamilton covering various aspects of improvements which concessioners should 
make, and which should be considered when new concessioner contracts arc 
made up. 

Oka March 35 a conference was attended on the sign ins program which 
is to be used in the Canyon area. Landscape Architect Hattson, Park Engineer 
Wohlbrandt, and Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended this meeting, and at 
that time made a large number of correct! ns of inconsistences in the program 
as prepared. 

A conference was attended by Condon in Acting Superintendent's office 
on March 11 for the purpose of reviewing with Acting Superintendent Hamilton, 
Chief Ranger 3rown, Assistant Chief Ranger Edwards, and biologist Kit tarns, the 
elk management program, and to evolve a program for next year. 

)n that same afternoon a conference was held with respect to the 
west Yellowstone Information Station. 

On forth 17, Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a conference in 
Acting Superintendent Hamilton's office concerning the concession development, 
and at that time Chief Hanger Brown, Park Engineer wohlbrandt, Landscape 
Architect Mattson, and ?tr. Hamilton were present. 

Considerable time was given to the preparation of a gift book which 
was entitled "Bill */iggins Yellowstone Associations." This b sisted of 
a large number of 8 x 10 pictures of old friends and scenes which were intended 
to bring back memories of Bill wigglns* experiences in Yellowstone, and a large 
number of letters which were sent to Mr* Wiggins >fi his retirement. Park 
Naturalist Condon attended the Staff Meeting on 'larch 31 when this book was 
given to Mr. Wigging and made pictures of the presentation. 

A conference was held in Acting Superintendent Hamilton's office on 
March 2^ with Mattson, 'Srown, Joffe, and Hamilton present, to discuss the pro- 
posed trip to rJashington. 



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3n March 2k Mr, Rogers had a meeting in his office for the ;se 
of discussing and reviewing the proposed parkin:; areas along tlie roads at ole 
Cascades and Biscuit Basin, Matts >n, Brown, Hamilton, Joffe, and Condor, 
this meeti . 

Park Naturalist Seal represented the i/l vision at the Activities 
Conference held in the Acting Superintendents office on March 1. 

Field Scout Executive Gould stopped in at Headquarters Museum and 
conferred with Park Naturalist Beal concerning the Scouting program in Yellow- 
stone, on March 18. 

Considerable time was devoted toward the end of the month by c 
Park Naturalist Condon to assembling materials to take to Washington for refer 
use on his assignment there. 

:,eli.-: ■::-: Services and Chapel Use . 

The regular Sunday School services were held in the Yellow at ne Rati 
Park Chapel each Sunday at IOjOO a.m. These services were well attended by me - 
bers of the community. The Annual Sunday School Picnic was held at the Lamar 
Unit on March 5* There was a large crowd in attendance, lots of good picnic eats, 
and a bright clear day prevailed, Tho only detrimental feature was that it was 
very cold. 

The regular Church Services were held in the Yellowstone National Park 
hapel each Sunday momin at 11:0) a,m,, with student minister feu Bean 
presiding at all of the services, 

n- orvlce Training . 

A great deal of time was dven over during the month to orienting 
and training Park Naturalist Herkenham with respect to the interpretive Division 
program ana operation, Mr, Herkenham was shown three 1-hour movies dealing 
with Yellowstone on March 2, Park 'Naturalists Beal and Herkenham were ta 
all of the operational techniques and idiosyncrasies of the multllith, and on 
March h they ran off some 15,000 mastheads for the Yellowstone Weekly News . 

Clerk-Stenographer Moore, Park Naturalist 3eal, and Park Satura] 
Herkenham were each given a detailed memorandum outlining their job responsi- 
bilities in the Division, About 2 J days time on the 11th, 22m, ana 23rd was 
devoted to a careful and detailed review in conference with all three ->f them 
and Chief Park Naturalist Condon on the job responsibilibies of each, Fach 
of the members of the Division now has a mutual understanding of the others 1 
responsibilities in the over-all work program. 

As part of his training, Park Naturalist Herkenham carefully reviewed 
and edited the Master Plan Development Outline for the Interpretive Division 
of Yellowstone, 

B the evening of March 31 a ij hour movie on safe driving prec 
was shown to 76 members of the community in the Canteen building. 



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the evening of March 29, eight men from the Garage went to 
Livingston, Mon -ana, for a training session in ignition systems for motor 
vehicles. 

The Yellowstone Weekly News sheet was mimeographed and distributed 
by Clerk-S tenographer Moore. 

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Chief Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all monthj Park Naturalist 
Berkenha?n was oa duty all monthj Park Naturalist 3eal was on duty all monthj 
and Clerk -Stenographer Moore was on duty all month, except for one day of sick- 
leave on Moreh !• 

Dur the month resignations were received fron two *£ the Park 
Hanger Naturalists who had been placed on indefinite appointment, Theodore A. 
G tanas and Harry V. Truman. 

Interpretive Services 

The Interpretive Development Juiline for Yellowstone Park was carefully 
reviewed, edited, and retyped during the month. T is is the fifth time that 
procedure has been followed. 

The movie "Geyserland' 1 was projected in the Museum basement on March 22 
for a man from radio station KOOK, killings, Montane, who operates the Highway 
Courtesy Broadcast car. 

Park Naturalist Herkefiham presented a talk to the Gardiner P.T.A* on 
the National Parks Of California on the even-hv of March 21, and had an audience 
of Ul persons. He presented a talk on the morning of the 2uth to the grades 
5 - 8 at the Gardiner School. The 1 \ the talk was the National Parks 
of the Pacific States. There were 50 students in attendance. 

of Park Naturalist Condon presented a program bo the Livingston, 
Montana, Junior Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday evening, March 9, with 39 
members present. On the evening of March 1>, he presented a program to the 
Gardiner iiagles Dinner, with 156 people present. The movie •'GervTserland" was 
used to illustrate the talks at both of these programs. 

The Interpretive Servicers announcement bulletin ooards were refurbished 
and put in storage by Park Naturalist Seal pending their placement for the 
1955 season. 

Mus^ -. c"-lvities and '.xhibits 

M March 3 a collection of plants made by President Arthur on Ids 
Lour through Yellowstone was received from Idaho ';:tate College, where Dr. 
Ray Davis had mounted them for the Telle stone Park Ifoseura. These specimens 
were accessioned and placed in storage on March 28. 



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On March 1C Landscape Arc id tec t Sattson, Park Engineer tfohlbrandt, 
and Chief Park Naturalist Condon made a selection of tile to be used for floring 
in the West Yellowstone information Station. 

The Museum basement was given a thorough cleaning and reorganization 
by Park Naturalist Be&l during the month. In addition, he t ;ly cleaned 
and rearranged the Museum workshop. A great deal of accuisul. Isposed 

of and taken to the dump. 

2h 9 the Chief Park Naturalist conferred with Landscape 
Architect Matteon on the Uayside Exhibits which are to be installed along the 
road from Firehole Cascade to B MB t Basin. Five exhibits are suggested for 
this stretch of road: 

1. TGa iiez Perce 3toi*y - at Kit Perce Creek. 

2. The Geology of the Fountain Paint Pots Area * at Fountain Paint Pots. 
3* K&At To See in the Midway Geyser 3asin - at the Midway Geyser 

Basin parking area. 
U. The Geology and Geography of the Midway Geyser Basin - as seen 

from the Midway Geyser Basin* 
5. What To Sae in the Biscuit Gasin - the Phenomenon of the Eruption 

of Sapphire Pool. 

These proposed exhibits and parking areas along this stretch of road 
were discussed in the afternoon in conference in the Superintendent's office. 

Park Naturalist Berkenhais sent a set of representative Yellows tone rocks 
on indefinite loan to the Watonga City Schools, Watonga, Oklahoma. These were 
sent out on f'iarch 7. 

At the close of the month Park Natural al is in the process of 
refurbishing the Multiplex exhibit of Mode ', ineman pictures which are exhibited 
in the Mammoth Museum. 

Reeearch and Observations 

Park Naturalist Seal assembled considerable data on the grasses in 
the Yellowstone Park Herbarium for Dr. H. !•,, Bailey, and a detailed report 
prepared and sent to Br* Bailey. 



All three of the naturalists of the Divsion accompanied Ho 
Kittaas on March 11 for the purpose of assisting in the tagging of .id 
making photographs of this operation. 

The proof of the General Discussion and the Summary of Park 
Naturalist Robert Jonas 1 thesis on the beaver study, which, tie has been making 
the past two years, was reviewed, and comments on it were returned to Mr. J.nas, 
Re will receive his Masters Decree in Zoology fr a the University of Idaho in 
Moscow this spring. 

I March 31 the western blue birds had returned to the Mammoth area, 
and red-winged blackbirds had arrived. Robins were seen earlier in the month, 
but at the close of the month had apparently moved to a lower elevation. 



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Books received 12 

Hagasines received 1$ 

Pamphlets received 37 

Sooks in circulation IS 

Books on indefinite loan 91 

Natural tl:L,;'..^rj,'| .-it -so elation 

T Park Naturalist spent considerable time going over the 
publications sold and the procedure used Tor handling the public sale of books 
of the J ll'-y r«t Ml library and Museum Association with Park Naturalist Kerkenham, 
Mr. Herkenham will handle the sales activities of the Association with respect 
to public sales. 

The i i ation purchased a quantity of onltUitb. supplies, and new 
covers were placed on the multilith rollers on March 7, 

On March 9 large numbers of back issues of Yellowstone Mature Notes , 
along with some sales publications mere transmitted to :"ir. Ray .."ualloy of" 
killings, Montaiia, 

The Association is paying for the adaptation of two 7$im special 
lenses for use on the I6mt motion picture equipment, xm lens is being adapted 
for use with the Bill and Howell Model 7QDL, and the other lens is being adapted 
for use with the Cine-Special, 

)n March la the Association purchased a number af rubber stamps for 
the use of the Interpretive Division in stamping, addressing, and labeling 

tit u . 

The Association purchased &8 duplicate kodaslides from the Boeky 
.'ountain Nature Association, These were ordered on a sight-unseen basis and 
proved to be somewhat of a disappoint wnt* 

I manuscript of Fred Turner's I 'Reptiles and Amphibians is being pre- 
pared by Edwards Bros* Lithoprinters, T'-k-; proof of this pu'-.C 'cation was 
received on March 30, and is in the process of review at the month's close, 
RMF thousand of the pamphlet will be printed* dwards Bros,, Lithorrinters, 
is also printing 10,000 copies of "he Otory of 01c . qlthful -je ser by eorge 
Marler, 

During the month the Association purchased 50 reams of Treasure 
bond paper for use in publishing I ell ■_ .: _^ <£•« 

The January-February issue of Yellowstone Nature Notes was completed 
during the month, raultilithed, assembled, and hlb copies placed in the mail 
66 distributed locally. 

The Association purchased a nunber of books for the Research Ltbrar • 



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Mrs. Alice ^'st returned to active duty as clerk of the Association 
and has worked 10 hours in March. 

The Association^ printing press and type were used by the Fiscal 
Division for printing meal cards* Charlea Moon worked on the 23rd, 2Uth, and 
25th on this project. 

Park Naturalist Herkenhara and Association Clerk Alice Quist reviewed 
the pu ion needs for the Association's auamcr sales activities, and orders 

were r a) SUMM&? stock. At the sjonths close tr iente of these 

publics list's t.vre receive. 

e quipment v.--. -implies 

The suawser supply of light bulbs wras obtained from the Stora&ouaa 
toward the end of March. 

Orders were placed durin.-; the month t >r some equipjaent from the Bureau 
of Reclaimation. This equip rant consists of a Paco Print Lr^er, a Bell and 
Howell tripod, a Becordak inicrofilia enlarger, a Ilecorda ,; microfilm projector, 
and two pointer lights. A ."Loyal typewriter with a 20" carriage was also ordered 
from surplus list. This long-carria. s^Ti.ter La needed so that we can run 

multilith and mimeograph stencils through the long way. 

Photographic and Visual Aids 

Thirty 8 x 1C elossy prints of Indian materials were sent 1 
ieplogle on March 8, Several 8 x 10 ilossy prints were sent to the magaaine 

"Tie Instructor at the request of Mr. Herbert Evison. These prints will be. 
used ho illustrate a story in this periodical. A group of 8 x 10 enlargements 
were sent to iegion&l Chief of Interpretation Gtregg for use in illustrating an 
articl'- on bear feeding. 

Park Naturalist 3eal spent a goo4i deal of time working: over the collection 
of 35hbh black and white movie film w'-ach we have on hanu uc. ti ore 

Museum, fhil was inspected and repaired ay him, and ia now in condition for 
projection and review so that we ean select the taterial for duplication. 

Park Naturalist Herkenhara has been working over toe naster rile of 
kndaslides, and is weeding out inferior prints and those which have lost their 
color. 

Photographs were made of the elk tagging operations wrch 11. 

Thirty-two kodaslidaa were sent to Eastman Kodak Cor.jpany for the pre- 
paration of duplicates. These were received back on j^arch 31» The duplicates 
will be sent to the parks which requested copies, and the balance will be added 
to the Yellowstone Park kodaslide field s< ts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David de L. Condon 
;-- ' Chief Pari: Naturalist 

DCondon/ioa 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park 9, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly report for April, 1955 • 

Special Activities and Conferences 

Park Naturalist Jeal attended the Activities Committee meeting in 
the Acting Superintendent's office on April 6. 

Park Naturalist Herkenham attended a Staff Meeting in the Superin- 
tendent's office on April 6 to review the employment problems associated with 
hiring laborers. 

Park Naturalists Beal and Herkenham completed their Work Load Study 
reports and submitted them on April 9« Chief Park Naturalist Condon lias not 
yet completed his. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon left for Washington on April 2 to work 
at the Museum Laboratory on the exhibits for the /est Yellowstone Information 
station and the Old Faithful Museum. He then spent two weeks at the interior 
Building as a member of a committee which reviewed possible future public 
service facilities developments and operations in Yellowstone. Tl&s committee 
consisted of Superintendent .dmund 3. Rogers, Resident Landscape in itect 
Frank Hattson, Chief Ranger ?tto tf. Browi, Chief Pari: Naturalist David Condon, 
Principal Naturalist Bennett T. Gale, Business Analysis Section Chief Benjamin 
F. Dixon, Landscape Architect John A. Reshoft, and Assistant Chief of Conces- 
sions Management George 3. Hartzog. While on this assignment, several meetings 
of Mission 66 were attended. In addition it was possible to attend one meeting 
of the National Park Service Advisory Board as an observer. 

Condon attended the Staff Meeting In the Guperintendent's office on 
April 27, which was held to review pro res s on the West Yellowstone Information 
Station. 

Weligious Services and Chapel Use . 

The regular Sunday School services were held in the Yellowstone Park 
Chapel each Sunday at 10:00 a.m. except faster. The regular Church services 
were held each Sunday morning at 11:00 a.m. except faster. 

On Easter Sunday a special Sunrise Service was rid ' tc Ohapel 
at 6:00 a.m. Student Minister William Henning was in charge of all services. 
A capacity congregation attended the Easter service. The Chapel was especially 
decorated and there was special music. Following the service, there was an 
Easter breakfast in the Canteen with about 200 persons participating in 
activity. 

The rlev. I dward A. Syms of Livingston, Montana, held edal Com- 
munion service in the Chapel at 12:01 a. . ter Sunday, April 10. 



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In-Service Train -ng 

Park Natural late 3eal and Herkenhaia attended the Training Conference 
held in the Black Hills area. They left Yellowstone April 3 and returned on 
April 16. Park Naturalist Iteal led the discussion at the conference on Effective 
Use of Area Libraries and Furthering Conservation Objectives Thr i voning 
Campfire and Lecture Programs. Park Naturalist Herkenham led the discussion 
on Using Special Skills of Seasonal Employees. 

The regular Yellowstone Weekly Neve was mimeographed and distributed 
by the Division. 

Personnel 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month, but was on 
assignment in the Washington office from April 2 through April 2k* Park 
Naturalist 3eal was on duty all month and attended the Training Conference 
in the Black Hills area. Park Tfeturalist Herkenham acted as Chief of the 
Division from April 2 to 21, and was on duty to that date when be went on 
annual leave at IsOO p.m. on April 21. He expects to return early in *-tay. 
Clerk-Stenographer I»oore was on duty all month except one day's annual leave 
on April 15, and one day 1 -, sick leave on April 22. 

Acceptance of appointment by seasonal personnel has been received, 
and the seasonal naturalists not able to return are Willis &iigler, Ted A. Staraas, 
Kenneth Armitage, Frank Shaw, Harry ?# Truiaan, Robert K. Wolfer, and Hugh Klngery. 
It is not known as yet whether or no Joseph Murphy, ..obert Freer, William 
McGuinness, or Donald Larson will return. 

interpretive Services 

On April 2k, 50 members of the Montana Society of Natural and Earth 
Sciences visited the Yollovratone Park^luseura. ark Naturalist Seal gave them 
a epecial talk and ran off the movie " u eyser .Melodies" for them. 

On April h Park Naturalist Herkenham ran off the safe-driving movies 
for the Gardiner Hi .h Softool* Tbmm were U< hool students in attendance. 

)n April 19 Park Naturalist iierkenham presented a program to the 
Gardin r High School on the Geology of Yellowstone and Other Western Parks. 
Thirty-two students were present at this program. 

QH the evening of April 29 Chief Park Naturalist C-ndon presented 
a program to the Paradise Experimenters h-H Club and their friends at r , 
Montana. There were lii7 persons at this program, and the movie "Geyserland" 
shown. 



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Park Naturalist Beal rehabilitated the Mode Wineman Multiples exhibit 
of photographs and re-installed them in the museum foyer at Mamcoth. 



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'n April 22 all the cases in the Museum were uncovered and cleaned, 
the Museum made ready for public use. The lights were checked in the 
exhibit cases, and new light;, installed as needed. 

During the month 75 persons visited the Headquarters Museum. 

While in Washington , Chief Park Naturalist Condon assisted the Museum 
Laboratory in completing the exhibit lay-outs for Hi exhibits to be used in the 
Jest Yellowstone nformation Station. He also assisted the Museum Branch in 
preparing the lay-outs for 17 exhibits which are to go into the Old Faithful 
Museum, opecial pictures and specimens are to be obtained and shipped 
has 1 ington for use in the preparation of the exhibits. On April 28 a selection 
of negatives was made for use in sinking the photographic prints that will be 
part of the west Yellowstone Information Station exhibits. These were sent to 
the Museum Laboratory on April 29. 

Park Naturalist Beal did considerable work in the improvement of the 
Museum workshop. He changed the lighting units, f nished up a maple flooring 
top on the workbench, repainted parts of the workshop, and also repainted a 
large number of self -guiding nature trail signs. 

Research and Observations 

Park Naturalist Beal prepared two articles for use in Yellowstone 
•h^-Tc, »hes entitled "Ar: I ■ildlife Caravans HMftM ale" and "los^c- fcf Afld Ml 
Life Due to Gaseous Eroanations and Boiling Pools in Yellowstone National Park." 

On a trip through the Lamar Valley on April 2k Park Naturalist Beal 
counted 117 bison near the mouth of Crystal Creek. On that Basse day he saw 
three trumpeter swan on a small lake near Junctio , reports were received 
from local people that a brown-colored black bear with two black cubs were seen 
near the Insect Infestation area on April 2lu On April 12 several persons re- 
ported hav'.n^ sQen the osprey at ! a ;lc Hest ^ock in the Gardner Canyon. 
appears to be the earliest date the osprey was observed this year. 

Charles '.iebler, Park Ranger Naturalist, submitted nil thesis dm 
the month for review. It treats the subject of "Nature Trail Techniquea" 
This was reviewed and returned to hr. Iebler on April 26. 

hn the evening of April 19, In company with Mr. Edmund S. Rogers, 
Mr. John Doer, and Mr. Bennett T. Gale, Park Naturalist Condon attended a 
dinner with Mr. Horace ". Albright, and the group reviewed the research pos- 
sibilities for the thermal areas in Yellowstone which might be conducted by 
George D. Marler. 

Library 

3ooks received 11 
azines received 28 
Pamphlets received 3S> 
Books in circulation 1$ 
Books on Indefinite loan 91 






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Nat-ral History .Association 

The proof on Reptiles and Amphibians of Yellowstone ffasional Park 
by Frederick 3, Turner was checked and returned tc Edwards Brothers, Litho- 
pr inters, on April 8. It is anticipated that this publication will be available 
for sale on or before June 1. 

Books were delivered by the Association to Haynes, Inc., on April 29. 

A book stock of 10,120 copies of The " tor y of )ld Faithful Geyser was 
received during the month from Edwards Bro s . , Li tho printers • "" 

W. Verde Watson* s manuscript on the Norris Geyser Basin was tyiped in 

final form b the clerk of the Association, and this copy has been reviewed by 
Park Naturalist Beal. 

The Protection Division used the Associations multilith for the 
preparation of Motor Vehicle Permits for Seasonal Employees, and on April 21 
they completed the stapling, cutting, and perforating ©f these in the Museum 
basement* 

The 1600-foot copy of the "Geyserland" movie which has developed a 
peculiar c*ac*dLnf> was sent to Sastman Kodak Company for examination. 

The Association S -sipped out duplicate kodaslides which were ordered 
by Glacier National Park, nocky Moimtain National Park, and Effigy Mounds 
National Monument. 

The book stock for the 1955 season has been reeeivwl and stored. 
The Association^ bills which were outstanding were paid at the close of the 
month. The Association paid for the adaptation of two 75ihbi special F-k tele- 
scopic lenses for use on the I6ima raotlor? picture equipment. 

Equipment and Supplies 

The top of the typewriting table which was badly damaged was ref inished 
in the Workshop by Park Naturalist Beal. The Cutawl, which was on loan to Frank 
Mattson for the past year, was returned during the month. 

Park Naturalists Beal and Rerkenham took the following equipment to the 
Training Conference in the Black Hills areas Portapage Public Address Unit, 
Megaphone ?3.ectro-Volce Speaker, Electro-Voice Lava: icrophone, Astatic 

-n : icro hont . 

The janitorial supplies for use in the Museums were purchased during 
the month. Purchase orders wore sent out for batteries, radio tubes, projector 
lamps, condenser lenses, and other supplies needed to keep the audio-visual 
aids equipment in good order during the 1955 season. 

Fr ni surplus property lists, the Division obtained 10 pair of 6 x 30 
binoculars on April 25, and on April 27 a 20 H carriage Royal typewriter. 



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Photographic and Visual Aids 

A number of 1; x 5 and 5x7 prints of Protection Division activities 
were made for use at the Training Conference in the Black Hills « 

A set of photographs was sent to Howard Stegner for use in illustrat 
an. article on vandalism in c ports ■ilus tra tec . * -"dly .ife Magazine was sent 
a number of 3 x 1C enlargements cf fishing ai Fishing Bridge and campin - in 
this area. 

Forty-eight kodasltdes which have been on loan to treat Smoky -fountains 
Natio al Park were returned near mid-month. During the a:; nth 66 kodaslides were 
sent out on loan to Mr, Harvey Reynolds, Superintendent of Pipestone National 
Monument, 

The lfcsam motion picture on loan to Wallace Hennessy was returned. 

Respectfully Butauittod, 



David de L, Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



cc 

Condon 

Museum' 

3X>andon/W 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park June 6, 1955 
Chief Park Naturalist 
Monthly Report, lay 1955 

special Activities and Conferences 

The Chief Park Naturalist attended special conferences in Superinten- 
dent Roger's office on May 4- and 11 concerning the planned spruce budworra 
spraying which will be done in July by the U. S. Forest Service. On May U 
Mr. William Ibenthal and Mr. C. B. Sutliff of the U. S. Forest Service were 
at the conference, as well as Messrs. Rogers, Hamilton, Brown, Chapman, Edwards, 
and Kittams. It was proposed that an intensive study be made of the ecological 
effects of this spraying, and inquiries were placed with Utah State Agricultural 
College and Mon ana : tate College to see if biologists might be available from 

either institution to conduct such a study. At the month's close it had been 
determined that the entire proposed research project was not feasible and could 
not be conducted in conjunction with the spraying operation. 

On May A a lengthy memorandum was prepared, together with rough sketch 
maps showing the locations where it is most desirable to install wooden walks 
in thermal areas. 

On May 5 a conference was held wit' evident Landscape Architect lattson 
concerning the signs which it was thought desirable to install at the lest 
Yellowstone Information Station. 

Mr. Phil Vohlbrandt, Park Engineer, was called to the Museum on May 10 
for the purpose of examining the badly deteriorated condition of the front steps 
to the Museum building. It is considered that the physical condition of these 
steps constitutes a hazard. 

The Chief Park Naturalist attended the regular Staff Meeting of the 
Superintendent, which was held in the Conference Room on May 13. 

On May 13 Messrs. Hamilton, Brown, hohlbrandt, Mattson, Armstrong, and 
Condon went over the Mammoth lot Spring Terraces to review the location of the 
new wooden walk which is to be installed. 

On May 1U considerable time was spent with Mr. Jack E. Haynes in con- 
ference about changes and alterations which should be made in the Haynes Guidebooh 
1955 edition. 

On J4ay 20 the Chief Park Naturalist attended a conference in the Super- 
intendent's office on the northern elk problem. Mr. Brandborg of the American 
Wildlife Institute also attended for the purpose of gathering information on 
this problem. Others at the conference were Messrs. Kittams, Joffe, Drown, and 
Hamilton. 









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Most of the day on May 10 was devoted to a review of the proposed 
Interpretive program for the summer with Bark Naturalists Herkenham ant! Beal. 

Religious Services and Chanel Use , 

The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used by #e community for 
religious services during May. The regr-lar Sunday School service was held 
each Sunday at 10*00 a.m. through May 22, On this date a special Sunday fchool 
eervice was held and awards r:iven Sunday School members who had earned them. 

The regular Protestant services of the Winter Ministry were held each 
Sunday in the Yellowstone Park Clap 1 at 11:00 a.m. Student Minister 'illiam 
'leaning conducted the services. Following the regular church service on May 2? 
a special congregational meeting was held to hear the report of the activities 
of the 195^-55 Winter Ministry program. The last service to be conducted b 
the Winter Ministry was held on Why 89. 

In-Service Training 

Plans for the training offered at the annual Rangers Conferenc « 
May 16 m 20, were reviewed with Chief Park Ranger Otto Brown on May 2. 
that time agreement was reached as to the part members of the naturalist Divi- 
sion will play in this program. 

On May 9 Park Naturalir enham WftG taken on a "Show Me" training 
trip to Old Faithful and return. Considerable time was spent on the "Jaramoth 
Spring Terraces, Harris Geyser Basin, Madison Junction area, and in each 
of the Geyser Basins along the Firehole River. 

On May 19 the Chief Bark Naturalist took Park Naturalist Herkenham 
on a "Show Me" training trip to the Grand Canyon, Mud Volcano area, rest Entrance , 
and Weat Thumb, On this trip a great deal of Ifif ormation was given hira about 
the phenomena which he was seeing, and about the Interpretive facilities and 
program which are conducted in association wit them. 

Park Naturalists Seal and Herkenham attended the Ranger Conference 
training sessions on May 16, 17, and 18. They participated actively in the 
entire program, especially in the rock climbing, at which tine they made movies 
and stills of the activities. Chief Park Naturalist Condcn participated in the 
program on May 16 and presented ■ discussion for the gr<^P on Mission £6. 

A new movie has been edited from 1 rsonal film library of Chief 
Park Naturalist Condon, and was presented to the members of the Mammoth com- 
■unity and the trainees of the conference on the evening of May 18. The l(xm 
motion picture is entitled "Your Yellowstone" an treatment of the natural 
resources of Yellcstone National Park. 

Park Naturalist Beal participated in a training session for 1 Kangera 
tad ? accountants on May 23. Mr. Beal served as instructor concerning operation 
of the cash regirters used for dispensing entrance per 

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The fiscal office personnel held training sessions on accounting 
and storehouse procedures on the evenings of the 16th and 23rd c\ from 
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. with Mr. Ellis Gabbert leading the discussion. 

The re;palar Y ellowstone keekly Keys Letter was mimeographed and 
distributed by the Naturalist Division. 

Personnel 

Clerk-Steno>?rapher Winona Moore was on duty all month except one 
day of annual leave taken on Hay 3. Park Naturalist Herkenham was on duty 
except for forty hours of annual leave t uring the first ww . r. 
Herkenham entered on duty from leave May 9. Park Naturalist 3eal war on duty 
all month, except one day of annual leave taken on May 13. Chief Park Naturalist 
Condon was on duty all month. 

The tours of duty for Park Naturalist Herkenham and Seal were changed 
beginning May 22 wit? . erkenhaa having Sundays and Mondays off and Mr. Seal 
having Fridays and Saturdays off. 

Dur ng the vionth a large number of letters were sent out to seasonals 
and candidates for seasonal jobs. At the month's close there were 1] four 
vacancies to be filled. 

: . Clyde Lussier was in the Chief Park naturalist's office on May I 
for a conference with respect to 1 is employment as a seasonal naturalist. 

Park Naturalists Ted Parkinson and George Hurler entered on duty as 
seasonals on May 23 and have been assigned to duty at Old Faithful. 

Inte rpretive Services 

The 16 mm. motion picture "kild Animal Heaven-' was loaned to the 
district ranker at Vest Yellowstone and was used for four public *! swings with 
a total attendance of 267 persons. The movie was returned to park headquarters 
on May 13. 

The movie "Your Yellowstone" was shown in the canteen on May IS to an 
audience of 14.0 people by Chief Park Naturalist Condon. 

The public contacts at the Upper Geyser Basin for park ranger natur- 
alists on basin Datrol were 300 persons and for the cone talks given at Old 
Faithful Geyser Cone 2400 people. The Old Fait' ..-ogram was started May 23 
and consisted of museum information service, cone talks and seme field ob e,r 
tions on geyser 8. 

On May 6 a set of negatives showing snow removal were fur; the 
rk County News and were used by that paper to illustrate stories of the r* 
opening in Yellowstone. 

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On May 17 Park Naturalist Biddulph, who is a professoi lcka 
College in Rexburg, Idaho, brought into the park a geology class of 11 
students. These students were given a one and one-half hour talk on the 
geology of Yellowstone and the significance of its other natural resources 
by Chief Park Naturalist Condon. The relief map and geology exhibits in the 
Mammoth Museum were used to good advantage in giving information to this group. 

On >fay 12 Chief Park Naturalist took the General Science class of 

the Gardiner High School consisting of 18 pupils and their teacher on a field 

trio to the geyser basins along the Firehole River. This group of pupils ere 

very attentive and it was thought that they were able to gain some interesting 
information on Yellowstone on this venture. 

eum Activities and Exhibits 

On May 2 the damaged tile was he floor at the Mammoth 

Museum and replaced by a new tile and this floor is again intact. 

The Mammoth Museur. open all month except on Ma-. !L4, 15 and 21. 
A total of 823 people used the museum and exhibits during May. 

Shipments of negatives and photographic prints for use in the prep- 
aration of exhibits for the Old Faithful Museum were shipped to the Museum 
Laboratory in Washington, D, C. on May 18 and 31. Rock specimens for use in 
the preparation of the exhibits at Old Faithful were collected on field trips 
on the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 27th of the month. A great deal of time was iven 
over to the selection of materials for use in the preparation of these ex- 
hibits. 

The museum workshop walls were painted and also tool rachs were riade 
for tool storage in this workshop by ?ark Naturalist Seal. 

The armounceraent board for the time of eruption of the Daisy Geyser 
was repainted ?.ot us by Bill Olson at the Paint Shop and was reinstalled at 
Daisy Geyser. 

The Wayside Exhibit shuttars were removed ttaa the Moose Exhibit, the 
Obsidian Cliff Exhibit, the Harris luseum Foyer Exhibits Si ' I .e Can- 
yon Exhibits on May 19 by Park Naturalist Beal. On f is same day Chief Park 
Naturalist Condon removed the shutters from the Artist Point anyon. 

These inhibit* were in use the balance of the month and served 39,600 people. 

Old Faithful . ;u eun wai opened for public use on May 23 and since 
date 2,200 people have been counted using the exhibits. 

The shutters -ere removed from Fishing r useum on May 31 by 
Parh Naturalist lierkenham and Biddulph. The museum 3 open on June 1. 

Cn May 11 Park Naturalist Herkenham made an excliange of cartridges 

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On May 17 Park Naturalist Biddulp , o is a professor at Rlcka 
Colle ce in Rexburg, Idaho, brought into the park a geology class of 11 
students. These students were given a one and one-half hour talk on the 
geology of Yellowstone and the significance of its other natural resources 
by Chief Park Naturalist Condon. The relief map and geology exhibits in the 
Mammoth Museum were used to good advantage in giving information to this group. 

On May 12 Chief Park Naturalist took the General Science class of 
the Gardiner High School consisting of 18 pupils and their teacher on a field 
trio to the geyser basins along the Firehole River. This group of pupils were 
very attentive' and it was thought that they were able to gain some interesting 
information on Yellowstone on this venture. 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 

On May 2 the damaged tile wis - e floor at the Ifemmoth 

Museum and replaced by a new tile and thia floor is again intact. 

The Mammoth Museum was open all month except on Ma- 1£, 15 and 21. 
A total of 823 people used the museum and exhibits during May. 

Shipments of negatives i otographio prints for use in the prep- 
aration of exhibits for the Old Faithful Museum were shipped to the Museum 
Laboratory in Washington, D, C, on May 18 and 31. Rock specimens for use in 
the preparation of the exhibits at Old Faithful were collected on field trips 
on the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 27th of the month. A great deal of time was given 
over to the sanction of materials for use in the preparation of these ex- 
hibits. 

The museum workshop walls were painted and also tool racks were m 
for tool storage in thia workshop by Park Naturalist Baal. 

The announcement board for the time of eruption of the Daisy Geyser 
was repainted for us by Bill Olson at the Paint Shop and was reinstalled at 
Daisy Geyser. 

The Wayside Exhibit shutters were removed from the lioose Exhibit, the 
Obsidian Cliff Exhibit, the Karris luseum Foyer Exhibits i ole Can- 

yen Exhibits on May 19 by Park Naturalist Baal. On this same da; Laf Park 
Naturalist Condon removed the shutters from the Artist Point Canyon. 

These exhibits were in use the balance of the month and served 39,600 people. 

Old Faithful Museum wns opened for public use on May 23 and since 
date 2,200 people have been counted using the exhibits. 

The shutters -ere removed from Fishing r useum on :!ay 31 by 
Park Naturalist Ilerkenhara and Biddulph. The museum will open on June 1. 

Cn May 11 Park Naturalist Herkenham made an exchange of c :• ridges 



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In one of the island exhibit cases in the Headquarters Museum historical room. 
The cartridges which were priced in the exhibit case were obtained from District 
?-»-" v Ranger "Lee Coleman, They were more in keeping with the v ire- 

;nos on display than those which were in the case. The ones removed were given 
r. Coleman* in exchange for the cartridges of older vintage. 

Research and Observations 

On May 3 Park Naturalists Condon and. Beal made a trip to Old Faithful 
and to the Black Dragon 1 s Caldron in Hayden Valley. Enroute- t: ent con- 
siderable time or: the hot Terrace; .^yoer , The 
:aftin purpose of the trip was to determine the location for the wooden walks in 
the thersjal areas. It was determined that 1&50 feet of walh should be installed 
on the Ifemmoth Terraces* about 1000 feet in the Upper Geyser Basin; about 300 
feet in the Paint "ots area; 360 feet in biscuit Basin and about 240 feet in 
the Black Dragon's Caldron area. This season the Bla< ■agon's Caldron is 
active along the entire 104-foot fissure with the most activity bei the 
itbem end of the fissure, From all appearances the mud in the caldron is 
becoming less fluid than in the fast and if it is not replenished with ■•alter 
from some source it is conceivable that the caldron *7 up in some sections. 

In the Harris Geyser Basin the Black #owl«* d tenia Vent is esceeedingly 
hot with a record tempera ture of 224° F. being ta are on Iky 7, On Sfay 12 
another temperature reading made at this site recorded only a temperature of 212° 
F. The steam vent is creating a neater roar than for the pa . ral 
years. In the Norris Goyser Basin there have been a number of pronounced t 
occur and accompanying these is the development of two large mud caldrons on the 
southwest side of the main trail in the Bas5x, the change in character of t 
Coloidal hools from a boilinr:, turbid pool to an eruptive geyser and the greatly 
lMrer ed activity in the Fireball Geyser with e: ehiag an estimated 
height of 30 to 4C feet. 

On 14ay 3 in the Biscuit Basin a very unique and interesting phenomena 
was observed in the Sep hire ool Just -irior to its eruption. On this day t 
were Innumerable snow squalls wit • of the snow being of the pellet type. 

M the Sapphire ool would reach a superheated state prior to eruption and a 
snow squall would come u pellets striking in the pool caused intense boil- 
ing at the site where each pellet struck and with, the hundreds of bum pellets 
•euslBg this Intense boiling it created a pattern of unusual beauty as well as 
being unique in character. 

On May 6 specimens of rocks for use in the Old Faithful Museum exhib- 
its were obtained — travert dammoth Hot Springs Terraces, travertins 
the ' oodooe, rhyolite from Golden Gate, altered rhyolite from near '"orris Geyser 
Basin, welded tuff from the Gibbon bridge above Gib: Is, volcanic tuff from 
Tuff Cliff, welded tuff from the Firehole Canyon, cemented glacial gravel from 

orcupine Hills, geyserite from near Great Fountain Geyser and geyserite from 
near Giant Geyser. On this trip sandhill cranes were observed at the Lower 

yser Basin and at a swamp near hymph Lake. A und 

near hbmph Lake and has been observed for the balance of the month. 
month's close incubation had not been completed. 



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Several bison calves have been observed in the Lover Geys< in. 
Moose have been observed in the Swan Lake-Willow Park area on all field trips. 
r- tl g evening of May 7 a female grizzly bear with her 2->year old offspring 
was observed grazing on the green grars near Clearwater Springs. These bears 
were unafraid and proceeded about their normal business, < wo- 

strating some amusing antics and on two occasions they reared up to trees and 
oroceeded to scratch their st< oache and chins and then turned around and 
scratched their bachs by rubbing up and down. These same bears remined in 
this area about ten days and or: May 9 about 120 feet of 16 mm. motion picture 
film was exposed of them under good light conditions. 

Trumpeter rwan have been observed on Swan Lake, at the Blacktail 
Lakes and at Trumpeter Lake in the Lamar Valley, A pair have also been ob- 
served nesting on Beach Spring Lagoon at Mary Bay. The pair on Swai • are 
also nesting. Other birds observed seem to be transient. 

The ffwimifli Hot Spring Terraces were thoroughly explored on several 
occasions during the month and there have been a number of interesting shifts 
Is the activity there during the winter. At t! e close of May v,here is intense 
activity at Opal Spring at the base of Capitol Kill, a good flow of water from 
Cavern • spring, a decrease of water from the old Swim ocl Spring, an in- 
crease in Palette Extension Spring with a decline in Palette SpH . 'he 
Minerva Spring and T errace continues to be one of the most beautiful on 
terraces and there has been a pronounced increase in the flow of water at 
Cleopatra Spring and Terrace. A sizeable area consisting of many acres is 
flooded by Naiad Spring and Jupiter Spring. On the u per terraces Canary 
Spring has shifted its activity over to the base of the glacial moraine on 

southern end of Main Terrace and a sufficiently large volume of water 
flows from it and Blue Spring on Main Terrace to flood some of the Upper Ter: 
on down to the Old Reservoir site below Jupiter Terrace. The large cpring on 
Main Terrace at the site of the old Periodical Lake is currently very active 
and floods a large portion of the Main Terrace, Cupid Spring is active from 
I vents and is very colorful. There is no activity at Narrow Gauge Terrace. 
Two small spring vents are active at the Prospect Springs. Probably the most 
unusual and Interesting activity on the terraces t present tiae is the 
shift in activity which has taken place on Highland errace where the spring 
which was very active last year and the year before in an area where there has 
been no activity for probably .'.iore than 150 years has moved on west along the 
big crack or fissure at the edge of Highland Terrace. The new zone of activity 
has a very heavy flow of water out of the fissure which has formed a pool with 
a diameter of about 30 feet and out of one edge of the pool the water is flow- 
ing into a huge crack and flows for some distance along this crac tc tumble 

WB through the big fissure on the very steep slope, disappearing with a roar 
into nowhere. 

Osprey were observed nesting during the month on pinnacle s in the 
Grand Canyon, on Eagle Nest Reek ir. the Gardiner River Canyon and at the nest 
on the pinnacle above the drinking fountain at the beginning of Fire'ole Canyon. 



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One of the birds from this nest site was observed diving for fish in the Fire- 
hole River on May r ). 

The sandhill crane nest which is located ver the road in the 
swamp next to the sharp curve south of hijah Spring below south Twin Lake is 
a classic examole of the protective coloration of birds. On May 12 this bird 
was shown to the High School science class and although it was relatively 
close at hand they were unable to distinguish the bird on the nest until they 
were able to study it with binoculars. 

On I'ny 13 Plologiet Kittaae, : orecter 'Barrows and Parh Naturalist 
Condon prepared a proposed research project study to be associated with the 
spruce budworm spraying project. This proposed study is not going to mater- 
ialize. 

There have been sonie very interesting changes in the dumb 
Geyser Basin during the winter months and of most pronounced importance is 
the change in the volume of water in the large pools adjacent tc the road in 
front of the Hamilton Store and the drop in the water level at Fishing Cone. 
This is the first time that aturalist Condon remembers having seen the 
water level down as low in Fishing Cone. 

Mr. F. B. Turner arrived in the park on May 23 to continue his de- 
tailed study of the western spotted frog and as part of hie study he has been 
naking tape recordings of the sounds made by these animals. 

On May 24, Chief Par!: Naturalist Condon accompanied 'ark Engineer 
ohlbrandt, Regional Landscape Architect Mattson, Geologist W, M. Hansen, Park 
Ranger Contor, District Park Ranger Coleman and Construction Foreman Armstrong 
t r the Inspiration Point at Grand Canyon for the purpose of observirg the rock 
structure of that prominance. After spending considerable time there no new 
discoveries were made which altered previous observations and comments with 
respect to the safety of this point and the installation of observe: tion facili- 
ties there. 



Several books and pamphlets pertaining to John Colter were sent on 
a loan basis to the '.'alt Disney Studios at Burbanh, California. In addition 
to this loan the following listing shows publications receive-;: and the use of 
the library during the month: 

Books received 9 

;izines received 20 

Pamphlets received 29 

Books in circulation 25 
Books on indefinite 

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Natural History Associatio n 

The Association's printing press was used luring the month for the 
printing of tickets and other items by the Gardiner High School. 

During the month a stock of books entitled The Field G uide to Rocks 
and Minerals which will be sold by the Association was received from the 
Houghton Mifflin Company. The copy for the March-April Issue of re Kotes 
was completed and is read; for final stenciling and distribution. A total of 
eleven kodaslides were shipoed to Meston*s for duplication and inclusion in 
the summer files. 

Park Naturalist Beal multilithed the book s&lftfl forms for the Assoc- 
iation and also ran off the auto permit forms for the Protection Division. 

Four thousand copies of a new booh, Reptiles and Amphibians cf iel- 
lowsione national Fork by Frederick B, Turner arrived on May 31. n this same 
date we also received a shipment of Alon - Yellowstone and Grand Teton Trails , 
from Hastings House and this completes the acquisition of the summer gales 
■vtock for the Association. 

Park Naturalist Tlerkenham, Parkinson and Marler all took piclcup loads 
of Association publications to Old Faithful on May 23 and their book stock is 
now on sale. Park Naturalist ; erkenhara attl Biddulph each hauled a load of 
books to Fishing Bridge on May 31 and Park Ranger Naturalist Rancher picked up 
the book stock for sale at Madison Museum on May 31. 

Equipment and Supplies 

During the month a Recordak Microfilm Enlarger w r \s obtained from the 
surplus list of the Bur au of Reclamation. It arrived on May 5 and r at* 
uralists Beal, Herkenham and Gordon spent so:.-io time learning the details of 
its operation. 

On May 4- Park Na turn list Beal serviced the Yellowstone Rational Park 
School' 3 Bell and Howell, model 1£5C, 16 mm. motion picture projector. During 
t e month a sup-ly of batteries for use in the public address system and a 
supply of radio tubes for use in this equipment was received. 

Pholor-raohie and Visual Aids 

On a trip to Old Faithful there were US black and white 4x5 pictures 
made of the pools, geysers, springs and other thermal features for use in the 
•reparation of the exhibits for the Old Faithful Museum. 150 4x5 prints were 
made from these negatives on May 22. 38 Ax5 negat:' v re made of the rock 
climbing rvrl ranger training pro-ran on May 17 and. 13 and prints were made 
the albums. 120 feet of 16 mm. motion picture were ex of a grizzly bear 
and 120 feet of the rock climbing at the Grand Canyon. On May 25 Pari: Natural! st 
7T erkenham took pictures of the two groups of the Mammoth grade school. 

° c Respect:. 1] .submitted, 

,/Condon 

^ se ™ , , David de L. Condon 

DCondon/wm/ahq Chief Park ifeturalist 



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Superintendent, Yellowsto:ie rational Rfcjrk July 7, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist 
Monthly Report, June 1955 

Special Activities and Conferences 

On June 1 Mr. Marvin E # Richey of the U. S, Geological Purvey was in 
the Chief Park Naturalist's office to obtain information on place names and to 
run down the report of the Northern Boundary survey made by ". A. Bandy. 

On June 2 Hr, Murk J. Boesch was in the Chief Park Naturalist's office 
to t -rat' er inforsiation about Yellowstone Park for use in a bosk uliicii he is writing 
for juveniles. Mr. Boesch is a -writer from Hamilton, Montana, and his book will 
be published by the Alfred PncnxB^ublishlng Company, 

On June 8 C ief Park Naturalist Condon tallied to H. W. Sttgner of the 
Mission 66 staff of Washington, D« C., and at that time was requested to supply 
the Direc.or's office wit- kodaslides and 6 x 1C enlargements on such subjects 
as vandalism, concession installations, intrusions into and development of sacred 
areas, motel units outside the park, and similar subjects. 

Two former pari ranger naturalists visited in the park during the month 
and they were Dwight Smiley on June 8 and Mildred rickson on June 1A. 

On June 9 the Chief Bark Naturalist visited 'est Yellowstone. At that 
time he tallied with Ht. Kewaf-d Young and borrowed pictures of the snowmobiles 
frco him. These were sent to the Director's office. 

On June 21 "x. B, T. Bartlett, representative of the Eastman odak 
C mpany, was in the CT ief Park Naturalist's office zsaking inquiry concerning 
photographic problems. At that time he left souse boo! lets on film and film 
processing for use in the headquarter,' darkroom 

Mr. Hamilton Pissell, Pirector of Scholarship Boys at Philips Exeter 
Academy, arrived in the park on June 20 and left on June 23. Mr. BisseH was 
taken around tie lower loop of the park by C v ief Park Naturalist Condon and it 
was possible to show him most of the outstanding things which Yellowstne has to 
offer. 

The wooden walks and other constructed walks on the Pot Spring Terraces 
were completed during the month by istrong and his crew. These walks are 

a pronounced addition to the Terraces and are receiving heavy use by the pa. 
visitors. Their locations have ijreatly facilitated the enjoyment of the spr 
by the people and have made it possible for the seasonal naturalists to conduct 
sir trips more easily and efficiently. 






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tafk Nature 1st Beal devoted considerable time during the month to the 
preparation of quarters for seasonal personnel / etting these people st 
in their quarters for the 1955 season. 

On June 24. a chain eav uae taken t '.son Junction, Jay Rencher and 
otlter naturalists at >fedison out up the logs,w ! ich had been hauled in by the road 
crews, and used them in building a fine little campfire circle, T is is a pro- 
nounced addition to the Interpretive facilities at ;4idison. The saw was borrowed 
from Stan MeConas. 

uellgious 'i'erviees and Chapel Uss 

On Jim© 10 Mr, Joe Bill, printer for the Yellowstone Park Company, 
printed the Yellowstone Park Church Servioei SSJ edule ; These were distributed 
to the field for inclusion on all bulletin boards. 

On June 16 r. Trad hurke was given a key to the Chapel for he use of 
the Roman Catholic priest who will conduct mt,; am eaeh S nday. 

The Rev. harren H, Ost, hv.roctor of the htudent Hlrdstry in the JJational 
Parks, arrived in Yellowstone on June 12 and spent a little over a week here before 
leaving on J ne 21. On the <'-0th he discussed the ministry program with the Grief 
Park Ectur&list. During his stay here he liad conferences with the I Superintendent 
and other persons interested in the religious services program. 

On June 2£ the Church Services Bulletin Board was installed at the 
Chapel. This wag erected in memory of Margaret mold and } verett L. Arnold. 

On June 3 Mr. Huntley Child signed c • .■?. ich 'ere sent to the fh man 
Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, and Latter Bay Saints missionaries for 
their use in obtaining free lodging at the lodges when they conduct services here. 

Correspondence was carried on during the month with the Roman Catholics, 
'rotestants, and Latter Day Saints in arranging for Church services, 

A circular was prepared listing the religious services program in detail. 
This circular was distributed to all rangers, ranger natura3i.sts, information 
desks, and all centers where people congregate or seek information Copies of 
thie were also sent to all of the Church grevpi involved in the religious services 
urogram. A copy of this circular is attached. 

Church services ;ere initiated for the 1955 season by the student minis- 
ters On June 5. Services were held by the student ministers at Old Faithful and 
Manrioth on June 12, and at all stations as scheduled beginning June 19. Roman 
Catholic services started oune 19 throughout the pork, Latter Day Saints services 
at all stations on June 19, Park County 2-linieterlal Association at Old Faithful 
on June 19, and Cody Ministerial Association at Lake on June 19. 






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In-Ser vice Training 

On June 6 Chief Park Naturalist Condon and Chief Ranger Brown worked up 
a joint in- service training program for seasonal personnel. 

On June 8 Chief Park Naturalist Condon presented an in-service training 
talk to the bus drivers of the Yellowst ne Park Company, also shoved the movie 

"Geyscrland . " There were 34 persons at this meeting. 

On June 14, 15, 16, and 17 am intensive in-service training program was 
provided for the seasonal park rangers and seasonal park ranger naturalists. The 
Interpretive Division personnel did not participate on the 14th, but did take 
an active part on the three succeeding days. A copy of the training program 
is attached to this report. 

The Chief Park Naturalist took the seasonal rangers and seasonal natur .— 
lists on a guided trip of the lower r ot Spring Terraces on the evening of June 15. 

In-service training was given to the Yellowstone National Park concession 
employees as follows t 

Jfemmoth Recreation 'fell, June 20, by Chief Park naturalist Condon 
and District Ranger Grimm, 182 persons present. 

Old Faithful Lodge ~ Recreation Sail, June 24, Chief P rk naturalist 
Condon and District Ranger Ela f 280 persons present. 

Canyon Lodge recreation fell, ItaSM) 30, Park Naturalist Replegl* 
and District Ranger Coleman, 565 persons present ineludi> g tourists. 

Lake Lodge Recreation Hf.11, Fishing Bridge Cafateria, and .est 
Thumb Cafeteria - in-service training program presented by Park 
Naturalist Biddulph aofl District hanger Stevens. 

yfr, George Tfehn, seasonal hark Ranger Faturalist, was taken on an in- 
rervice trait ing trip around the loop on June 23. 

All seasonal park ranger naturalists \mr® issued training publications 
by number, a?id these will be returned to the Chief hark Naturalist's office at the 
termination of their tour of duty. The publications issued, ares Saployscs hrich 
Infornstlon Please . Qaypfire I-iro^roas. Conducted Trips . In addition to these, each 
man was issued a field notebook for use in assembling pertinent notes on the Inter- 
pretive prorram and natural history. 

^ergonnel 

Park ?iaturalist Beal was on duty all month. Park ikturalist Herkenham 
was on duty all month. Chief Park l&turalist C ndon was on duty all month. Clerk- 
stenographer Moore was on duly through June 6 and was on sick and annual leave the 
balance of the month. l*rs. Alice Quist substituted for hire, loore from June 7 to 
the end of the month and should be credited with contributing a great deal to the 
effort of getting the 1955 program underway. 

Seme declinations were received from personnel originally expected to 
report for duty for the 1955 season and it was necessary to fill those vacant posi- 
tions with nei; applicants. By the months close all positions were filled with the 






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exception of one. It Is anticipated that an additional man will bo delected for 
Old Faithful rhortly after July 1. The entry dates for seasonal personnel are 
as follows: 



fork ifaturaligts 
George D. Jferlor 
Lowell G, Biddulph 
Herbert T. Lystrup 
■Wayne 7, RaplQgle 
Clarence C. Alleman 

Park Ranker i&tural:^ 
Ted J. Parkineen 
B. Jay Rencher 
Samuel li. 5eal 
Joseph F, Cataaull 
William A. Fischer 
Alraa B« Teuscher 
Viall&ee M. Good 
Joseph r, Mnryftf 
Arthur y&eh 
Frederick B. Turner 
Robert J. Jonas 
"Jilliara T. Driscoll 
Charles J, Gebler 
Walter ?» Rerriman 
Clyde J, Lnssier 
h'illiam L. Baker 
George A. Gardner 
Raymond T. Heckaman 
I'erbert H. Moline 
Donald C, Stewart 
Ilerrold A saws sen 
Frank D, Rentchl^r 
Wallace J. Hennessy 
Thad V, Stevens 
Donald W. ^raon 
George w. l-fehn 
Otis Rcbbina, Jr. 
Simon Siaonian 
George K, Sverdrup 

Laborer (Janitor) 
Howard L. Biddulph 
Ted C. Davis 
burton E. Anderson 



K. 0. D. 

l/:\3/55 

6/1/55 

6/6/55 

6/13/55 

6/20/55 

M^ 

6/2/55 

V3/55 

6/6/55 

6/6/55 

6/7/55 

6AO/55 

6/10/55 

6AO/55 

6A1/55 

6/12/55 

6/13/55 

6/14/55 

6/L4/55 

6/14/55 

6A5A5 

cA5/55 
6/L5/55 
6/15/55 
6/17/55 
6/20/55 
6/20/55 
6/21/55 
6/25/55 
6/27/55 
6/27/55 
6/28/55 
6/30/55 

a. 0. D. 
#l75T 
6/6/55 
6A/55 



On June 30 vouchers were submitted for all seasonal and permanent uniform 
personnel for the uniform allowance. 


















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Work Load A»2ysee f or the period June 5 through June 18 were suhoitted 
by Bark ^Naturalists Berkenham, Beal, and Condon on June 2l f 

Park Naturalists ^3eal and Herkenhaa laa&e up the time slips for all seasonal 
personnel and the tours of duty. 

Interpretive jervices 

The following special Interpretive services were provided by the members 
of the Interpretive Division: 

Program to Farm Bureau group, June 3» by Condon, 63 persons present. 
Railroad Ticket Agents, Old Faithful Inn, June 22, Herkenham, 

71 ticket agents and 230 guests present. 
Railroad Ticket agents, Old Faithful Inn, June 23, Beal, 

35 ticket agents &nd 360 uests present. 
Concession employees training talk - Interpretation of Yellowstone, 

Canyon, June 30, Replogle, 565 so* present* 

Gearjamraers - Interpretation of Yellowstone, Mi :.imoth, June 8, Condon, 

8£ persons present. 
Concession employees trainirg talk - Interpretation of Yellowstone, 

Maimsoth, June 2C, Condon, 182 persons present. 
Concession employees training talk - Interpretation of Yellowstone, 

Old Faithful, June 24., Condon, 280 persons present. 

All day service was given to a Boy Gc ut group on June 27 by Dhiaf Baffc 
ifeturalist Condon with about 22 people contacted. The same group was conducted 
by Park Naturalist Beal on June 23. 

On Jrone 28 Chief Park ".naturalist Condon spent the entire day wttfl tl.-e 
Montana Conservation Caravan. There were 36 people in this party. 

Park Naturalist Beal gave a special talk entitled : -I*1 Mijesty - The 
Buffalo'' to the evenin campfire program at Canyon en Juno 27. 

All of the Self-guiding: Nature Trails were in operation by June 

. The full Interpretive program was put nto effect on June 19, and a coy 
of this program for the 1955 season is attached., Interpretive services were avail- 
able at Mammoth, Norris, Madison, Old I aithful, 'est Thumb, and Fishing Bridge on 
or before June 6. 

Some statistical information on personal Interpretive* &urYioes rendered 
is as follows! 



Station. 


Binf to .^m. i 


M/M fe*2& 


: ,ield .orvice 


Munoth 


1,116 


T&n 




Morris 




2,331 


2,661 


Tower Fall 






3,040 


Fishing Bridge 


5,155 


677 


630 


Old Faithful 


9,3eo 


6,522 


57,816 


Canyon 


2,ao 


501 


17,315 


Vest Thumb 


1,048 


1,852 


702 



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Ifgneica Activities and Exhibits 

The Old Faithful, Fishing Bridge, Madison, and Msamoth Museums were open 
all month. Norris >fuseum opened Juna 10. All these units have been heavily attended 
by park visitors. The attendance figures are as follows: 



Station, 


fuseuta Attendance 


Museum Talks 


S l£#5l 


10,521 


'-,539 


on Fftit&ha 


27,350 




Fishing Bridge 


15,610 


525 


Harris 


lt-,050 


2,320 


Mamaoth 


17,359 


918 



Speciroens for the Old Faithful exhibits were obtained durl> g the month 
■■fl I left it time was devoted to J 'ift assembling 9§ thee* C*teri*l*, ^cl:a;' : -^ t c. ., 
and shipping then to the Museum Labcxntory ir tngtoa, I). C, There vere flft 

bosses of rock specimens 3ent by express on June 13. 

T"-<3 lewi were not removed from the stf ge coaches on the Itetssaoth Museum 
porch until June 6, when it was determined that It was desirable to uncover them. 

CetaiG£ c.irds were rade t& the roc:: 3; cimens sent to the Museum Labo- 
ratory, In addition, a letter addressed to Mrs. Mury Shober and given to us Ijy Mr. 

illlam NichoUe tms aoceasioned along with a photostatic copy of a Union Pacific 
travel folio, which MM saade for us by Mr. Bqfets, 

The exhibits for the 'est Yellowstone 7r.f oraetion taticn arrived in the 
park on June 2jV, They vere unpacked and the orates www * pod back to the Museum 
Laboratory on Juno "'0. By ths end ©f the month the exhibits were bein; installed 
in the West Yellowstone Information Station. 

Park Naturalist Peal, assisted by Pari: nger Naturalist Rancher and the 
Wanlass brothers, took down the flag pole at Mhiieen Junction on Tune 9, stained 
it, put In a new rcpe, and pot It bacV up. 

Bark Naturalists Herkenfaam and Beal performed information desk duty early 
in the month at tko -iucaotl. ?*ui$*euw pending the arrival of seasonal personnel to 
take care of thee 3 duties. 

He search and Observe .tlpns 

During the month collecting permits were issued ae follows: 

June 6 - Paul H. linrlieh, University of Kansas 

June 6 - Floyd U . reston, University of Kansas 

June 23 - Carl S. Gilbert, Wyoming Agricultural Experimental Ctation 

June 23 - Tarold F. Kppaon, University of Wyoming 

June 26 - Krling Dorf , Princeton Qafveortity 

June 26 m Bruce E, ?<aoomber, Princeton University 

June 26 - Edward C. Jhnsen, Princeton University 

June 26 - Richard Wilts Scomber, rinceton UrJ.versity 

June 26 - Cha*les tf. Brown, rinceton University 

June 26 - Refer L. Burtner, Princeton University 

June 27 - Ikrtin L. Grant, Iowa State Teachers Collete 

June 27 - Wallace J. Hennessy, San Lorenzo fligh ;.,c>~'° 



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A grizely bear cub was killed at Canyon on June 7 and a yearling black 
bear was killed at West Yellowstone June IB, ENttftJj Town, son of Chief Ranger 
Brown, skinned these animalr- and prepared study skins. They will bo sent on in- 
definite loan to Walla Walla Cellftgi for study there. 

On June 9 and 11 C v .ief Rftiftl Naturalist Condon made field tripe to Old 
Faithful, best Yellowstone, and Gardiner, Montana, for the purpose of obtaining 
pictures for submission to the Director's office, in keeping with requests made by 
Mr. Stegner. 

On the evening of June 11 at about 8x25, Chief Park Naturalist Condon 
watched ft grizsly bear kill a calf elk in Elk -•■. The tw«r ohesed the calf 
some distance and finally killed it in the Gibbon ! liver ftsd took it out on the bank 
to eat it. There were cow elk and 1 other sup.11 calf which stood on the opposite 
bank of the stream watchii g the bear eat the J*WRSg fia.TJP. 

On June 10 the Chief feffe Naturalist tr.lkad with Mfc. Luc2an Iferris, Jr., 
of Atlanta, Georgia, about a permit to collect IsuKWts, Hr, Phrris was advised 

that it world be necessary for him to formlly apply for ft permit nnd that it be 
approved by the Superintendent. 

On Juno 14, oapphire "fool erupted violently at about 6*20 p.n # The eruption 
was witnessed by four emplcc.'eee of T lELmilton Storor '.rhr reported it to the Old Faith- 
ful Hanger Station. BftftaonftX Hanger listfWR went to the Blseuit Basin to investigate 
and found that the report was trtse. fftrk HfttaHttiffcft George fcferler and V^atuel beal, 

long with other personnel from Old faithful, wont t-~ the area ft orvatlons. 

A detailed report has beon prepared by seasonal '^-^r Lujan "rid is in the Yellow- 
stone Park files. 

The major geysers of tho Sppftr Geyser "r *n are performing in ft somewhat 
standard pftttern and large numbers of people in ' T una have been able to witness 
them in eruption. 

Dr. Erllug Dorf of Princeton University and his oarty of g»ologirt« 
arrived in the park on June 26. They established ' aadquarters at 'Roosevelt Lodge 
and e-scpect to operate out of there, limbers of * ■ rty workisg with I >. •. -orf 

on the fosrril forests of Yellowstone are C. W, BroWW ard g, C, "arsen Lnceton 

University, B, E, Scomber and R. Ifeeomber of ^ortliwestem University* and R » **, 
Burtner of r'ranklin and Marshall College. 

On a trip from Mammoth to the wouth Entrance on the morning of Jime 27 , 
Chief Park liaturalist Condon saw 26 bkek bear. These were obsarvad as follows: 

Maaaoth to Korris - 2 adult black Tear and 2 - 2\- year old brown- 

colored black bear 
Norris to >fetdison - 1 adult brov/n-colored black bear arid 2 adult 

black bear. , 

3 "mature brovn~colored black bear, and 4 mature 
felMk bear. 

West Thumb to South Entrance - 2 mature black bear and 2 mature 

brovn-colored black bear. 









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On Juno 30 the t-inacular disecting wiscroscope was leaned to Forester 
teynard Barrows for us© in the spruoe budworm study. 

Library 

B following lift shows publications received and the use of the library 
duri g the month: 

§Gfei j ' tn i iwi 31 

Mantieines received 29 

Pamphlet ■ received IB 

Hooks in circulation 37 

Boohs on indefinite loan -36 

Natural ? T ir*ory Association 

during the month the Association purchased an K-sakta camera with a wide 
angle lore, 50na len3, 139M tal*ph#fe© lens, and a bellows attachment. This entire 
unit cost tin Artx-jiaticn $7*29 32*. 

On Jure 7 and 8 Park Naturalists Her taWftWi and Condon conferred with 
Louis V. War 1 : i«no«r»ing the p* U on* of thf r«3H»tfstoi» Library and Museum 
Association. Itr. Clark if making a study of the publications prepared by the 
Associations in tifat various parks. 

Mrs- Lucille Wagner -*s siployed as LUspari l hi Yellowstone Library 

and Museum Association. Ibt arrived in the par 1 ;. '- 3fc entered on duty on 

June 1/.. 

Fifteen Vedc slides war* nent %e Grand 1 -ton t ftl Park to fill an 
order placed by then with the Association. 

The ^spociation purchased 3/° eo ies of ih# book Hoc. :. "ountaln Trees 
by Preston, These were rttftlvad at mil-Month. Since they were purchased at a 
herein price fro* the University of Iowa Press, tee price will be reduced by the 
Association. 

During the Witt a large number of mail orders were filled by rk Natu- 
ralist Herkenham and Clerk Alice Ovist. 

Clerk Alice Quirt was employed by the Association early in the w. nth. 
The balance of the month was devoted to substituting fox tea, Koore 

quipment and Sullies 

The new boxes for the public address Baits ■!' FtUthfulj Fii ridge, 

Lake, and Canyon were completed by the Carpenter Shop, and semi-permanent installa- 
tions have been mde at Old fftltlrftil obJ Fiahi '-'.<•. !*• cooperation was 
received frcra the carpenters and paint-era. 



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hotcttrrap hio, and Vi sual Aids, 

A large number of B x 10 enlargeraents were sent to the Director's office 
during the month. These were in coru'oxmnce with requests for photos Illustrating 
park conditions. 

Pictures were taken of tourist facili bias in G&rdl&ar and est Yellowstone 
on Jnne 9| n.nd of Yellowstone Park concessioners buildinge and road intrusions upon 
sacred areas on June 11, 

A Item motion rdcture projector :ind screen were loaned to John Gynn for 
Blister Hue* training on June 13 and to Assistant Chief Hanger Chapman for fire 
training purposes on June 20. Tli^s equipment MM returned OB June 30. 

A new screen was installed at Old Faithful AaphJ ir on Jury 15. This 

screen isUx 16 feet. A new screen was also :*r .vilec in the 015. Faithful Lodge 
on June 15. This screen is 20 x 15 feet. The old screens were put up at risking 
Bridge -\r& \ r est Thumb on June lb. 

A motion picture on birds tad a general ml on the vers Suited cm 

reviewed during the month arci pluced in final f om i'or shipment m June 29 to be 
duplicated. 

On June 29 a l,4.0G~foot reel HrltBglwg fca Ohiaf Saturallst Condon 

was gent to Rlak Spalls, of vtaticc in Lon . E la fi2a will be used 

on a TV program called "wanderlust". 

A sot of koria slides wero loaned to the Austri&s I&b&aay in .asiangtcn, 
D, C., for use in supplying illua orations for a iN&Haatltn being prepared in 
Austria. 

aapcetfulSjr 8ubai%ted| 



David de L. Condon 
Laf Bark Baturaliat 






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Canyon Outou>r Amphitheater: 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 10:30 a.m. 
Latter-Day Saints 7:00 p.m. 

Camp Roosevelt Lodge Lobby: 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 4:00 p.m. 
West Thumb Amphitheater : 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 8:00 A.M. 
West Thumb Recreation Hall: (Tuesday evening) 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 9:00 P.M. 

These religious services are to be announced each Saturday night at 
the campfire programs by seasonal park ranger naturalists and the information 
contained here is to be used at all museum and ranger station information desks. 

Printed schedules of church services for the 1955 season are posted 
on bulletin boards at all public use areas. Refer people to them. 

The Protestant services conducted by a National Parks Ministry at 
Mammoth, Canyon and Camp Roosevelt will be in charge of Student Minister William 

F. Henning and these at Old Faithful, West Thumb, Lake, and Fishing Bridge "ill 
be in charge of Student Minister Duane K. Murphy. These young men are spaasoi-ad 
by the National Council of the Churches of Christ and will "be available t? L week, 
each week, to render any aid they can to the park visitors and employees, Mr, 
Henning will be headquartered at Mammoth and Mr, Murphy at Old Faithful., Assist- 
ing these men will be student ministers H. Dana Fear on III at Canyon, and Hugh 

G. Anderson at Fishing Bridge. 

The afternoon and evening Protestant services at Fishing Bridge and 
Lake will be directed by Rev, R. N. Buswell of Cody, Wyoming. He will be 
assisted during the season by the following ministers: Ralph A. hicher, Ray 
Mattison, He rschel M artin, and Ronald Lundy, all from the Cody area. 

The Roman Catholic services will be under the direction of the Rev. 
Francis T. Penny of Cody, Wyoming. He will be assisted by Father Otho Sullivan 
and Father Bede Bradley, 

Latter-Day Saints services will be directed by missionaries from the 
St. Anthony, Idaho, Cody, Wyoming and Billings, Montana, missions. 

The Protestant ministers of the Park County Ministerial Association 
who vrill conduct morning services at Old Faithful are: 

June 19 Reverend Robert Dunn 

June 26 Reverend Arthur Seebart or Louis Qrtmayer 

July 3 Reverend Forrest Clark 

July 10 Reverend Louis Ortmayer 

July 17 Reverend Forrest Clark 

July 2U Reverend Don Redf ield 

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July 31 Reverend F, Uarren Strain 

August 7 Reverend Arthur W, Seebart 

August L4 Reverend Arthur W, Seebart or Louis Qrtmayer 

August 21 Reverend G, Melvin Walker 

August 28 Reverend Don Redfield 

September A Reverend Robert Dunn 



There will in all probability be inquiries fron peoole concerning the 
time of church services at West Yellowstone and Gardiner, Montana, There will 
be Roman Catholic services in West Yellowstone in Our Lady of the Pines Roman 
Catholic Church on Sundays at 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. The Roman Catholic services 
in Gardiner will be held in the St. Williams Chapel each Sunday at 7=00 a.m. 
Roman Catholic services will be held in Cooke City each Sunday during July and 
August at 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. There will be Protestant services in Wes'o Yellow- 
stone at 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. each Sunday from June 12 through August 28. 

This circular is supplied you so that you will be able to properly 
inform the visitors on all religious services planned for the 1955 season. 

Edmund B. Rogers 
Superintendent 



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YELLO -ISTONE NATIONAL PARK 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



GENERAL INDOCTRINATION COURSE 
SEASONAL UNIFORMED PERSONNEL 



Place: Canteen, Mammoth 

TIME SUBJECT 



Dates June 15, 1955 

INSTRUCTOR 



MORNIi' 



8:00 - 8:30 
8:30 - 9:00 



Welcome to Yellowstone 
and to Conference 



Superintendent Rogers 



Basic employment data: Salary; 
pay periods, deductions from salary; 
Medical Plan; Annual and Sick leave; 
Overtimej Quarters; Uniform allowance; 
Shopping facilities; Church; Dental 



service 



Payroll Supervisor Moore 



9:00 - 10:00 

10:00 - 10:10 
10:10 - 10:25 

10:25 - 10:35 

10:35 - 11:00 

11:00 - 11:30 

11:30 - 12:00 

12:00 - 1:00PM 

AFTE :NQ0N 
1:00 - 1:30 

1:30 - 1:1*5 

1:15 - 2:1*5 



Functions, objectives and policies 

of the National Park Service Chief Ranger Brown 

RECESS Show of hands for meal check 



Organization of the 
National Park Service 

Yellowstone National Fark 
Organization and Operations 

Protection Division 

Interpretive Division 

Other Operational Divisions 

LUNCH HOUR 

Concessions Operations 

Cooperating Government Agencies 

Investigative jurisdiction of 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
in Yellowstone; conduct of 
cooperative criminal 
inve st igations 



Assistant Chief Ranger Garry 
Superintendent Rogers 

t 

Chief Ranger Brown 
Chief Park Naturalist Condon 
Assistant Superintendent Hamilton 

Administrative Assistant Joffe 
Chief Ranger Brown 



Special Agent, 

Butte Office of Federal 

Bureau of Investigation 



2:1*5 - 2:55 RECESS 



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3:25 - Ii:l5 

{Hi* - U:U5 
U:l£ - 5:00 

EVEUIHG 
8:00 - 9:20 



Jurisdiction in Yellowstone 
and function of Resident 
United States Commissioner 

Characteristics of the 
Yellow stone Visitor j and 

Information Service to 
fulf j.ll visitor needs 

Public Safety responsibilities 

Employee Attitudes 



Significance and outstanding 
features of Yellowstone. 
Plans for two day tour 



U. S, Commissioner Brown 



Chief Park Naturalist Condon 
District Ranger Reynolds 
Chief Ranger Brown 



Chief Park Naturalist Condon 



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PRE-SEASON TRAINING TRIP 
FOR 
SEASONAL UNIFORMED PERSONNEL 

June 16 and 17, 1955 



Thursday - June 16. 1955: 



8:00 A.M. Group assemble at Headquarters Museum, 
Explanation of the procedures to be 
followed on trip, 

8:10 A.M. Buses loaded and trip underway. 

8:30 A .M. Swan Lake Flat. Story of the Gallatin 
Range - Geography, Geology, Biology of 
general area viewed from this point. 

8:55 A.M. Meose Exhibit, Willow Park. Story of 
Moose, Beaver - Origin of such willow 
parks - value of wayside exhibits. 

9:15 A.M. Apollinaris Spring. Story of Cold 

Spring - Brief comment on trees of the 
plateau. 

9:30 A.M. Obsidian Cliff and Exhibit. Short story 
about obsidian - its origin, uses and 
its significance as a geological oddity, 

9:50 A.M. Roaring Mountain - story in the bus. 

10:00 A.M. Nymph Lake, Sandhill Crane - story in 
the bus. 

10:10 A.M. Norris Geyser Basin: 

Trip over north basin trail (25 

minutes) 
Museum talk and review (10 

minutes ) 
Trip to Steamboat Geyser and brief 
on Self -guiding trail. 

11:05 A.M. Chocolate ?ots, Gibbon Cascades - slow 
passing - story in bus, 

11:20 A.M. Beryl Spring - story in the bus. 

11:35 A.M. Gibbon Falls - view from middle observa- 
tion point if possible to swing buses in 
and out. Bus story. 

11:50 A.M. Tuff Cliff - Bus story. 

11:55 A.M. Terrace Spring - Bus story. 



Park Naturalist 
Condon 



Park Naturalist 
Herkenham 



Park Naturalist 
David Beal 



Park Naturalist 
Condon 



Park Naturalist 
Herkenham 



Park Ranger Naturalist 
Dr. Arthur Nash 
Park Naturalist 
David Beal 
Park Naturalist 
David Beal 



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12:00 Noon Lunch stop - Madison Junction Campground, 
(sack lunches) 

12:45 P.M. Historical Museum, Madison Junction 

A, National Park History 

B, National Park Service History Park Naturalist 

C, National Park Service Policies Condon 

and Ideals 

1:20 P.M. Firehole Falls and Canyon - story in 
buses 

1:4.0 P.M. Nez Perce Creek. Story of the Nez Perce 

retreat and incidents associated with it Park Ranger Naturalist 
which occurred in Yellowstone. Dr. M. D. Beal 

2*00 P.M. Fountain Paint Pots. Morning Geyser, Park Naturalist 
Clepsydra Geyser and Fountain Geyser. H. T. Lystrup 

2:25 P.M. Firehole Lake - story in buses 

2:30 P.M. White Dome - Great Fountain and Surprise 
Pool. 

2:4-5 P.M. Excelsior Geyser - Grand Prismatic. Trip Park Ranger Naturalist 
through Midway Geyser Basin. Ted Parkinson 

3:10 P.M. Trip through Biscuit Basin, catching Park Naturalist 
Sapphire and Jev/el in eruption. Herkenham 

3:35 P.M. Morning Glory - Vandalism and its Park Naturalist 
effects . Condon 

3:4-5 P.M. Grotto, Giant, Daisy - Black Sand Basin. 
Story from the buses. 

Park Naturalist 
4:00 P.M. Greater Geyser Hill walk. George D, Marler 

5:30 P.M. Old Faithful Lodge - cabin assignments. 

6:15 P.M. Dinner - Old Faithful Mess. 

7:00 P.M. Round table discussion (location to be 
announced ) 

A. The uniform - when, where and how District Ranger 
to wear it. Tom Ela 

B. Naturalist Evening Programs. Park Naturalist 

Condon 

C. Yellowstone Library and Museum Park Naturalist 
Association. Herkenham 

D Visual and audio equipment - its Park Naturalist 
use and care. David Beal 

E. Concessioners and the5.r facilities. Ass't. Chief Ranger 

F. Government Property Tom Garry 

1. Issuance, use, responsi- Park Naturalist 
bility and accountability. David Beal 



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2, Care and maintenance of motor 

vehicles - mechanical equip- Park Naturalist 
ment. Condon 

G. Preparation of reports and station 
records : 

1. statistical reports 

2. Daily records - new notebook, 
issue at meeting 

3. Monthly report Park Naturalist 

4. Recommendations etc. Condon 

Friday - June 17, 1955: 

7:00 A.M. Breakfast - Old Faithful Hess. 

8:00 A.M. Buses leave Old Faithful 

8:15 A.M. Kepler Cascades. Rhyolite Flows - origin Park Naturalist 
of Waterfalls and Cascades. Condon 

8:35 A.M. Shoshone Point. Talk on Lakes of Yel- 
lowstone - other National Parks, em- 
phasis on neighbor park, Grand Teton Park Naturalist 
National Park. Herkenham 

Timber line Trees. White Bark Pine - Ass't. Chief Ranger 
Blister Rust - Forest Management. Hal Edwards 

9:20 A.M. West Thumb Geyser Basin. Trip through 

Basin - Potts' letters - Absoraka Moun- Park Ranger Naturalist 
tains - Lake, Dr. William Fischer 

10:4-5 A.M. Lake Fish Hatchery. The story of spawn 

talcing - fish trapping and artificial Fish & Wildlife or 

propogation - exam .nation of specimens Park Ranger Naturalist 

in the acquarium. Fred B. Turner 

Fishing Bridge Museum, Talk on Birds of Park Naturalist 
Lake area and review of Museum exhibits Dr. Lowell Biddulph 

Sack lunch in the Fishing Bridge Amphitheater. 

Leave for Lake Butte. Pelican Creek - 
Squaw Lake - stories in buses 

Lake Butte. Review of Yellows tone's 

Natural Resources and values they have Park Naturalist 

for the people. Condon 

Mud Volcano Area, seeing: Black Dragon's 

Caldron, Mud Volcano, Dragon's Mouth and Park Ranger Naturalist 

Sulphur Caldron. Joe Catmull 

River overlook at Alum Creek. Story of Park Naturalist 
Hayden Valley - River - Bison, David Beal 



11:30 A.M. 


12:00 Noon 


12:45 P.M. 


1:20 P.M. 


2:45 P.M. 


3:30 P.M. 



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4:00 P.M. Artist Point. Story of Grand Canyon - 

Geological interpretation - scenic Park Naturalist 
grandeur, Wayne Replogle 

4.:30 P.M. Lookout Point. Story of Uncle Tom f a 
Trail - Red Reck Trail - Stairway to 

Brink of Falls - Moran and his interpre- Park Naturalist 
tations of the Canyon. Herkenham 

5:00 P.M. Inspiration Point. Osprey and other 

birds of the canyon - Construction of new 

observation facilities - a review of the Park Ranger Naturalist 

Evergreens of the park. Robart Jonas 

6:15 P.M. Dinner - Canyon Mess. 

6:4.0 P.M. Leave for Mammoth. 

7:00 P.M. Dunraven Pass area - story in the buses 

7:25 P.M. Tower Fall. Geological story of the Park Naturalist 
Canyon and Falls - Specimen Ridge. Condon 

7:50 P.M. Petrified Tree - story of fossil forests Park Naturalist 

David Beal 

8:15 P.M. Hell Roaring Overlook above Insect Infes- 
tation area - wildlife problems and man- Chief Ranger 
agement policies. Otto Brown 

9:00 P.M. Arrive back at Mammoth. 

TRAINEES ARE EXPECTED TO: 

!• B e punctual and orderly in loading and unloading. 

2 « Pay attention . Be alert. Take notes if they will be of later value, 
(use back of these sheets if you do not have a notebook) 

3. Ask questions . Avoid horse play. 

4-. Make suggestions to leaders if points are not clear or are missed. 

5. Capitalize on the information made available. 

The following sources of information are available to you: 

1. An information manual on Yellowstone National Park, 

2. Park Ranger Administrative Manuals on: 

(a) General Park organization 

(b) Duties and instructions 

(c) Park regulations 

(d) Information and policies 

(e) District boundaries 

(f ) Yellowstone forest fire plan and guide 



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3. Park Ranger Checking Station Manual. 

4. Report Manual, giving details on: 

(a) Wildlife reports 

(b) Fores cry ant'. I'n.r.-e protection reports 

(c) Acoidort reports (all types) 

(d) Checking station reports 

(e) Miscellaneous reports 

(f ) Travel regulations and reports 

(g) Issuance of Permits 

5. Red Cross first aid text book. 

6. For Fire Protection and Fighting: 

(a) Fire protection training handbook 

(b) Western Fire Fighters guide 

7. Yellowstone Trail Manual. 

8. Station library consisting of good books on Natural History, Western 
History and especially all outstanding key publications on Yellowstone, 

These manuals and source material can be obtained from: 

(a) Headquarters Research Library at Mammoth 

(b) Your immediate field station library 

(c) District Rangers 1 offices 



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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



PROGRAM OF INTERPRETIVE SERVICES 
1955 SEASON 



June 10, 1955 



The program of interpretive services to be in effect for the 1955 season 
in Yellowstone National Park is as follows: 



MUSEUM HOURS 
INFORMATION DESK 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



GUIDED WALKS 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



MAMMOTH 

8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He answers questions and sells 
literature on the national parks. 

The park ranger naturalist en desk duty gives museum 
talks whenever enough visitors \-iho are interested in 
obtaining interj -relive information are pre. j fn : : to 
call them together. Muset.a tillrs are given &acb 
time bus parties arrive at the museum. VThen t->ie work 
load will permit, two men should be in the museum 
during rush hours, 

NATURE WALK. - Exploring the terraces and woodlands. 
Leaves the headquarters museum 8:00 a.m. and Liberty 
Cap at 8:15 a.m. This walk follows the route of the 
Terrace Forest trail from Liberty Cap to Narrow Gauge 
Terrace, thence to Clematis Gulch and down Clematis 
Gulch. The trip is completed by 11:00 a.m. 

TERPoiCE WALKS - To interpret and view thermal phenomena, 
Morning trips 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 a.m., beginning 
from Liberty Cap. Afternoon trips at 1:00, 2:00, and 
3:00 p.m. These terrace walks are to be taken over the 
lower portion of the Mamioth Hot Spring Terraces and 
return to Liberty Cap. 

C LEMATIS GULCH SELF-GUIDING TRAIL - maintained by the 
Mammoth naturalist staff. It is a self -guiding trail 
which begins at the mouth of Clematis Gulch and con- 
tinues up this gulch for about 1/2 mile, crosses the 
ridge to the vicinity of Narrow Gauge Terrace and 
returns to Liberty Cap via the old Norris road. There 
will be no guided trips on this trail, but it is well- 
signed with interpretive labels for the use of all 
park visitors who care to travel the trail at their 
leisure. 



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AUTO CARAVANS 



TERRACE CaRAVAN - Begins at the headquarters museum 
at 2:00 p. a. Goes over the upper terraces visiting 
Main Terrace, Prospect Terrace, Soda Spring, and 
terminates at Angel Terrace. 

WILDLIFE SEARC H CARAVAN - begins at the headquarters 
museum at 6:30 p.m. and returns to the campfire circle 
by 8:00 p.m. Visitors drive their own cars. Moose, 
antelope, deer and other animal life may be seen on 
this trip. The road follows the main highway from 
Mammoth to Uillow Park or over other road sections if 
it becomes desirable to use them in order to seek wilcU 
life. The time of this activity may be advanced to an 
earlier hour in the evening in the late season. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Each evening a program is held in the Mammoth outdoor 
amphitheater across from the Chapel from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. 
This is a short campfire talk illustrated with colored 
slf.des or motion pictures. 

NORRIS GEYSER BASIN 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 

SERVICES 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk during 
museum hours. He answers questions and provides other 
interpretive services. 

Short museum talks are given to groups of people who 
assemble at the museum and to bus parties at the time 
of their arrival there. 



GUIDED WALKS 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



There are geyser walks conducted by park ranger natur- 
alists over the main geyser basin loop trail in the 
morning and afternoon won the arrival of bus tour 
parties. Additional trios will be made whenever 
there are large enough groups of motorists or special 
parties which have assembled and who are interested 
in such guide service. 

GREEN D RAGON SPRING SELF- GUIDING TRAIL - a well-labeled 
self-guiding geyser and nature trail. It is maintained 
by the park ranger naturalist at Morris , This trail 
has two routes that can be followed - a short trip of 
one mile, or the entire southern Norris geyser basin 
loop of 1-3/4- miles. 



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MUSEUM HOURS 
GUIDED TRIPS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



EVENING CAMFFIRE 
PROGRAM 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



GUIDED WALKS 



GEYSER TALIS 



MADISON JUNCTION 

7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

Special hikes will be organized and conducted from 
this station as work time available permits. 

A park ranger naturalist is on duty at the information 
desk during ooen hours to answer questions and sell 
publications . 

The park ranger naturalist on duty gives short museum 
talks on the history of the park, The Park Service 
and the development of the National Park system to bus 
parties, special groups and whonaver there are enough 
visitors assembled to provide ar audience. 

There is an inf ormal campf ire program at the campf ire 
circle each evening from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

OLD FAITHFUL 

8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk during 
museum hours. He answers questions and sells literature 
on the national parks, 

NATURE WALK - exploring Geyser Hill and the forest trail 
to Observation Point. The trip begins at Old Faithful 
cono ; ;U-ives at 8:00 a.m and returns to Old Faithful 
Geyser cone at 11:00 a, .a. 

GEYSER H ILL WALKS - exploring Goyser Hill. Route of 
travel is over Geyser Hill, down to Lion group end return 
to Old Faithful. Trips fcfter each eruption of Old 
Faithful Geyser from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

NOTICE: AH walks begin from Old Faithful Geyser cone 
and announcements of these walks will be made in the 
Old Faithful museum by the naturalist at the information 
desk. The Naturalist conducting them will announce them 
at Old Faithful cone talk, 

CONS TALKS - The naturalist conducting the walk from Old 
Faithful cone will present short 10-15 minute talks pre- 
ceding each daylight eruption of this geyser. 



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GEYSER OBSERVATIONS 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



EVENING TALKS PROGRAM 



ILLUMINATED ERUPTION 
OF OLD FAITHFUL 



GUIDED WALKS 



GEYSER BASIN INFORMA- 
TION AND PROTECTION 
PATROL 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



FIELD TALKS - at every opportunity park ranger naturalists 
give geyser talks to the assembled crowds at the eruptions 
of major geysers. 

Park ranger naturalists stationed at Old Faithful will 
be expected to make geyser observations daily and post 
major geyser eruntion times in the Old Faithful museum 
and on the announcement boards at the geyser. 

GENTIAN SE L F-GUIDING NATURE TRAIL - begins at the Fire- 
hole River bridge crossing and parallels Geyser Hill 
for a distance of l/2 nile, coming out near Beach Spring, 
Travel can be either direction on this trail. Labeling 
of this trail is done by the naturalist staff at Old 
Faithful. 

CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - Held in the Old Faithful amphitheater 
from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a short campfire talk 
illustrated with colored slides or motion pictures. 

OLD FAIT HFUL LODGE. TALK - Each evening except on Sundays 
there will be an illustrated talk given in the Old 
Faithful Lodge ilecroation hall from 7*30 to 8:?0 p.m. 

The first eruption of Old Faithful occurring after 9:00 
p.m. will be illuminated. Prior to the illuminated 
eruption a short geyser talk will be given by a park 
ranger naturalist, 

WEST THUMB 

NATURE WALK - begins at the West Thumb ranger station 
and travels over the footpath of the thermal area, 
and then along the forst paths, up the lake shore to 
Occasional Geyser and return. The wall: begins at 
8:15 a.m. and returns by 11:15 a.m, 

GEYSER BASIN WALKS - regular guided trips are made 
through the West Thumb geyser basin at the time of the 
arrival of the scheduled bus tours. Walks will be con- 
ducted by the park ranger naturalist on duty whenever 
he can assemble a party. 

There is a park ranger naturalist on duty in the geyser 
basin from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. He will conduct the 
geyser basin walks and the balance of the time he will 
be on information duty and basin patrol. 

Held in the West Thumb campground amphitheater from 
8:00 to 9? 00 p.m. This will be a short campfire talk 
illustrated with colored slides or motion pictures. 



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MUSEUM HOURS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



GUIDED WALKS 



AUTO CARAVAN 



THERMAL OBSERVATIONS 



EVENING TALKS 



GUIDED WALKS 



FISHING BRIDGE 

8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. 
Open 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk during 
museum hours. He will answer questions and sell 
literature on the national parks. 

The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives museum 
talks whenever enough visitors who are interested in 
obtaining interpretive information are present to call 
them together. Museum talks are given each time bus 
parties arrive at the museum. 

NATU RE WALK - begins at the Fishing Bridge museum, 
explores the lake shore area and explores the swamp 
near Fishing Bridge. The walk begins at 8:30 a.m. and 
should return to the museum by 11:30. On the trip people 
should learn the biology of the Lake area, geolcjy of 
the Lake area and should have an opportunity to see plant 
life forms and an interesting array of animals. 

NATURE WALK AT LAKE - starts at the Lake Ledge at 
9:00 a.m. and returns by 11:00 a.m. The route to be 
followed is the old Elephant Back trail. 

An auto caravan of persons driving their own cars and 
led en the trip by a park ranger naturalist leaves 
Fishing Bridge museum daily at 2:00 p.m. and returns 
by 4:00 p.m. This trip takes park visitors to the Lake 
fish hatchery and as far as the Natural Bridge. After 
the fish hatchery closes in the late season trips go 
to Lake Butte. 

Park ranger naturalists at Fishing Bridge will patrol 
the Mud Volcano area and render information service, 

EVENING CAHFFIR5 PROGRAM - held in the Fishing Bridge 
amphitheater from 3:00 to 9:00 p.m. It is a short camp- 
fire talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures, 

LAKE LODGE TALK - held in the Lake Lodge recreation 
hall from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. except on Sundays, It is 
a short talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures, 

CANYON 

NORTH RIM TRIPS - route followed will be one of the park 
ranger nationalist's choice, and may be any one of the 
following: exploring the Canyon-Cascade Creek trail, the 
guided trip do\m Red Rock trail or the bear cave camp- 



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INTERPRETIVE SERVICE 
AT OBSERVATION POINTS 



ground nature trail. All trips begin at the Canyon 
ranger station at 8:30 a.m. and return to this point 
by 11:30 a.m. 

SOUTH RIM TRIP - This is the adventurous and thrilling 
hike clown Uncle Tom's trail to the canyon bottom at the 
base of the Lower Falls. This walk starts at Canyon 
Lodge at 3:30 a.m. and returns by 11:30 a^m. 

Seasonal park ranger naturalists are stationed daily at 
Grand View cr Lookout Point and at Artist foint from 
1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p,m. These men provide inuvi'pr-'tation, 
information and help to park visitors,, They present 
short talks which interpret the Canyon's scenic grandeur 
and geology to any and all groups that ? m. V. -tssembled. 
In addition, they serve the protective function of 
looking after the public's safety. 



EVENING TALKS 



GUIDED WALKS 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE 
AT OBSERVATION POINT 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



EVENING PROGRAM 



CANYON EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - this pr-gram will be 
conducted in the Canyon campground anphithoat-fr from 
3:00 to 9:00 p.m. It is a short campfire t=ilk illus- 
trated x/ith colored slides or motion pictures. 

TOWER FALL 

Nature walk exploring Lost Creek is a naturalist guided, 
nature trail hike which leaves the lodge t Camp Roose- 
velt daily at 8:4.5 a.m. and returns by 11:15 cm. This 
is one of the outstanding trails in the park for 
flowers, birds, mammals and scenic landscapes. When 
there are no hiking parties the naturalist will provide 
information service at the observation ooint at Touer 
Fall. 

The park ranger naturalist stationed at T o\v r er Fall 
serves the park visitors at the Tower Fall observation 
platform from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. He meets the 
people and provides them with an interpretation of the 
landscape and information on Yellowstone, 

The Lost Falls self -guiding nature trail winds up Lost 
Creek to Lost Falls, The nature labels along this 
trail will be maintained by the park ranger naturalist 
stationed at Tower Fall, 

Each evening in the lobby of Camp Roosevelt Lodge at 
8:15 p.m. there will be a short talk, illustrated 
with colored slides or motion pictures. 



The scheduled interpretive activities for any station are not to be 
changed until the proposed changes have been reviewed and approved by the Chief 
Park Naturalist, The program as outlined here should be adequate to meet the 



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interpretive needs of the public during the 1955 season. If this program 
can be improved by changes in scheduled activities, or by the addition of activi- 
ties your suggestions will be welcomed in the Chief Park Naturalist's office, 

REFER TO THIS SCHEDULE UHEN YOU ARE IN DOUBT AS TO TEE TIME AM TYPE 
OF ACTIVITIES THAT ARE BEING CONDUCTED AT THE VARIOUS INTERPRETIVE STATIONS 
THROUGHOUT THE PARK. 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park August 10, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist 
Monthly Report, July 1955 

Special Activities and Conferences 

On July 5 Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a special meeting in 
the Park Engineer's office, at which a final decision was made an the completion 
of the West Entrance Information Station. Those attending this Meeting weret 
Messrs. Mclfollink Wohlbrandt, Brown, Mattson, 71. Biastock, Hamilton, and Condon. 

On July 6 a thorough review was made of the Yellowstone Park bus 
schedules. A number of suggestions were made concerning these schedules in 
order to correct place names and other factual data which was in error. Thsss 
suggestion? were turned over to Mr. Joffe. 

Several memoranda were prepared on July 13 and submitted to the 
Assistant Superintendent. These suggestions concerned park problems and pro- 
posed action which could be taken to improve facilities in thermal areas. 

On July 10 Chief Park Naturalist Condon met Ronald Lee, Chief of the 
Division of Interpretation, H. Raymond Gregg, Regional Chief of Interpretation, 
and Dr. Carl P. Russell, Field Naturalist, at Old Faithful and spent the day in 
their company visiting the sites of proposed roadside exhibits and the West 
Entrance Information Station. In conjunction with their stay here, a special 
conference was held in the Superintendents office on the mornings of July 11 
and 12 to discuss fisheries problems. Messrs. Rogers* Lee, Gregg, Hamilton, 
Brown,.Kittams, and Condon were present at these meetings. On the afternoon 
of July 11 Dr. Russell, Frank Mattson, and David Condon had a lengthy conference 
on wayside exhibits in the Chief Park Naturalist *a office. The "Wild Animal 
Heaven" movie was shown to Messrs. Lee, Gregg, and Russell on the evening of 
July 11. On July 12. the Chief Park Naturalist accompanied Lee, Gregg, and 
Russell to Canyon, Fishing Bridge, Lake, and West Thumb. At that time they 
reviewed matters associated with the development of the interpretive program 
in Yellowstone and physical facilities which might be needed to further this 
service to the people. Lee, Gregg, and Russell left via the South Entrance. 

On July 28 Par:. Naturalist Iferkenham had a conference with Miss 
Harriett Vernon and Miss Eleanor Johnson, who were representing the Girl Scout 
All-State Encampment. Final details were worked out for an itinerary for this 
special geological group, consisting of 16 girls and their leaders, who will 
visit Yellowstone in August. 

Programs were audited as follows: 

Beal: Madison Junction - July 5 

Herkenhami Old Faithful - July 10 









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Condon i Mammoth - July 9 

Lake Lodge - July IU 

Mammoth • July 18 

Old Faithful - July 19 

Mammoth - July 22 

Old Faithful - July 26 

Canyon - July 2B 

Oa July 18 Mr. W. E. Garst was in the Chief Park Naturalist's office 
and discussed photography in Yellowstone. Mr. Garst is a free-lance photographer 
and ie taking movies and stills. His operational base is Douglas, Wyoming, 

Religious S ervlees and Chawl Use 

On July 6 the Chief Park Naturalist conferred with Mr. William Harming 
about the religious services as conducted by the Student Ministry. 

During the month pictures -were taken s£ Kfr« Henning and other per- 
sonnel associated with the Student Ministry program for the purpose of pro- 
viding illustrative materials for an article which is to appear in Presbyterian 
Life . These pictures were sent to that magasinc on July 15. 

The regular church services were held in the Yellowstone National Park 
Chapel each Sunday in keeping with the established schedule. Roman Catholics, 
Protestants, and Latter Day Saints used the Chapel. The Chapel was also used 
for choir rehearsals and for the Bible Story Hour for younger children. 

In-Service Training 

Programs were audited by permanent personnel and by the senior natura- 
lists at field stations, and conferences were held with the personnel which have 
assisted in training them to provide better public service from the standpoint 
of park Interpretation. 

At 10 j 00 p.m. on the evening of July 12, Park Naturalists Beal, Herken- 
ham, and Condon attended a training conference for all personnel employed at the 
Hindquarters station and went over problems associated with the interpretive 
program at Mammoth. 

During the month the booklets, Camnf Ire Programs and Employee's hand- 
book, were issued to each of the seasonal Park Hanger Naturalists and other 
personnel in the Interpretive Division as in-service training aids. 






Chief Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month. Park Naturalist 
Herkenham was on duty all month. Park Naturalist Beal was on duty all month. 
Clerk-Stenographer Moore was on annual leave through July 5, when she returned 
to duty, and was on duty the balance of the month. Mrs. AHee Quist substituted 
for Mrs. Moore until July 5. All of the seasonal personnel were on duty all month 
with the exception of one day»s dental leave taken by George Marler. 



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Bark Ranger Naturalist Donald C. Stewart used hie personal automobile 
for transportation from Madison to Norris and return and was paid a mileage 
rate for this transportatiffla. Hs functioned as relief man at Norris. 

The 21 seasonal Parle Ranger Naturalists who did not have their driving 
licenses obtained these early in July. 

The tours of duty for all positions were established on a stabilized 
basis early in July and will continue through the season. 

On July 30 the Chief Park Naturalist interviewed Mr. Dwaine Anderson 
of Old Faithful, who is a zoology major, and Mr, Bernard R. McClelland, who will 
graduate from the School of Recreational Forestry, Colorado Agricultural College, 
Fort Collins, concerning employment as Park Ranger Naturalists. Both men appear 
to be good candidates for the 1956 season. 

Interpretive Cervices 

The full Interpretive Program, as set up and submitted with the June 
report for the Division, was active during the month of July. All phases of the 
program were well attended by the park visitors. The inclim*^ weather was not 
such that it interferred appreciably with the program, and statistical information 
indicates that the use of the interpretive facilities during July 1955 was even 
greater than in previous years. 

The Lost Falls Self-guiding Trail at Roosevelt Lodge has been very well 
maintained during the month and has proven very popular with visitors in that 
area. Mr. Stevens is to be commended for his work on this trail. Dr. Nash at 
Norris, Wallace Hennessy at Mammoth, and Simon Simonian at Old Faithful are also 
to be commended for maintaining fine self -guiding trails at these stations. These 
units have all proven to be popular with park visitors. 

Park Naturalist Beal appeared on a travel program over KFI, Log? Angeles, 
on July A. Mr. Beal was called on the long distance telephone and apparently his 
replies were such that they went over the -Ir as part of the regular program. 

Special programs were given during the month as follows J 

Dr. Erling Dorf presented a talk on the Geology of Yellowstone 
at Roosevelt Lodge on July 12. 

Park Naturalist Beal gave a talk on Geyserland in Winter at 
Mammoth on July 31. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon gave talks at Mammoth on July 21 
and at Old Faithful on July 30. 

On July 24 Chief Park Naturalist Condon spent the entire day serving 
as the eyes for A0 blind people from the Montana State College Simmer School for 
Adult Blind. This party entered the park through the West Entrance and left via 
North Entrance. 



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Public address units were given permanent installations at Fishing Bridge, 
Old Faithful, and Mammoth, and have proven to be very successful. 

Park Ranger Naturalist Joseph R. Murphy made a tracing of a map of the 
Lower Terraces. Copies of the map were printed for the Division by t-e Engineering 
office. The prints were framed under glass ar^ installed at Liberty Cap and 
Cavern Spring. These naps have proven to be very helpful to park visitors in 
assisting them to properly use the walks in the Lower Terrace area. 

Some statistical information on personal interpretive services rendered 
is as follows! 

Station Camnf ire Talks Guided Trips Field Service 

Mammoth 1,653 11,221 

Norris 10,732 12,830 

Tower Fall 3,501 189 15,291 

Fishing Bridge 20,c»0 1,54.7 1,730 

Old Faithful 43,190 21,006 264,368 

Canyon 11,725 2,035 99,450 

West Thumb 5,012 9,530 1,491 

Madison 1,506 103 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 

All five of the park stations were open in conformance with the 
scheduled hours set up in the program for 1955. v ach of them proved to be very 
popular with perk visitors and were well attended from early morning to late 
evening. The attendance figures are as follows j 

Station Museum, Attendance Museum^ Talks 
Mammoth 34,275 2^7 
Norris 31,950 12,483 
Fishing Bridge 29,875 375 

Old Faithful 139,500 
Madison 29,003 7,264 

The rock specimens which have accumulated in the rear of the Museum and 
In the basement were sorted and stored on July 3 by Park Naturalist Ilerkenham. 

Indian artifacts found by Cr«don at the buffalo jump were accessioned. 

New boxeB were installed for the storage and protection of all public 
address units and projectors at Old Faithful, Fishing Bridge, and Mammoth. This 
was done under the direction of Park Naturalist Beal. 

On July 6 the relief map which was in Mr. Joffe's office was moved to 
Norris. This map interprets the geology of Yellowstone. The relief map with the 
cultural information that was in the Norris station was moved to the West Entrance 
Information Station on thiB same day. Thir particular map was damaged before 
moving and suffered some further damage before installation was completed at West 
Yellowstone. Park Naturalist Beal, assisted by Morton A, Boss and his wife at 
West Yellowstone, have repaired the relief map at the Information Station. 



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The Museum basoiaent was cleaned up and rearranged on July 8 by Park 
Naturalist Beal and Janitor Davis. Considerable debris -was hauled to the dtwp. 

Research and Observations 

Oh July A a field trip was wade over the old road to Tower Fall, across 
Blacktail Beer Plateau. At that tiae good colored photographs were obtained of 
31 different species of flowerlnr plants, I6rea motion pictures were also obtained. 
T is work was done by Chief Bark Naturalist Condon. 

Count Fred Hartlg, a representative of the American Museum of Natural 
History L i r ork and a director of the National Institute of Entomology in 
Rome, Italy, arrived in Yellowstone on July A. He was taken around the lower 
loop on July 8 by Chief Park Naturalist Condon and to the top of Mount Washburn 
on July 14. Count fiartig is collecting insects and had a very successful expe- 
rience in Yellowstone. An assistant, Kiss A. Baehnan, was with hia. They left 
Yellowstone on July 19. Before leaving, the Count went over Insect collecting 
procedures with C ief Park Naturalist Condon and left a black light with hia to 
be used at night for collecting. 

On July 12 a record was kept of the number of bear observed in traveling 
from Mammoth around the loop via Tower Fall, Lake, Thumb, .%dison, and to Mammoth. 
Apparently this was an exceptionally good day for bear along the roadsides, and 
the following figures were noted? 



Road Area 
Ifeamoth-Tower Fall 


Color 
Black 


Mature 

3 


Cuba 

a 


Total 
5 




Brown 


2 




2 


Tower Fall-Canyon 


Black 


7 


2 


9 




Brown 


7 


2 


9 


Can. Jet. -Artist Pt. 


Blade 


3 


2 


5 


Can. Jet .-Lake 


Blaek 


A 


1 


5 




Brown 


3 


1 


A 


take-West Thumb 


Black 


6 


3 


■: 




Brown 


2 


1 


3 


W. Thumb-Old Faithful 










Black 


5 


3 


u 




Brown 


2 


1 


3 


O.F.-Madison Jet. 


Bl 


7 


3 


10 




Brown 




1 


1 


Mad.Jct.-Norrls 


Black 


1 




I 




Brown 


1 




1 


Korris-Jfemaoth 


Black 


3 




3 




Brown 


O 


TOT*L 


2 
11 



During the month collectin* permits were issued as follows % 

July 1 - Br. Fred Rartig, American Musewa of Natural History 
July 5 - Br. James IT. Pepper, Montana State College 
July 13 - Nicholas M. Chart, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
July 26 - Rupert B. Lowe, Jr., Princeton University 



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On July 15 the Chief Pari . Naturalist made movies and kodaslides of the 
spruce budworm spraying operations being done out of the Gardner airport. A 
flight was made over the northern section of the park. Piotures were obtain** 
of the country-side as seen from the air. >fany of these will make excellent 
contributions to the Yellowstone collection. 

On July 16 at AsOO -p.m. V ief Park Naturalist Condon witnessed a rather 
unusual occurrence when the pair of trumpeter swan on Swan Lake left the lake and 
crossed the highway, leading their two very small cygnets. This spectacle stopped 
a large number of cars, and people were out photographing the birds and their 
young and otherwise molesting them. This situation was cleared up as soon as 
possible, and the adult swan proceeded across the "wan Lake flats to the East, 
through the sagebrush and .grass, apparently heading for one of the small lakes 
behind Bunsen Peak. The cygnets were extremely snail and haying great difficulty 
negotiating the terrain. ir hen last observed the adults were still traveling in 
a set direction and, although the youn ; birds were not visible, it is assumed 
they were staying close to the admits. 

Mr. Kenneth Armitage, former Park Hanger ftaturaliet, is conducting a 
research study on the social behavior in marmot colonies. On July 18 the pro- 
cedure m&s set in motion^he establishment of a Collaboratorehip appointment 
for Mr. Armitage. 

On July 20 on a trip to the top of Mount Washburn, Chief Park Naturalist 
Condon observed 7 bighorn ewes and 2 Imbs. Photographs were obtained of these 
animals. Pictures were also made of 23 different alpine plants and some shots 
were obtained of tlmbcrline trees. 

On July 22 Condon worked up a draft of a proposed research project to 
be conducted, in the thermal areas. At the month's close the draft had been 
reviewed b- the interested parties and is In the procesf of being redone. 

On July 25 Park Naturalists Condon and Replogle visited the buffalo 
Jump near Emigrant. They made photographs of the rock pile and buffalo jump 
and collected some Indian artifacts. They also visited the Indian wickiups on 
Wigwam Creek and made photographs of these. At 'ladison Museum on this same day 
a large band of elk were in the meadows. One bull <a& in front of the }-fuseum 
completely surrounded by people. A number of photographs, good Kcdaslides, and 
movies were taken of the people enjoying Yellowstone wildlife. 

On July 28 a rather interesting wildlife drama was presented to a 
large number of people at Artist Point. A young pine marten had climbed one 
©f the TfagjktoHim sprues and was putting on a very interesting series of antics 
for a large number of park visitors. A lot of "odaehrome fi&a w a s exposed of 
this animal and a large number of photoflash bulbs were used. This marten was 
under observation for more than an hour.. 

On July 28 Condon made observations of grizzly bear at the Trout Creek 
tap. Ife saw 18 animals - 1 female with 2 cubs, 1 female with 3 cubs, the other 
LI bear were mature animals of varying ages. One of these 'was a runt and appeared 
to be mature so far as age is concerned, but simply was very small in size. It 
aroved to be a very interesting character and carried on antics which were highly 
uausing. 

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Dr. Brling Corf and his field party from Princeton University are 
continuing their studies of the Fossil Forest of lollowstone and are operating 
out of Roosevelt Lodge. 

Library 

Small field libraries were sent out to Jfcdison Junction and West 
Entrance In? onaation Station early in July. 

:. Frank V/agnor continued to serve as the Librarian. 

;\ny new books vere purchased by the Yellowstone Library and Museua 
Association for addition to the Library during the month. These additions are 
shown in the following listing of Library use: 

Books received 10 

Magazines received 29 

RaiBphlets received £L 

Books in circulation 107 

Books on indefinite loan 216 

A considerable supply of library materials -was purchased by the Asso- 
ciation, These included library accession cards in addition to other supplies. 

Natural History Assocla-frion, 

Mrs. Alice luist was employed as clerk of the Association and worked 
105 hours during the month. Mrs. Lucille Wagner was employed l^ the Association 
to function as the park Librarian and worked 208 hours during the month. 

3ark Katuralist Ferkenham delivered books to the field stations and 
picked up the oash on July 12. This money was taken to the National Park Bank 
on July 14. 

Paper was ordered for making a ivTrint of Fur Traders and Trapp ers. 
It is planned that 3 f 000 copies of this publication will be multilithed "a^ the 
Association. 

Several of the sales stock items had to be reordered since sales on 
these publications are above those of last year. It appears that the Association 
will run out of I'ur Traders and Traoiaera and The Story of Han in Yellowstone before 
the end of the season. Tt has been necessary to re-stock Cubby in V T onderland . the 
Wapiti and I loose pamphlets, and the pamphlet on Bison. 

A large number of mail requests for publications were filled b the 
Association. 

Park Naturalist Beal delivered sales stock books to the field on two 
occasions and Chief Bark Katuralist Condon on SSS, 

On July 1 the Association sent the following Ixaa motion pictures to 
the Color Reproduction Company for duplication! 






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1. Birds of Yellowstone 

2. Your Yellowstone 

These were returned with 4 prints of "Birds" and $ printc of Tour 
Yellowstone" on July 19. On July 7 the ltiom movie "Geyeerland in Wint»r R was 
sent In for duplication, and this was returned wit'- 4 eopies on July 28. "he 
Association spent £2,351.94 for this work. Tb* movies are being added to the 
series in use as part of the evenin- programs. One cops'- of tht picture 'Tour 
Yellowstone" was obtained for Mr. Jack B, Haynes and the Association will be 
reimbursed for the cost of this print. The Interpretive Division will have 4 
prints of each of these pictures available, and through the cooperation of the 
Hatural llistory Association it is now possible to have a different l&ma colored 
movie for 6 nights of the week. 

The Mareh-kpril issue of Yellowstone Nature Noteg was multilithed by 
Chief Bark Naturalist Condon on July 2. Scat of these were assembled the same 
day, and they were placed in the mail on July 8. The May-June issue of Yellow- 
stone Nature Mo tes was prepared, multilithed, and placed in the mail by July 27. 

Equipment and Supplies 

All property in seasonal quartan occupied by Division personnel was 
checked to the occupants of the quarters and signed for by them. This work was 
done by Park i&turaliet Deal. 

Mr. 3eal also supplied all field stations with supplies, equipment, 
and materials on a number of occasions so that normal operations could proceed 
satisfactorily. 

A large Pako photo-print dryer was received, from surplus property of 
the Bureau of Reclaiiaation. This was damaged in transit and parts for it have 
been ordered. In addition to the print dryer, a large Bell and Howell tri-pcd 
was obtained. 

The public addre&s unit at the Old Faithful geyser cone was mat of 
order from July 22 - 24. Fine cooperation was received from the Electrical 
Division in obtaining parts for the unit. It was repaired nnd back in operation 
on July 25. 

Photographic an d Visual Aide 



A new screen was put up at Fishing Bridge by Park Naturalist TTerkenham 
personnel at Fishing Bridge on July 16, 

The black and white negatives and kodaslides which were used by the 
Branch in Washington for the West Entrance Information Station were re- 
and placed in the files. 

The kodaslides and other negatives sent to the Washington office for 
ssion 6o were returned. 

A large set of I x 10 glossy prints were pnpared and sent to Washington 
iff ice for use in Assistant Secretary Lewis 1 book. 



















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A set of topical Tallow* scenes -..-ere sent to tl olidated 

Bool: hftLiShlng Company, Chicago, Illinois, for use In illustrating an encyclo- 
pedia re publishing. 

About 300 kodaslides vera aided to Yellowst one's master file. Most of 
these ore wild fla/er pict:u*es. A l*rg* order for duplicates of Yellowstone 
materials for &dditicn to the field sets was placed with Meston's by the Yellow- 
stone Library and !fuseura Association. 

oralist • tnhaa made copie-- of historical photo«*raphe for 
use in the ':odaslide collection. 

ft Naturalist 3eal obtained photo^T- of the rerraine of the Old 

Faithful Tourist Cabin office fire, and also of the elide damage done on the 
Gardiner road July 24. 

A great deal of time was devoted by Park Naturr teal to the placing 

of sound tracks on the 16am movies "Geyserland in "inter" and "Birds of Yellow- 
stone." This was completed ani the films issued to the field by the month's 
close. Chief Park Naturalist C and en devotsd a great deal c\ time to a sound 
track to be placed on the film "Your Yellov- ' , " This effort did not prove to 
be successful, and in- .1 sound traeka wil laced *Ilm early in 

August. Park Naturalist 3eal labeled all of the l&am movies and put statistical 
information cards in each of the film can lids. 

During the month 64 - 4 x 5 black and white pictures were processed, 
800 feet of 16mm motion picture film was expc id 12 roils of 35mm, 36 

exposure Kodachrome film vere ervposed. 

The 16am motion picture projector at Fishing Bridge was used for a 
special program on the even big of July 27 at Lake Lodge Recreation foil. 






jctfully submitted, 



David de L. Condon 

ark Naturalist 



Rental 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Bark September 12, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist 
Monthly Report for August 1955 

Special Activities and Conferences 

Mr. Jack E. Haynes presented all cf the seasonal naturalists cne per- 
manent naturalists with autographed copies of the 1955 Haynes Guidebook . These 
books were distributed to the men in the field on August IP. and 13. 

Mr. A. C. Shelter. , advertising representative of the Ansco Corporation, 
was in the Chief Park Naturalist's office on August 19 and discussed the various 
values of the films offered by the Ansco Corporation. , elton was very 
helpful in providing information on the value of colored films as visual aids. 

On August 21 Park Naturalist beal investigated an accident which occurred 
on the approach steps to the Madison Ifttseua. This accident involved Mrs. Mary 
A. C. Brown, 76 years of age, who fell an the steps and broke her hip. '-fr. Beal 
gathered information concerning the accident front >trs. Brown at the oth 
>ital. 

The Work Load Analysis reports for the period August 7-20 were prepared 
for Park Naturalists Herkenham, Beal, and Condon and submitted on August 21. 

tz GilstrjLp, feature writer for the Christian Science Monitor* 
was in the Chief Par- Naturalist's office on August I and 23. 
considerable information in reply to an intervic e made enmittments 
were made to make available to bin certain pictures from our Natic erviee 
files. 

On August 23 Hiss Elisabeth Cushtaan -.aid a companion from Vassar College 
conferred with the Chief Park Naturalist concerning a student-aid idet 
been developed b. Hiss Cushman with respect to providing help to the National 
Park Service in fulfilling its obligation in protecting and interpreting the 
parks. 

On August 24, the Chief Park Naturalist spent considerable time in 
conference with Wallace Hennessy, who has served for a number of years as a 
Park P.anger Naturalist. Mr. Ifermessy is seri considering starting a field 
camp for young people interested in natural science and hopes to bring students 
into Yellowstone in 1956 for the purpose of exploring the area and learning 
about natural history. r. Ifennessy was given assurances that the personnel 
in Yellowstone would give him as much assistance and cooperation as possible, 
consistent with the performance of other work responsibilities. 

On August 26 Dr. P. Pirlot, I. R. S. A. C, a biologist in the employ 
of the Belgian government at Bukavu, Belgian Congo, was in the C irk 
Naturalist's office and discussed with I Jr. Condon the wildlife in Yellowstone, 
especially the large mammals. Dr. Pirlot war to the Trout Creek dump on 



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on August 31 for the purpose of observing grizzly bear. He was also -iven 
guidance so that he was able to see bison, moose, elk, bighorn sheep, antelope, 
and Rooky Mountain mule deer. 

Br. Ray J. Davis, head of the Botany Apartment at Idaho State Col 
and forme - Ranger Naturalist in Yellow* tone, visited at eadquarters 
Museum on August 25 and 26. Dr. Alan Beetle, grass specialist f 
of Wyoming, was in the park on August 30. 

John E, Doerr, Chief Naturalist of t tional ,3rvice, Washing- 
ton, D. C., arrived at West Yellowstone at ,.m. on August ' . as met 
by Chief turalist Condon and on that day inspected the West oe 
Information Station and went over personnel matters with Mr. Condon at 
Headquarters Museum in Mammoth. On August ' Mr. Doerr was taken to It , 
Buck, Shrimp, and Grebe Lakes foa ose of familiarising himself with 
these areas. Assistant Chief Ranger Harold Edwards was on this trip. On 
August 31 Mr. Doerr was taken on an inspection of the Tower "all-Canyon area 
and visited the Trout Creek dump that evening. 

Religious Services and Chanel Use 



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The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used duri 
August for the regular religious services which were set up in the 
the 1955 summer season. Protestant, Roman Catholic, audi Latter ts 
services were held here. The Roman Catholic faith held a special service on 
August 15. 

In-Service Training 

I'inona Moore was given a review of the manner in which the multil 
Model 4£> operates on August 1, 

The Yellowstone Meekly Hews was mimeographed and distributee. 
Biterpretive Division. 

Personnel 

lurk Naturalist Ilerkenham was on duty all month, Park N&turalii 
was on duty all month, Clerk-Stenographer lioore was on duty all month, and 
C ief Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all isonth. 

Park Naturalist Heal and Naturalist Herkenham completed the per- 
formance ratings on several of the seasonal Park Ranger Natural 
Park Naturalist Condon completed the performance rating on Clerk-Stenographer 
Moore. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon was approached from the Regional office 
by letter with a proposal that he transfer to the Regional Maturalist job in 
Cteaha. This letter was received on 28, and a letter advising that {p. 
Condon is not interested was sent to t e Regional office on August 31. 

Many of the personnel on the seasonal staff terminated their services 
b- going into a furlough status during the m . Personnel who went on a 






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furlough status are listed, as well as the date on which their services ended; 



George A. Gardner 8/10/55 

Donald W. Larson S/u/55 

Walter P. iferriman 23/55 

Thad W. Stevens 8/24/55 

Simon Simonian 3/24/55 

■ne F. Replogle 8/25/5 5 

Herrold Asmussen 8/25/55 

■llace J. Hennessy 2/25/55 

Herbert T. Lystrup 8/25/55 

Alma E. Teueher 8/26/55 

Raymond T. Heekaman o/55 

Otis Robbins, Jr. S/26/55 

Burton E. Anderson 8/r 

Arthur Hash 8/2 

Donald C. Stewart S/29/55 

George . Eaha 3/3^/55 

William L. Baiter 2/55 

.liamA. Tiseher 

George M, Sverdrup V55 

Mr. Burton E. Anderson was converted from a Laborer (Jan. lositic 
to that of a seasonal Park Ranger Naturalist or?. August 

;rk Ranger Naturalists Daker , Seclcaman, Anderson, Jhn 
were converted to Career-Conditional appointments on or about August 1 , 

Interpretive Services 

The Interpretive Program, as scheduled for the 1955 season, was 
conducted in full through mid-August, and with but minor curtailments carried 
out through the entire month. There were the regularly scheduled walks, ta' 
hikes, and other activities. 

Some statistical information on personal services during August is 
listed as follows: 

---.-.-•Attendance - 

Station Camnf ire Talks Guided Trios Field Service 

Mammoth 4,155 11,306 

Harris 9,587 11,990 

Tower Fall ,799 171 13, 

Fishing Bridge 19,550 1,275 ,470 

Old Faithful 50,190 21,150 256,200 

Canyon 10,850 ,155 103,135 

Mt Thumb 4,525 6,748 

Madison 1,347 123 

Park Naturalist Beal audited programr as follows J 


















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West Thumb - August 4 
Mammoth - August 11 
Mammoth - August 13 
Tower Fall - August 14 

Park Naturalist Herkenham audited prograi»as follows J 

Lake - August 13 

Fishing Bridge - August 13 

W«»t Thumb - August 16 

Canyon - August 18 

Old Faithful - August 23 

Old Faithful - August 24 

West Thumb - August 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon audited programs as follows: 

Fishing Bridge - 

Old Faithful - August 

Fishing Bridge - August 17 

Park Naturalist Herkenham presented the movie "Geyserlarc. . Inter" 
to the West Yellowstone Lions Club on August 9. There were 25 persons in atten- 
dance. 

Park Naturalist Beal presented the following programs durin ;; the 
month: 



• 



August 7 - "Geyserland in Winter" Old Faithful, 2,000 present 
August S m "Geyserland in .'inter 1 ' Fishing Bridge, 350 present 
August 15 - "His Majesty the Buffalo" Tower Fall, 85 present 
August 22 - "Geyserland in Winter" Canyon, 200 present 
August 24 - "Geyserland in Winter" West Yellowstone L.D.8. 
church group, 75 present 

Condon gave a talk at Canyon on August 16, "lour Yellowstone", 250 
persons present* 

On the evening of August 2*7 Chief Park naturalist Condon presented a 
special program to the group of Congressional representatives who were inspecting 
Yellowstone. This program was presented in the lounge of the el and 
the motion picture "Your Yellowstone" was used. There vrere 38 persons present. 

On August 8 Chief Park Naturalist Condon and Dr. Srling Dorf conducted 
a group of 22 Girl Scout geologists to the Fossil Forest area on the lower end 
of Specimen Ridge. The group was given information at this time on the geol 
and geography of Yellowstone, and also information with respect to its other 
natural resources. 

The Tower Fall program was finished on t e evening of August 29, and 
Roosevelt Lodge closed on August 30. 



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oub Activities and Exhibits 

All of the museuos were open to the public * ring the month of August 
and proved to be popular centers for the concentration of" park visitors. 
attendance figures at the Museums vere as folic* 

Station sum Attendance Museum 'dalles 

Mammoth 34,524 2,498 

Norris 68,650 10,098 

Fishing Bridge 24,978 425 

Old Faithful 140,500 

Madison 28,445 3,749 

In addition to the five museums, the " ayside Exhibits were also 
available for use by park visitors. The exhibit at Art -int proved to 
be very popular. The attendance at the Wayside Exhibits was as follows J 

Wayside Exhibit Attendance 

Moose Exhibit 159,761 

Obsidian Cliff ,907 

Firehole Canyon 90,676 

Artist Point 263,391 

Park Naturalist Seal worked on the repair of the relief map at west 
Entrance Information Station on August 10 and 17, and on the latter date complete 
the work necessary to place this map in first class condition. 

During the month personnel at Old Faithful Museum thoroughly cleaned 
the relief map and the map of the Upper Geyser asin, and treated the maps with 
a transparent plastic spray. 

At the Headquarters Museum, Janitor Ted Davis finished painting the 
walls of the work shop during the m; nth of August. 

On August 15 Park Naturalist Replogle turned in for accessioning a 
large collection of Indian artifacts which he had found during the past season. 

t of this material was found in the vicinity of the old Sternitz Ranc. , 
between Heese and Stevens Creeks, and in the "ellroaring-Cottonwood area. 

Due to the release of seasonal personnel, it was necessary to cut down 
on the r *useura hours toward the end of the month at Fishing Bridge, Madison, 
Norris, and Mammoth. 

Research and Observation 

During the month Park Naturalists r -eal and Herkenham spent some tine 
reviewing the manuscript prepared by Park Naturalist Replogle on the Bannock 
Indian Trail. 

On August 14 Park Naturalist " eal and Chief Ranger Otto Brown and his 






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son, Dennis, descended to the Devil's Kitchen by ropes to make observations of 
the bats living there and to attempt to catch some for museum spec . The 
air in the cave was tested by lighting a flam© and found to be good in all but 
one section of the cave. On the wall of the cave just above the area where the 
gas was found, there were two little brown bats f lfcrotls lucifugus ; re 
dead, and apparently had been overcome by suffocation. These were the only 
:t, r oti3 found in the cave. However, there were 35 or 4-0 i/estera big-eared bats 
( Corynorhinus rafinesouii ) In a fissure at the east end of the cave. The party 
was unable to reach these bats safety and so did rot collect any for specimens. 

On August 19 and 20 Park Naturalist Deal made a trip to Shoshone 
Geyser Basin for the purpose of taking pictures of the hydrothermal features 
in that area. During hir stay in the geyser basin area, he witnessed eruption 
of a number of geysers. Union Geyser, MInutaraan Geyser, Gourd Geyser, Shield 
Geyser, and a small un~named geyser near the crossing of Shoshone Creek to the 
patrol cabin, all erupted. On the return trip from Shoshone Lake two fine bull 
moose were observed at the mouth of DeLacy Creek. 

Minerva Spring on Ilinerva Terrace dried up oi t 1 and did not 
begin to flow a good volume of water until August U. It was active during the 
balance of the month. 

Dr. Helmut Euchner was in the office on August 4. He spent about 
three days on 2ft. Washburn observing bighorn sheep. He submitted a preliminary 
report on his observations and while there saw 17 sheep - 2 rams, 9 ewes, and 
6 lambs* 

On August U Dr. Carl S. Gilbert of the Wyoming Agricultural Experimental 
Station brought in several specimens of clover which were collected by him during 
July. 

Dr. Ake Kullkrantz f Professor of Anthropology and History of Religion 
frcm Stockholm, Sweeden, used the Yellowstone rational Park Research Library on 
August 4> and 5 to obtain information on the Shoepeater Indians. Dr. hullkrantz 
is preparing a detailed monograph on this particular Indian group. 

huring the month Chief Park Haturalist Gondcn collected a large m, 
of insects which are being sent to the American Museum of Hatural History. Dr. 
Fred Hartig is to prepare them for addition to the Yellowstono ? rk coHection. 

Dr. ?'ierce of the U. S. Geological Survey, who has bee studying the 
area north and east of Cooke, Montana, and who did extensive work in the north- 
east section of Yellowstone two years ago, was in that section of the park on 
August 10. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon spent some time on the evening of August 10 
at tie Trout Creek dump and observed 36 different grizzly. bear. There were 33 
of these animals in sight at one time. were made on the animals seen, 
their age and sex classifications were as follows I 

1 female with 2 very light cube 

1 female with 2 light cube, with black legs and faces 

1 female with 3 very dark cubs 






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1 female with 3 dark cubs 

1 female with 3 2-year old cube 

1 female with 2 yearlings 

1 runt grissly bear which appeared mature, but very small 

3 3-year olds 

U 4-year olds - 1 very light, 1 light, I dark 

6 mature bear which appeared to be females - 3 very light, 

2 medium in color, and 1 very dark 
1 large medium-colored male 
1 very large dark-colored male 

Collecting permits were issued as follows: 

Allan A. Beetle, University of Wyoming, to collect flowe 

plants, especially grasses. 
Dr. Helmut K. Buecbner, State College of Washington, to collect 

plants. 
Maurice A. Machris, Los Angeles County Museum, to collect 

Aquatic hemiptera (water insects}. 
Dr. Gerald Seherba, University ef Chicago, to collect ants. 
Merrill D. Seal, Yellowstone National Park, to collect mammals, 

fishes, amphibians, and reptiles. 
:rman B, Herkenham, lellowstone national Park, to collect 

mammals, fishes, amphibi nd reptii 
Dr. Charles P. Alexander, University of Massachusetts, to 

collect insects. 
Kenneth M, Fender, University of Massachusetts, to collect 

insects. 

Djr, Frling Dorf and his party of geologists frois Princetc versity 
spent the period of August 10-12 in the Gallatin Fossil Forest section of Yellow- 
stone, ry were packed into a camp site on Cache Creek on August 14- and packed 
out on August 19. Dr. Porf reported excellent success in his collecting of 
fossil materials and that the past season has been an exceedingly productive one 
from the standpo:lnt of collect ta and material. life also stated on August 24. 
that he had received a '15,000,00 grant from a research foundation for the con- 
tinuation of the study. 

Dr. F. Begemann of the University of Chicago Institute of Nuclear 
Studies was in the Chief Park Naturalists office on August 16. He discussed 
with Mr. Condon the radioactive isotopes of hydrogen and indicated the desire 
of the Institute of nuclear Studies to obtain additional water samples fir 
Yellowstone for tracing the tritium content. It was pointed out that eight 
5-gallon cans of water should be obtained from the same places the samples were 
obtained last year so that the studies can be continued. T is water will be 
sent to the University of Chicago In September. 

On August 26 Mr. David Yolton, an employee of the Yellowstone Park 
Company, together with several other of t'e'r employees, visited the Grasshopper 
Glacier cmd dug several grasshopper specimens from the ice. These epecin> 
were placed in his pocket and en their return to Mammoth one of the grasshoppers 
proved to be alive, T is was astounding to the group and the living specimen, 
along with the dead ones, were brought to t! 'quarters luseum where they 






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were examined and motion pictv; of the moving grasshopper. It is thought 
that these grasshoppers vere only recently frozen- in surface ice instead of hai 
been impacted in the ice rasas for any length of time. However, it was interesting 
to learn that they would hecorae active again after having been frozen in solid 

.3. 

On August 31 a trip to the Canyon- Trout Creek area was rewarded with 
observat" if a nunber of interesting animal etween Mammoth and Canyon, 
travelling via Tower Fall, a total of 31 blae ear were seen along the roadside. 
Six moose were observed, two near Tower Junction, two on Antelope Creek, and two 
on the Yellowstone River near the mouth of Cr*ek. The grizzly bear at Trout 
Creek had dropped off in number, and only L4 of these animals were seen in the 
entire area. 

Library 

Field libraries were returned from Canyon, H orris, Madison Junction, 
and Tower Fall. These books were returned to the stacks. other field 
libraries will be brought in in September. 

Through the courtesy of Jae . - . Haynes, a copy of the 1929 I&vneg 
Guidebook was obtained. This now completes the set of Guidebooks from the 
time they were first published up to date. 

Mrs. Lucile Wagner served as Librarian until August 18. 

The following list reflects the use of the Library during the 
month of August: 

Books received 3 

Magazines received 27 

PaaphletB received 35 

Books in circulation 103 
Books on indefinite loan 

Natural History Association 

On August 4- the May-Juno issue of Yello w stone Nature Notes was com- 
pleted and placed in the mail. There were lX& copies sent out. 

Early in the month Rtr buralist Herkenham, the Association clerk 
Alice Quiet, and other members of the Interpretive staff at Mammoth worked on 
multilithing and assembling Fur Traders and Trappers of the Old West . There 
were 3,1?5 copies completed. 

During the month the Association purchased two new Portapage portable 
public address units, and one more is on order. 

•s. Lucile Wagner was employed b„ the association as Librarian, 
terminated her services at the close of busine ust 17 and left the park 
August IS. Her oersonal gear was taken to West Yellowstone on that day. Hr. 
Wagner had been hospitalized in the Mammot vital since July 20 and his hea" 
was such that Mrs. Wagner had to return to their home in Salt Lake City. 



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The Association employed Wilson Condon to work in the darkroom 
making enlargements and contact prints. During hla employment he made 160 
8 x 10 enlargements and 100 A x 5 contact . The association paid him 
37.50 for this work. 

aturalist Herkenham delivered book sales stock and picked up 
sales receipts on August 2, 16, end 30. 

On August 21 Chief ' uraliet Condon talked to Mrs. Kerna Baggley, 
who happened to be in West Yellowstone, about .anuscript for the book, Planets 
of Yellowstone « whleh iB being prepared by 'gley and Br. W. B. UacDougall. 

During the Month the Eastman Kodak Company completed their investi- 
gation of the damaged coiy of the 16mm movi fserlaad" and indicated a 
willingness to replace this f:V . On August 27 Chief Park 

Naturalist Condon completed editing and reviewing the original film on thii 
ie, and it was sent to Eastman for duplication. 

."quinment and Supplies 

On August 9 t eal and Janitor Ted. Davis thoroughly 

cleaned the Red Storehouse and Laboratory , ^arranged the equipment and 
supplies which are stored in these two places. 

During the month new ropes were placed on the screens at Mammoth 
and Canyon. 

Microscopes were loaned during the month to Forester Barrows and 
Mr. Bernard P.. McClelland for their use in ; studies of ,ruce budvona, 
and these two pieces of equipment were returned by the month's close. 

The screen car. from ig Bridge was enlarged to accommodate si 14- 
foot screen. 

mother Model 202C Bell and Howell ] totion picture projector - 
received on August 9. The magnetic sound on aaehine does not work satis~ 
factorily, and negotiations are underway with the Ball and Howell Company 
rectify this. 

.* Ioosji motion picture projector, kodaslide projector, and a 
3% x 4 lantern slide projector vara loaned to Dr. Lueck for use at the American 
•eone meeting held at Canyon Hotel Augur; 

An excellent piece of equipment Ided to the darkroom when a lar 
size n ako "Tint Dryer MM installed. Thii equipment is valued at f 500.00 and was 
obtained from surplus. The fine cooperation of the teal Division made it 
possible to put this equipment into operate . 7 lectrician Foreman Larry Murray 
and Bruce McMullin worked some eor,tribu _ i the installation and 

their help is greatly appreciat . 

Photo-mrcphic and Visual Aids 

""'ark Naturalists Bea 1 several hours making a detailed 









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photographic record in color and black and whit* of the trance Information 
Station and the interior exhibits on August 25. 

" ork accomplished in the darkroom consisted of the following: 

21$ - S xllO enlargements 
184 «* k X 5 contact prints 
Ci -ix 5 negatives processed 
2 - V-122 rolls pro**! .ed 

1 - 616 roll processed 

2 * 35am black and white rolls processed 

Six hundred feet of l&ma kodachrome movie film were exposed and 8 
rolls of K-135 35mm kodachrome film. 

Park Naturalist Seal put the sound track on U copies of the l(xam 
colored motion picture entitled "Geyserland in Winter," .turalist Condon 
put the sound track on 4- conies of the 16mm motion picture "lour Yellowstone," 

Film was processed for the C: ief i .anger's office and prints made of 
a stolen automobile and the drowning scene at the Yellowstone River b: aear 
Tower Junction, 

Three 100-foot cables for use with the sound system of the 16mm Bell 
and Howell projectors were assembled for the xaiist Division at the Electric 
Shop on August 10. 

Special pictures were taken of the Jeep fire truck on August 26. 

A complete list of tiie scene sequence for the movie 'Your Yellows- 
was made. This consists of 430 different scenes. Copies of the scene sequence 
for this movie and the movie "Geyserland in Winter" were typed and placed with 
each of the reels of film. 

An attempt was made to work up a synchronized sound tape for t 
purpose of dubbing in natural sounds with the projected scenes. In all about 
30 hours of effort was put into this before it was discovered that the technique 
being used was not successful. 

There were 68 new subjects added to the 8 field sets of kodaslides. 
Park Naturalist Herkenham spent considerable time numbering, classifying, and 
arranging for their binding. 

Twenty original kodaslides were sent to the Blueridge Parkway for their 
use. These slides were excess to the needs of Yellowstone. 

A set of 12 slides of the large raamnals of Yellowstone were sent to 
t e C ief of Information for duplication. 

Several 8 x 10 black and white glossy prints were sent to the follow' 

Br, H. Cleyndert, Amsterdam, Holland 

Scott, Foresman end Company, Publishers , Chicago, 111 

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Corning Glass Company 

director's office in on, D. C. 

These glossy prints were to be used for the ourpose of illustra; 
material on Yellowstone. 

jspectfully suteit: 



David de L, Condon 
Chief 1st 



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Superintendent October 12, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist, Yellowstone National Park 
Monthly report for September 1955 
Special Activities and. Conferences 



Park Naturalist Herkenham travelled to Billings, Montana, on September 3» 
On the moflrjtng of September h he met members of the National Parks Advisory Board 
and Herbert Kahier, Chief Historian, and brought them to Yellowstone via the Bear- 
tooth Highway, 

Mr, William Brown of the Smithsonian Institution was in the Headquarters 
Museum and obtained pictures from us of the northern Yellowstone landscape in winter. 
These pictures will be used in preparing the background of an exhibit of elk which 
were taken from Yellowstone many years ago, and which are to be part of the revised 
Large mammal exhibits at the Smithsonian Institution, Mr, Brown also arranged 
with the Chief Ranger's office for a grizzly bear which will be used in these 
(xhibits . 

Mr, and Mrs. Frank Hibben were in the Chief Park Naturalist's office 
:>n September 19. Mr. Hibben is an emminent wildlife lecturer and author and is 
. professor of archeology at the University of New Mexico. 

John E. Roerr, Chief Naturalist, was in Yellowstone from the first of 
eptember to the sixth. On September 6 he was taken to Teton National Park by 
'ark Naturalist Beal. Vhile Mr, Roerr was in Yellowstone, conferences were held 
ji the Chief Park Naturalist's office on September 2 and R, with Chief Ranger 
Jrown, Assistant Chief Ranger Edwards, and Biologist Kittams participating in the 
liscussions on the northern elk problem and fisheries matters. 

On September 5 Chief Park Naturalist Condon took Dr. Brew, Dr. Bannister, 
[rs. Kettie Benson, and Herbert Kahier on a field trip into the park. This I 
isited the top of Mount Washburn, the Grand Canyon area, and Hayden Valley, going 
^ far as Mary Lake and return. 

There were several visitors in the Chief Park Naturalist's office who 
fhould be mentioned. They were: 

September 2 - George Fahnstock, former District Forest Ranger in 
Gardiner. 

September 7 - William Garst, Walt Risney wildlife photographer. 

September 26 - The Rev. Ronald Redfield of the Pine Creek Methodist 
Church, 

September 13 - Edward T. Bartlett, representative of the Eastman 
Kodak Company. 

September 23 - Mrs, W, C, Hammond, e free lance writer from Berkeley, 
California, Park Naturalists Beal, Herkenham, and 
Condon spent considerable time with her answering 
innumerable questions.. She made many notes and 









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examined the photographic files for the purpose of 
requesting negatives to illustrate anything she may- 
write. 

On September 15 Bruce Vvatson, a son of former lark Naturalist Y . Verde 
nfatson, stopped in at the Chief Fark Naturalist's office with his bride. Bruce 
was married September 12 at Belle Fourche, South Dakota, and was honeymooning in 
Yellowstone. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon gave over several days time to Mission 66 
work. Several hours were spent in conference on September 8, Ik, 23, and 28. 
4rs. Mcore t;ped rough drafts of material and finished copies on this subject. 

' Bring the month Park Naturalist Beal closed the seasonal quarters 
jf all Fark Ranger Naturalists and made inventories in most of them. 

-teligious Services and Chapel Use 



The regular Student Ministry Program continued through the month of 
September with Protestant services being held in the Yellowstone National Fark 
)hapel at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday. The Latter Day Saints i man Catholic 
lervices terminated on September U. 

The regular winter Sunday School service for the residents of the 
:ommunity of Mammoth began on Sunday, September 25. 

A congregational meeting was held on Sunday, September 25, following 
ihe regular Church service. At that time the members of the congregation or. 
ted for the continuation of a winter ministry program in Yellowstone with the 
lev. Puajne Murphy to serve as the minister for the communities of Gardiner and 
lammoth. The congregation elected the following persons to represent the cora- 
I wnity of Mammoth on a joint committee with representatives from Gardiner J 

Huntley Child 

. Mary Armstrong 
Iter Kittams 
Mrs. Hildur Mattson 



These four people, working with a comparable number from Gardiner, will 
lake up the committee which will handle the winter religious services program. 






On September 25 the Rev. Edward A. Syms of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church 
n Livingston baptized the Trev Povah children in the Yellowstone National Park 
hap el. 

On the evening of September 8 the Yellowstone Committee of the National 
ouncil of Churches, sponsors of the Student Ministry in the National Parks, met 
or the purpose of terminating the business of this committee for the 1955 season 
to elect new members to the committee. This meeting: was held in the Conference 
om and the Rev. Messrs. Ortmeyer and \ alker from Livingston were present. The 
taBnittee set up a tentative schedule for the student ministry program which will 
e conducted in Yellowstone during the 1956 season. This schedule will be incor- 
orated in the Superintendent's Church Committee program for the park. 



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On September 12 the Rev. Forest Clark of the English Lutheran Church 
in Livingston and a field representative of the Lutheran Church were in tta 
Park Naturalist's office. They discussed the summer ministry program as well as 
the winter ministry program which ie conducted in the communities of Mammoth and 
Gardiner. It was concluded that the Lutheran Church would cooperate wholeheartedly 
in both ventures and would not begin missionary services in this area. 

The Rev. Duane Murphy, who is going to be the resident minister for the 
community, was given office space in the Museum on September 21, 

r n-5ervice Training 



Fark Naturalist Herkenhsm was en duty all monthj Park Naturalist 3eal 
rfas on duty all monthj Clerk-Stenographer Moore was on duty all months and Chief 



The Yellowstone "Weekly News was mimeographed and distributed by the 
nterpretive Division. 

: ersonnel 



"ark Naturalist Condon was en duty all month except 1 daj 
September 6, 



of annual leave taken 



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Fark Naturalists Beal and Herkenham spent a great deal of tiiae during 
Aie month shifting schedules, preparing tours of duty, s.nd attending to other 
ietails associated with the closing of the program at the various field stations 
ind the release of personnel on furlough status. 

Seasonal personnel were released as follows: 

Park Ranger Naturalist Furlou^he d 

Wallace Good 9/2/55 

Robert Jonas ?/3/55 

C larence Alleman 9/5/55 

Frank Rentchler 9/5/55 

George Marler 9/7/55 

Frederick B, Turner 9/7/55 

V illiam Driscoll 9/8/55 

Herbert Moline 9/8/55 

B, Jay Rencher 
amuel M. Beal 
Joseph Catmull 
Joseph Murphy 
Lowell Biddulph 



Laborer (Janitor) 

Ted Davis 
Howard Biddulph 



9/8/5! 

9/10/55 

9/10/55 

9/10/55 

9/13/55 

Terminated 

9/5/55 
9/17/55 



Park Ranger Naturalist Charles Cebler was transferred from Yellowstone 
ational Park to a permanent appointment as Park Naturalist in the National Capital 
arks. Mr, Gebler's services terminated in Yellowstone at the close of business 
apt ember 19. 



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Inter?: retive Services 



The Interpretive program was carried in full force at all stations 
i through Labor Day, with a pronounced curtailment in activities after that date, 

field activities at Fishing Bridge, V est Thumb, Old Faithful, and 
Mammoth were audited by the permanent Park Naturalists. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon prepared a copy of program announcements in 
draft form. It is contemplated that these announcements will be printed and pre- 
:ared for use next season. The draft was reviewed by Park Haturalists Heal and 
ierkenham. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon held several conferences with Park Naturalists 
Jeal and Herkenham for the purpose of reviewing the summers program and assembling 
lata and information for the preparation of plans for the program for next season. 

The labels and Introductory signs for the Self -guiding Nature Trails were 
.aken down early in September. The introductory signs were brought to Mammoth for 
he purpose of painting them for next years use. 

The field Interpretive program adhered closely to the full program 
utlined for the season. It was not until after September 8 that guided field 
rips were discontinued. Da September 10 the evening talks at Fishing Brid 
nd Mammoth were terminated* The entire program was clos< 'orris, Madison, 
id Vest Thumb on September 8, Fi« aptember 12, Canyon on 

eptember U, and Mammoth on September 19. The program continued through the 
onth at Old Faithful and will cany on into October. 

The 16mm movie "Ceyserland" was on loan to the Rev. Edward A. Syms who 
sed it in Canada daring the month. It was shown as follows: 

September 8 - 175 persons, Cunton, Manitoba, Canada 
September 16 - 125 persons, Benito, Manitoba, Canada 
September 23 - 150 persons, Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada 

eum Activities and Exhibits 

Norris Museum and Madison Museum closed September 8 and Fishing Brid ; 
l|iseum closed September 12. Old Faithful and Mammoth Museums remained open during 
lie month of September. -The cut flower displays were discontinued at Mammoth 
typtember/and at Fishing Bridge September 2. 

The shutters were placed on the Norris, Madison, and Fishing Bridge 
eums at the time they were closed for the season. All equipment and supplies 
these stations were brought to the Headquarters Museum, end other properties 
re inventoried. 

. Tennis Brown, who has been collecting small animals for the Yellow- 
lone Park Collection, turned in a nice representative group of specimens on 
Iptember 12. They have been, accessioned as part of the Yellowstone study skin 
collection. 



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j Research and Observation s 



On the evening of September U4 Bruce KcMullin and Tommy Garry turned in 
a bobcat which they had found hit by a car on Swan Lake Flat. This anr'mal was 
skinned out by Park Naturalist Beal on September 15 and was sent to Lentfer Bros, 
bo see if it could be mounted or prepared as a study skin. They advised against 
ising the skin for any purpose and it was disposed of. 

Park Naturalist Beal made the following interesting observations 
lorris Geyser asin on September 8r 

1. Echinus Geyser erupted to a height of approximate!,}' 1*0 feet and 
put on a very fine display. 

2. Yellow Funnel Spring, re'inarily a quiescent pool, was completely 
drained of water and was performing as a steam vent, 

3. An unnamed feature between i'ellcw Funnel Spring and Green Dragon 
Spring was also acting as a steam vent, whereas it is usually a 
boiling, muddy pool. 

k* Fhillips Caldron was noted to be about 18 inches lower in level 
than is usually the case, 

5. Big Alcove Spring was down about 8 inches and was acting as a 
spouter or geyser throwing v^ater 12 to 15 feet high. 

6. Medusa Tiring, which is ordinarily a clear quiet pool, was down 
h feet in water level and was constantly boilinj , 

7. Coral Geyser had changed color of its pool from a beautiful blue 
to a lather off -colored green. 

8. The L'ouble Bulger was acting as a steam vent. 

9. Palpitator Spring's water level was down 9 inches. 

These changes were probably due to the rather dry weather duri >.tst 
ad early September, and the resultant lowering of the water table level in the 
arris Geyser Basin area. 

On September 9 an outline of a proposed research study to be made in 
ser basins along the Firehole River and a memorandum were sent to the 
jrector's office for the purpose of review by them and submission to the Resources 
r.j >r the Future for a research grant. On September 19 a copy of a proposed study 
! is received fro:n Mr. George . ...r-ler. On September 20 a copy of this proposed 
iudy, along with a memorandum, was sent to the Director for use with the one 
ihbmitted by Yellowstone. 

On September 16 Park Naturalists Beal and Condon visited the Terrace 
ftring area and in a small depression found 15 dead birds. They were mostly 
Hjrblers and junfcos and apparently' had met death by suffocation. These pits 



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also contained a number of dead insects, especially grasshoppers. A detailed 
report of these observations are being prepared in a special Nature Note by Park 
Naturalist Beal. 

On September 16 and 19 Chief t'ark Naturalist Condon and Park Naturalist 
^Beal collected 5-gallon water samples from, each of the following lugs: 

Minerva Spr. 

Ojo Caliente Spring 

Gibbon I iver 

Spring near Hurricane Vent - 

Norris Geyser Easin 
Vixen Geyser 
Iron Spring 
Artemisia Qeyser 
Firehole Piver 

These water samples were shipped by freight collect on September 1? 
io Pr. F. Begemann of the Institute of Nuclear Studies at the University of 
hicago. Pr. Begema.Ji is continuing an intensive study of the hydrogen isotopes 
.n water. 

On September 19 rock specimens were given tc Mr. Donald A, Harrison 
f Prince Rupert, Alberta, Canada, for exhibit in the Prince Rupert Russu . 
in this same day Mr. Tom Clifford was given a set of rock specimens for use in 
he Geology department at Leeds University in England. 

Mr. Marvin 2. Richey, Topographic Engineor for the U, S. Geological 
urvey, was in the Chief Park Naturalist's office on September 2k and 29. Cons- 
iderable time was spent going over the place names which will be used on the 
• S. G. S. topographic map of that section of Yellowstone which is north of 
he Montana-Wyom^.n" state line. 

On September 21; Mr. Reyracnri de Saussure, a speleologist from San Fran- 
is co, spent considerable time in the Clef Fark Naturalists office staid, 
nquiry concerning caves of various kinds in Yellowstone Park. He was especially 
iterested in the possibilities of caverns associated with the Hot Springs 
ace development. 

On September 30 Park Naturalists Beal and Condon spent part of the day 
Hayden Valley studying the buffalo and observing the depleted range conditions 
many sections of the Valley area. They hiked over several miles of the country 
Lde and made a number of natural history observations. Some interesting fern 
»ciraens were collected in some caves in one of the rugged cany o^secti one of the 
Lley. 

A bison and moose skull were sent on an indefinite loan basis to Lewis 
4 Clarke Normal School at Lewiston, Idaho. 



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|Library 

The following list reflects the use of the Library during the month 
Df Sep terser: 

ooka received f> 

Magazines received 13 

Pamphlets received 30 

tike in circulation 37 

Books on indefinite loan 216 

Na tural History Association 



Park laturaiist Herkenham spent considerable time on Association business 
:losing out book sales activities at Fishing Bridge, Madison, and Mammoth. 

Park Naturalist Herkenham spent several days making a detailed and 
:areful editing of the manuscript of th< oek idian Trail book by Wayne 

teplogle. It is now ready for submission to a publisher. 

Park Naturalist Beal spent three days making revision notes on the 
>ook Story of Han in Yellc^stor.e by Dr. M. D, Beal. The Association has acquired 
he bronze plates for this publication at a. cost of flOO.OO plus the freight, 
| mounting to about $U8,QQ, These plates ar stored in the Headquarters 

useum basement. 

Considerable time was spent in a discussion of the potential publications 
rogram of the Natural History Association with Park Naturalists Heal and Herkenham, 

Yellowstone Nature '3ctcs for the months of July and August were multi- 
it hed, assembled, ar2 went out in the mail on September 29. The major part of 
his work vts done by Clerk-Stenographer Mcore and Park Naturalist Beal. 

The association purchased a new power cord end switch for the Eastman 
odaslide projector. 

Turing the month the Association arranged to get the collection of 
ellovstone plants made by Ir. Conj(ard. They will be obtained from Grinnell Col 
nd placed in the Yellowstone Park Herbarium. Mrs. Herma Baggley will get these 
pecimens und send them to Yellowstone in October or November. 

tThe Association paid ? 211.65 to Mrs. Robert J. Powell for typing the 
nuscrir t copy of the Baggley-MePougal book Plants of Yellowstone which the 
sociation plans to publish this winter. 

At the close of the month the Executive wSecretar? ordered a large 
umber of books for inclusion in the Yellowstone Park Research Library. 

juipment and Supplies 



The following pickups were turned in on September 9* #12026, #12270, 
id #12271. 



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On September 1 we received 6 Bell Kid Howell speakers for use with the 
l6mm motion picture equipment. These speakers, together with the ones we already 
iave t will five us an ample supply of this type of equipment. 

On September 12 a new Royal typewriter was obtained for use by the 

Clerk-Stenographer. 

On September 23 a l6mm motion picture projector was loaned to Mr. John 
«• Nicholls. It vas returned September 26. 

On September 21 the ampli£feer unit for one of the new magnetic sound- type 
| projectors was returned to Bell and Howell because of a defect. They have agreed 
bo repair this unit at no cost. It should be returned early in October. 

Photographic and Visual Aids 



Arrangements have been made for Mr. Eld on Smith, Fish and Wildlife 
i Service, Boaeman, to obtain duplicate slides from the lellowsto! k collection, 
'hey are to be used in the wildlife educational program in Montana. 

The public address units, the Portapages, and the 35mm and 16mm pro- 
jection equipment vere brought in from the field. Most of this equipment was 
ileaned and stored for the winter by ] aturalist Beal. 

One hundred 8 x 10 bleedout enlargements were made of the West Yellow- 
tone Information Station. These prints were assembled into three folders for 
ise at the conference in the Great Smokies. 

On September 21 the movie "Mud Fots, Oeysersj and Hot Fools" was sent 
>n loan to the Rev, Keith Pcstlethwaite. 

jspectfully submitted, 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park List 

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Superintendent November 1, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist, Yellowstone National Park 
Monthly Report for October 1955. 

Special Activities and Conferences 

A great deal of time during the month of October was devoted to the 
preparation of material for Hission 66. Conferences were attended for the better 
part of the day on October 7> 25, 26, and 27 in Superintendent Rogers' office. 

On October 6 considerable time was spent with Mr« Langhofer of the 
U. S. Geological Survey on the mapping work that has been going on this summer, 
especially with respect to the details which should be included on maps made of 
the hydrothermal areas and outlining the hydro thermal areas of the park on which 
it was thought that detailed maps should be made. 

Mr. David Lillis and Mr. Paul Enten, Museum Technicians, arrive 
Yellowstone on October 8 and were taken to Old Faithful October 9 9 where they b< 
installing the new museum exhibits. Mr. Frank Buff mire, Museum Branch, arrived in 
Yellowstone October 12 and was taken to Old Faithful, where he participated in the 
exhibit installation. Mr. Buff mire left Yellowstone October 17 via West Yellovstoi 
headed for Grand Canyon. Mr. Lillis and Mr. Enten were taken by Park Naturalist 
Herkenham to catch the morning train in Livingston, Montana, on October 18. They 
returned to Washington. 

Two installations were completed in October which will be very helpful 
to park visitors. They are the Inspiration Point stairway and platform, and 
the new walks and guard rails at the Fountain Paint Pots. The Engineer! 
Division is to be commended for the fine job they did. These facilities will 
be of great help in aiding park visitors to enjoy the park. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon participated in conducting Crown Prince 
Albert of Belgium through the park October 16, He met the Crown Prince, along 
Assistant Superintendent Hamilton, at the railroad station in Livingston, Montana. 
The Crown Prince was taken through the geyser basins, around the Lake as far as 
Pumice Point, and out the South Entrance. He had an opportunity to photograph 
considerable wildlife and several geysers in eruption. 

Park Naturalist Beal participated in a court case on October 3 when a 
Mr. Hancock was brought to trial for speeding and reckless driving. 

Park Naturalist Herkenham served as the Acting Chief Park Naturalist 
for the period October 17-21. -ring this period Mr. Herkenham attended the Staff 
Conference held in the Conference Room October 20. 



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Religious Services and Chapel Use 

The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used for the regular Church 
service each Sunday at 9*30 a.m., with the Rev. Fuane Murphy conducting the 
services. Sunday School was held each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. A special Communion 
service was held in the Chapel on October 2, and Reformation Sunday Service 
was held October 30. 

On October 8 the Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used 
wedding ceremony of Miss Zella Mae Peterson and Mr. Andrew Cordon Erickson. 
The couple was married at 3»00 p.m. in an impressive ceremony. lowing the 
marriage, there was a reception in the Mammoth Canteen. 

In-Service Training 

Park Naturalist Herkenhara devoted considerable time to in-service 
training in teaching Park Ranger Naturalist Ted Parkinson darkroom procedures 
and the proper steps in binding kodaslides for the Yellowstone Park collection. 

The regular Yellowstone's Weekly New s was mimeographed, assembled, 
and distributed by the Division. 

Personnel 

Fark Naturalist Herkenham was on annual leave from October 3-lii> 
using 80 hours of annual leave. Fark Naturalist Beal was on annual leave 
October 12 and from October 2U-31* using 56 hours of annual leave. Clerk- 
Stenographer Winona Moore was on duty all month except h. hours leave without 
pay taken October 31 • Chief Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month except 
for 36 hours of annual leave taken during the period October 17-21. Park 
Ranger Naturalist Ted Parkinson was on duty all month and was moved from Cld 
Faithful Museum to the Mammoth Museum October 11. 

Interpretive Services 

The Old Faithful Museum was kept open through October 6, and cone talks 
and evening programs were presented there. These were the only general pu 
interpretive services offered during October. 

On October 17 Fark Naturalist Beal conducted a special party consisting 
of 32 High School students and their 2 advisors on a trip around the lower loop. 
This party was from Bradenton, Florida, They are attending school in Idaho Falls, 
Idaho, while a comparable group from Idaho Falls are attending school in Bradenton. 

The l6mm motion picture "Your Yellowstone" was sent tc Herrold Asraussen 
on October 19. This motion picture is to be used for programs in Sioux City, Iowa, 
and especially for a program at their Central High School. 

Chief Park Naturalist ondon presented a program on "Birds of Yellowstone" 
to the Kiwanis Club of Livingston, Montana, October km There were about 25 persons 
present. 



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Chief Fark Naturalist Condon presented a program to the joint Rotary- 
Clubs of White Sulphur Springs and Livingston in White Sulphur Spr ;ana, 
on the evening of October 26. The 16mm raovie "Your Yellowstone" was used to 
illustrate the talk on Yellowstone's resources. There were 50 persons present. 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 

The Old Faithful Museum was kept open through October 6, and the Mammoth 
Museum was open to public use throughout the month of October. 

The new exhibit panels for the Old Faithful Museum arrived in Yellowstone 
on October h and were taken to Old Faithful October 5. Another box of exhibit 
panels arrived October 9 and were taken to Old F« ,1 that same day by Cnief 
Park Naturalist Condon. The Museum Specialists Pavid Lillis, Paul Enten, and 
Frank Buffmire installed the exhibit panels in the cases and on the walls in the 
Museum and completed their work there October 18. There are a number of jobs 
bo be completed before the exhibits will be in proper order for public display, 
including the installation of some panel lighting, false tops on exhibit cases, 
and flood lights. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon was at Old Faithful helping with the exhibit 
installation on October 9, 10, and llu Fark Naturalists Beal, Herkenham, and 
Parkinson also assisted at various times with the installation of the exhibits. 
rhe electricians completed the electrical wiring on October 27, and the carpenters 
rendered fine service in the preparation of the case tops for lighting installation 
and assisted in other phases of the installation of the exhibits. The painters 
painted the insides of the exhibit cases and the walls. The best of cooperation 
was received from all divisions in making the installations at Old Fait 

All of the accessioned Museum items which had previously been on display 
at Old Faithful were returned to the Headquarters Museum at Mammoth, and there i6 
a great deal of work to be done in storing and altering the records on these 
Museum accessioned items. 

By the end of the month the shipping crates which the exhibit panels 
came in and the tools of the Museum Specialists had been shipped back to Washington, 

All of the Museum panels installed in the Old Faithful Museum were 
photographed in color and black and white before the glass was placed on the 
cases so that good pictures are now on hand for use in evening Interpretive 
programs, as well as for other purposes. These exhibits were photographed 
by Park Naturalists Beal, Herkenham, and Condon. 

All the wayside exhibits, including the Norris Museum foyer, were open 
for public use through the mtenth of October, and it is anticipated that they will 
be closed as of November 1 or immediately thereafter. 

Research and Observations 

On October 2 on the Upper Terraces at Mammoth a coyote was observed. 
He walked along the ground, stopped and listened a moment, took another step and 
listened again, and then proceeded to dif rapidly. ; er much vigorous digging 



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the coyote stuck his nose into the hole and came up with a large gopher. 

On October 21* Bonita Pool was noted to be flooding heavily, with a 
sufficient volume to flood the road from Palsy Geyser to the junction with the 
main highway. Further observation of this phenomenon indicated an alternating 
ebb and flow of water between Bonita Pool and Brilliant Pool. Paisy Geyser, 
which is located between these two features, was entirely dormant and has been 
inactive through the balance of the month of October. 

Giant Geyser erupted at about 3*30 p.m. on October 25. The interval 
of this eruption of Giant was in excess of three weeks. During this time there 
has been pronounced activity on the part of urotto Geyser, Rocket Geyser, and 
Grotto Fountain Geyser. 

On October 27 and 2fl Park Naturalists Herkenham, Parkinson, and Condon 
worked on the cleanup of rubbish from Morning Glor.y Pool and on the removal of 
rocks from Bonita Pool. Seven large rocks, weighing 50 or more pounds each, 
were removed from Bonita Fool. After a great deal of work, all large rocks and 
most small debris were removed from this particular thermal feature. It was 
possible to clean debris from Morning Glory Pool for only a short time each 
day because of the silting of the water, making it impossible to see what was 
being done. 

On October 28 specimens were collected from the outlet of Hot Kiver 
for Dr. Harmon Craig of the Institute of Nuclear Research at the University of 
Chicago. These specimens were obtained from the water's surface, 3 feet, 6 feet, 
9 feet, and 12 feet above the water from the cliff of travertine at this point. 
Pr. Craig is determining the age of the deposition of this rock. 

Park Naturalist Beal spent October h working on details with respect 
to a revision of the book, St ory of Man in Yellowstone , by his father, Pr. M. D. 
Beal. 

Library 

The field libraries from all field stations were returned to the stacks 
by Park Naturalist Beal on October 3. 

Puring the month of October a large number of books were purchased by 
the Yellowstone Library and Museum Association for inclusion on the Library stacks. 
These purchases are reflected in the following statistics of Library use: 

Books received 60 

Magazines received 29 

Pamphlets received U3 
Books in circulation 

Books on indefinite loan 85 

Natural History Association 

The September-October Nature Notes copy was ready for completion by the 
end of the month. 



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Two 16mm prints were obtained by the Association of the movies taken 
by Mr. Herb C. Golz of the mud flow at the Black Dragon's Caldron. These copies 
were made from Mr. Golz's 8mm film, and a copy of his 8mm film was sent him 
appreciation of his making the film available for our use. 

The Association sent a large number of periodicals and books to Dieter 
Book Binders to be bound. 

Equipment and Supplies 

The projection screens at all field stations were taken down and brought 
in tc Mammoth. 

On October 26 the public address equipment used for the Old Faithful 
cone talks was put in storage in the Old Faithful Museum. 

Fark Naturalist Beal completed the property inventories at all Museums 
and naturalist quarters. He was assisted by Stanley Filmore of the Storehouse. 
Upon completion of these inventories, reports were prepared and submitted to the 
Board of Survey covering shortages and damaged property. 

The apartment building at Old Faithful was closed October 18. 

P ho tographic and Visual Aids 

A large number of pictures were taken of the Old Faithful Museum exhibits. 
Three rolls of K-135 indoor kodachrome were exposed, and a large number of black 
and white pictures were taken of these subjects. In addition to these photographs, 
two rolls of kodachrome were taken of field subjects, and 100 feet of l6mm koda- 
chrome were exposed. There were 62 - h x Jj> films developed in the darkroom during 
October. 

A new plate glass was put in the contact printer in the darkroom. 

A set of 6 Yellowstone kodaslides were sent to Shiloah National Military 
Park for use in a talk on all national parks. These slides were a gift to that 
park. 

Seventy-four original kodaslides of Dr. Ray J. Davis and Herrold Asmussen 
were sent to Meston's for the purpose of obtaining duplicate prints to be added 
to the Yellowstone Park field sets. 

Respectfully submitted, 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 

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Acting Superintendent, Yellowstone December 7, 1955 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly Report for November 1955 

Special Act i vities and C onferences 

The National Perk Service Auditors spent the better part of the month 
making the internal audit of the activities of the Interpretive Division and 
especially of th«$ Yellowstone Library and Museum. Association records and activities. 
On November 3 a conference vas beld with Auditors Bellinger, Seybolt, and McQuade 
concerning the activities of the Association and the Interpretive Division* 

The Interpretive Division worked up a section on interpretation for 
inclusion in the Mission 66 submission on Big Hole Battlefield National Monument. 
After the Staff Meeting held en November 10, Chief Park Naturalist Condon thoroughly 
reviewed the Big Hole Battlefield Missi submission. On November 15 he went 
over it with Assistant Chief Ranger 1-icComas, and it was ca r. McComas 
and submitted to the Director^ ce. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended the Staff Meeting on November 10 
at which time the Auditor, Mr. Bellinger , discussed some aspects of the internal 
audit and a review was made of the Big Hole Battlefield Mission 66 submissic » 

Parr Naturalist Herkenham attended the Staff Meeting on fovember 22 at 
which time Mr. Bellinger reviewed the recommendations re being made by the 
Internal Audit Committee* 

During the early part of the month Blmer Armstrong and his crew com- 
pleted the installation of wooden walks on f Ffill. They ale- installed same 
wooden walks in biscuit Basin. T! is enr-j hi d b job, and the 
installation of the walks is going to be a marked contribution to the protection 
of the thermal areas and the control of public use. They wil materially 
aid people in getting to vantage points from which they can best see the thermal 
features. 

Religious Services and Chapel Use 

The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used each Sunday for regular 
Protestant services. The Rev. Duane Murphy held an interdenominational service 
in the Chapel at 9*30 a.m. on November 6 and 13. On November 20 the time of the 
service was changed to 10:00 a.-n., and it will be conducted at this time 
during the balance of the winter. 

The regular Yellowstone Park Sunday School services were held in the 
Chapel each Sunday morning at 11: JO a. . 



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In-Service Training 

Park Naturalist Herkenham devoted considerable time during the month 
of November to training Park Ranger Naturalist Ted Parkinson in dark room 
techniques so that he could proceed with the work necessary to bring the 
photofra hie files up to date. 

The Interpretive Tivision continued to mimeograph and distribute the 
Yellowstone Ve eV ly Ne w s • 

Personnel 

II l List Herkenhan was on duty all month and served as Acting 

Chief Park laturalist for the period November 16 - 27. Park . ist Beal 
was on annual leave the first part- of the month and returned to duty the morning 
of November Ik and was on duty the balance of the month* Clerk-Stenographer 
tfoore was on duty all month. r ralict on was on duty 

all month except ; hours of annual 1 > ; fovember 10. ] 'aturailst 
Condon was or duty ell month except for the period November 16 - 2? when he was 
in an annual leave star 

Turing the month letter!? were written to the five C 3-5 Park Naturalists 
advising them of the Civil Service Examination which is to be gi .camber 12. 

Interpretive Se-nr' cee 

There were no general interpretive activities offered to the public 
during the month of November, but several special activities ware rendered by 
the Division. 

On ber 7 the l6nua motion picture r " : :>ts, and Hot 

Pools" was sent to Ricks College where it was usee on November 10 as a special 
program for the Ricke College Leadership Week. 

On November 9 Chief ft aturalist Condon conducted the Rev, Dr. 

mill— Alexander, his wife, and their pilot on a special trip to Old Faithful 
and return to the Gardiner airport. At this time the party was shcim wildlife, 
the thermal areas, and other - aspects of Yellowstone. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon presented the foil 

Fate Place <> ttenc> xg I'icvie 

November 18 Measer School, Vernal, Utah ""250 Your Yellowstone 

November 25 Brigham Young University 30 Ceyserlaru 

College Professors and Your Yellowstone 

November 28 Rotary Ladies Nite, Livingston 6k Your Yellowstone 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 

The shutters were placed on all wayside exhibits and on the Norris Museum 
foyer on November 1. The brush piles which were stacked during the clean-up 
around the Norris Museum were burned on this date. 



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The Carpenter Shop manufactured tops for the exhibit cases at Old 
raithful, and the Faint Shop painted them. Park Naturalist 3eal took them to 
)ld Faithful November 29 and placed them on the cases. 

Park Naturalist Herkenham devoted a great deal cf time during. November 
io returning to the files and otherwise checking and caring for artifacts, photo- 
graphs, negatives, and other materials used in the preparation of the Old Faithful 
luseura exhibits and the West Yellowstone Information Station exhibits. This 
aaterial has new all been carefully checked and put away. 

The stage coaches on the Mammoth Museum porch were covered on November ll ; 
md the Museuw closed, 

research and Observation 

Mr, Slmer Armstrong called cox- attention to a black bear hi! ing den 
war Grand View Point* T .is den was visited by Park Natural istsCc 
lerkenhan on November 1 fc be occupies rown- 

:olored black bear* The den is in a vary convenient spot for observation and 
-hotography and is only about £0 feet from the Grand View par' a :, It 
Is plaruied to visit this de If feather conditions are sue t will 
>e suitable for photography. At that time an attempt i to ret a 

lumber of good pictures of - mation. 

On November 2 a fcri] iade to the Upper Cc for the purpose 

>f observing thermal, activities, cleaning uj - of tl e 1 features, and 

Joing some work in the Museum, The h. of removed 

from Bonita Pool, ■< ■:>.£■ a large amount of debris was cleaned froi i ling Clory 

^ool. faisy Gej ser has returnee 1 to its general mode of en intervals 
fere observed to be between Ig and 2 hours in length, 

of Park Naturalist Condor, caade a trip tc Valley with Chief 

ianger Otto Brown on November 2-?. On that i the bison raanagement 

sontrol operatic s, 3 rge number cf bull buffal road 

>etween Alun Creek anc LeRardys Case* . otion pictures and 

ix 5 black anc white stills of the management operatic ans 

Iressing out buffalo carcasses, as well as pictures of the , ' ng used 
to drag the care asses to the roadside* 

Park Naturalists Beal and Herkenham visited the Lover i r Basin 
lovember 30 for the purpose of observing, photogra , g r'ata on 

the bison management operations in that area, 

Kenneth B, Armitage of the University of Wisconsin subasitted a report 
wi his research and observations for the 1955 season of the marmot colony on 
the Snake Fdver near the South Entrance to fV-llowstone Park, Mr* Armitage has 
gathered SON very -interesting data on the social habits of marmots, and his 
report has been placed in the pamphlet file of the Yellowstone Research Library, 
ir, Armitage plans to continue this research for two years or more and, upon 
:ompletion of the study, will publish a detailed report on his observations. 



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At the month's close word was received from Park Ranger Naturalist 
Joseph Murphy that the University of Nebraska is lending iiim to Yellowstone, 
probably in January, for the purpose of making; winter observations on t 
Mammoth Hot Spring Terrace area so that he can gather data which will be 
incorporated in his research problem on the ecology study ing 

for his doctor*s degree on this area. 

On November 30 Park Naturalists Kerkenham and Beal collected specimens 
of algae fi treld Tool in the Norris Geyser Basin. These specimens were 
sent to .Mr, A. II. Hanszen, who is doing graduate work study at the University 
of Texas, 

During the month a large collection of scats from a variety of the 
large mammals, wh.'. d been collectei aaer and fall months, were 

sent to 'r, i . JSoore, Professor at the Louisiana Polytechnic Institute 
at Rustcn, Louisiana* i . doj plans to have graduate students make intensive 
study of the seats and an1 zt art on the 

findings of his students. 

On November 2£ Fark atura] Beal prepared a beaver skin for 
tannin • This animal was obtained from ammoth water in-take are? 
District Ranger Grimn as a nana! b control re. 

Library 

The books which « fcc the ietej October were 

not returned durinj . , but it is hoped that t ill arzive early in 

December. 

. ellc. &ry t i... .elation purchased a number 

of books for so res wiodicals. The n 

of Library use during Hbvember la as folio- 

. ... receii 

. nes received 25 

iphleto received 12 

Books in circulation 37 

Books on indefinite loan 216 

Natural History Association 

The September-October issue of Yellowstox . was muitilitiied 

and assembled, and the November-December dumr:iy was prepared, reviewed by the 
Editorial Board, and should be completed during the first week of December, 

A large number of koclapliries were sent to Mestons for duplication on 
November 7, ±»nd at the end of the month these slides have not been return* . 
During the month the order for duplication of 7k slides which were sent to 
Mestons in October was returned and the Association paid for this duplication 
work. 



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The manuscript for Wayne Replogle's booklet, Yellowstone's Bannoc k 
Indian Trails, was thoroughly checked and then sent to Smith -Brooks Printers 
Ln frernrer "for a final estimate of printing costs. At the end of the month no 
word has been received as to the possible cost. 

The National Park Service Auditors recommended that the Association 
adopt a new bookkeeping procedure. The present system is satisfactory, but in 
their opinion, the Association could be using a much better one. 

Park Sat erkenhem brought the Association's property card 

file up to date. 

On November 15 the association offered for sale on a competitive 
bid basis two 16hb sotj pid ' projectors which vrere out-dated. These are 
a ell and Hovel], model 130-B, lantrfactured in 1?36, and an Eastman, model FB-2J>, 
manufactured in l?hO. ' Is on these machines will be opened necerober 1. 

Par ' revision 

of his father's book, Story o \ j_r_ Ye llowstone, which the Yellowstone Library 

and Museum Association plans to pub'j of V 

• :■ purdiasec Ls lti- 

Lith supplies an; : - for a bo in pi 1 ' si t| Yrllpy&ta-\v ■■tet" 

Equipment and Supplies 

Pari re eal rear t part rage 

area on Vovombor 17 to facilitate access to plumbing fixtures in the Museum 
basement. 

Photographic a,v V.r v.ial ;.-.c3 

A large number of 3 r. 10 gloss spared 

in the dark room. Prints of were sent 

to red Witto' ■ . ' . re sent 

to the Division of infer. nation a r 17. >" 10 prints of 

the elk induction cperations v/ore sent to the On^ha v orlc~ ; o r':V • 18. 
Several kodaslides of Interpretive activities were sent to !>rew Chickj Chief 

Park Naturalist of the National Capitol Parks, for use in film strip, 

About 7U0 duplicates of 7i* kodaslides of flower? ved fr 
Meston's. Park Naturalists Herkenham and Parkinson devoted considerable time 
to the classifying, checking, and filing of these kodaslides. 
added tc the field sets for use in presenting evening programs. 

Park Ranger Natural! it Parkinson devoted the greater part of his 
working Booth to dark room work where he made several hundred prints from the 
b x 5 negatives. Through this work he is bringing the printing and filing of 
negatives up to date. There are still several weeks of work remaining in order 
to baring this particular aspect of the work to a current condition. 



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There vere 36 - li x 5 negatives exposed during November, Most of these 
were made of the bison manage.. -eat operation c. There were 300 feet of l6iraa koda- 
chrone movie film and 1 roll of R-135 Cilia sxposed during the month. 

Respectfu.il 



"David de L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 

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Acting Superintendent, Yellowstone January 10, ' 

Chief Parle Naturalist 

iionthly Report for December 1955 
>c.lal Activities and Conferences 

On December 1, Chief Park Naturalist Co and Clerk * lice Quiet 

I Yell cr.r- tone Library and Museu-: -elation spend c irable t ±ng 

;ociation matters wftl rvlee Auditor . & December 8, the 

Lef Pari: naturalist completed and submitted to a&sJnistratife Officer Anderson 
letailed suonary of antic5.i38.tod i 'ituros for the balance of the fiscal ye , 

On Deeeraber 12, CI -turalist Condon attended a special meeting 

Ld in Act:'. or intendent 1 Hamilton 1 s Office fea of reviewing the 

seible e ofDJ... : prayiag on fish popu] Yellowstone River 

i tributaries. In attendance at this meeting were . , - . ' - ' Johnson 

the United States Forest Service, :' ■ . oil Ad,-.: , . . nd 

Ldlife Service, 'issoula; Boyd Opht ^r^r Biologist, Bozeaan; Mr* Steele, 

shories Biologist, Boseaanj . itti Servic 1st, 

, Otto Brown, £ --" Ranger, Hr. Harold Chlei ^ger, 

a Chief Park Katun list. 

ti?ious Services and Chapel Use 

The Yellowstor.- - • for regular 

■folOTtsnt cervices. A } Chad service w on 

ristaas Eve at 6:30 p.n. there was a special Candle-I ervice ored by 

uth Fellowship organization. This was a Jed bies 

MstHTioth and Gardiner. The special Christmas services were well attended by 
•ibern of bot-h communities. 

The regular Sunday School services ware Chapel e a 

rning at 11 a.% e cept on Christmas day. 

On December 13, the Superintendent's Churr dttee held a v»ei 

the Chief Park Natural*--;. 1 Office for the : e of reviewing rel 
rvice programs. At tills meeting special guests, were invited in addition to 
gular neibers of tb* ooianittee Mr, lattson, .;-. "nderson, hr. Sorts and lir. 
adon being in attendance, the cocial visitors r. Huntley Chili , 

ry Armstrong and /x. Walter Kittojac of t - 10th Church Committee, 

ting Superintendent !&ailton and Pev. huane "lurphy. 

-Service Training 

Interpretive Division continued to mz.v > and distribute 

2 Yellow-tone Weekly i<ews . 

Park Naturalist shea continued to jive instructions to Park 
nger Naturalist Ted Parkinson in dar 1 - roon techniques during t th. 






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rk Naturalist Herkenhan and Dave Beal gave to oreient Mrs. .Mice 

rphy on her duties as a -stenographer in the Division. On December . 

.turalist "erkenhaa projected two in-service trail rs of the 

el on Build" o Suppress- ion. 

Park Naturalist Dave Beal was on dul »pet for asmml leave 

iken or. December 2, 9, 29 and 30. Park Natural!? 4 - ' T er' 

>r ! urs annual leave token on December 1. Hatur was 

i annuel leave from December 16 to .<: end of t th. Clerk-Stei er 

i, inona Moore terrain ■ t»r services aa ele- - ' in th- [.vision 

; the close of duty en December 16. Mrs. 
icember 13. 

\oe Murphy entered on duty as c" p»cfeejiiegra.pher in the Chief 
O* :.atr Hat's Office on the naming flf re fiber 19 and v or the 

tlance of t tenth. 

Park Naturalist 'orkenhaia completed copies of a rd For 

sr the Yellowstone personnel office. 

Par 1 : Ranger/ Ted Parkinson terminated his services at the close of 
ity on December 16. He was on duty during December up to that time with 
cception of tv. r o hours annual leave taken on Dec 1. 

The Naturalist Division sent to all see&OBal personnel and seasonal 
armor p ir annual Chriet Letter, con/ c l c ed with 

lis report, 

it pr^retive .:'erv*css 

There v. r ere no general interactive activities offered to 
iarin£ the month of Dec* ' er. Que reel of 1 -ion pictures entitle' 

ind" was tent en loan to Mr. Clyde, Kittitas, ton. The ere 

jtvrned by ■oath, 

ActiYi-.r'os Jid Exhibits 

Glass for t tag louvers in the exhiMt c 

rs ordered on Deeember 2. 

Three oil pointing's by \ , 'ert f, tfillieats were rece-'.ve-:l ffr< 
lie Natir - ryice Museum Laboratory in aid-Doce her anc 

Bee: I and properly stored. .'- .Natur Dave Beal dev ys 

e working month tc o of wit on -ecially herl " ; dy 

kins. Mounts and cases in the 'rented with 

•iys and then covered. 

tBS&ESk find Observation 

At the clone of November and early December besver caused consider 
rouble in the water supnly li ,he Mammoth community and U of thi 

litaals had to be killed. 3 of ere akl&ned out T ibers of the Interpretive 



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Division and their hides wm p an December 2, to Ler re for 

tanning. These were all skinned so that if it ia e-slse 

raour- c from them. The skinr.' 

and r ere ti » Livi 

A collection af insects loade last sunricr own by Chief Park 

fcturalist Condon wore sent to tericsj tery in 

lor examination and classif ication. If-' «elaans aa ifaatesry 

the: oally ba returned to I t.or.e. 

1 :e correspondence was carried on vi . Booth < I , 

BoUep oesibili . rown a ©ting 

a research study on the distribution of laassaal allow* , 

On or 12 an. att to travel 

bo lake for t bison 

vere bli: ad bloekad J o . On 

>ec" " , ' ■ were open, aal an'' 3nhc 

inent the entire &e,j in t yd.en Valley and Lake area and. obtained motion 

sicturos i ree of the ion.s, 

Clerk-L'teno r r Alio. prepare I copies o ' 

per on " ' -~ Fish and ! iv fclij 

log tie aenth. 'one Park ■■•.-? :*rary 

phlet file. 

Pork Naturalists Beal and c sd an the bear in its 

Libernation den at Grand View Point on December ] . is animal seesied well 
ad bet f inch awake. 

library 

During the month a v c reful ehe< aade on 

lubscriptions subscribed to by the Library and the 

rvice. These were ices 

|olua»es were as: . The be to 

[he Dieter binding Company had not been retur 

latter was written to then concern.". 

Beck* rece" L, 

'■-: 17 

Pamphl-- -/ed 25 

Books in Circulation 11 
Books en Inita loan 110 

i lrtural Istory Association 

During the month of December the Association provided the paper and 
rial -'"or the pre-jarf?.tion of Nat r . vembe- • her issue was 

Mithed and i on Dec . at in t3 

to the 'Hh. This nailing of Nature Bet* ded b- r-October 

|lat Hotaotocr-Dece stoev issues and considerable postage Wai saved. 



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The Al ' multi. f run- 

I r Q00 Yel Hews • on Decc. 7. 

The Association Bold to -V. Jac':- . i»s one c- 
motion picture film "Your Yellowstone" ♦ This was sent 

was charged the cost to ' or thli . - 

to Mr. Haynei Chief ut i imp- 

ound track narration on the f.i « 

The Association receive-, duril sot of aerial 

si otog* of Yellowstone. ?h' ■•ion 

4,50 r view of Yellc: 

to its boundaries and ovidod 

The January-February Yellowstone tor, du , 

p r oof r oa d and at icnths close is ready for I ' cutti ;>li- 

tion. 

•socirition employer . Alice uist as clerk &ur o month 

and ifc-e. Quist assisted by w the 

year inventory of book stock on hand an< reperi 

During the month of Kov s Assoeiatior for 

©ale to t lie two I6aa motion rk room 

enlarger. Invitations to bid were sent to church organize!." , ools near 
the park, posted at pc ices, and sent to "duals 

sight be interested in bidding on on. 8. Bide were opened Dec 

by the Chairman of the B oard. There were only 3 pe°Ple oid 
and the enlarger was awarded to Mr* Cle Quist and Chief Par London 

was the ier on both motion picture projectors. Th 

e bid on the silent Km Bell • footer but oretary 

Chief naturalist declined the bid en the Ee ion. 

picture projector since it was felt that t - 

figure than the successful bid figure . 

&Bmk lfi& Supraies 

The property inventory for properties charged to this division 
completed in the first part of the aen1 11 inventor it. 

for by the Chief Par?; Naturalist on December . 

During the month Park -oughly se: 1 of 

the Bell and Howell 16rei motion pieture projectors and placed them in re. 
for another seasons use. 

•:p : ..'.c ;^;d Visual Aids 

During the month 200 feet of I6ram colored motion picture and 1 
roll of 20 exposure KL35 were exposed of the bison management operations in 
addition to about 24, 4x5 black and white pictures made of the same sub.lect. 



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'-nts were prepar<-d and sent to Was illustrating 

fcrt heo« lng Yellowstone Park tmadside lnforaatloo folder, /^Ibo, 8x10 
glossy prints were sent to the Kiwsnis ;Sagazine and a number of prints were 
sent to the Park County News. These are all being used to illustrate 3 ellow- 
stone. 

Park I list Parkinson devoted ajor iart of icnt 

during the nonth to the completion of the jsrita f bl:c Lte contact 

prints for the photograph alburae. 

Respec tful ly smbtaltted , 

Davi> v . Condon 

uralist 

Condon 

Mr. Rogers r 

File 

Museura i 

cc 

DC and on/aba 





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aetfar Intendant, XMJowatcna February 6, ] 

f V&ek laturaXist 

Report far January 1956 






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The Chief Park Naturalist attended i ee 

a on January 5 and January 19, & special aoe' 

dlton , g c as attended on fternoon a a of 

q*illn£ data for prosentfttlon to be aa4» at mtane Laga on 

wary 1.3, l/> and 3 . 

Ch Jsmmry 11, a Bpec 
printer. 
■aying on ■" Te In ; ver &r 

I socti&c VH P, . 

•vice at J&sspoula, Montana} Hr. t, ! , . 

, Olive . -ope, 8< , ildlif' r. Bon ntana 

ite Fir-' rtraent j .".. ■ to 

Mm; Jo ^offej 

On January 9 a conference •:,; 

.tect no* late 

be installed on the J ' ■ *- Sanyo 
I the Harris cutoff road to t 

Chief Park Ife.tural.iBt Cera 
ga In Billings Jen" . • 

illton, Btc titans, Chief r Brow 

January 18, Garry 

rlas i ' -turcs of t'-e Uncle 13 vera a In- 

itlon 6 trail rt 

filed by Mrs. 
Hat t Geor rdfcrup, 

OR .T^lflff assl CfofioeA Use. 

The regular Protestant v -uo servicer vare held ir 

tional Park Chapel at . . 

■nary 1 by mas J. Josopliine Laccae; 

Kattaiaa am 1 orry. 

on the park tlarcugh January 3 . 






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ftjfllfllir rUmliij ehool • r/ cos were held in the u'~- : ■ :<ane Hati< -.1 
terk Sundav at 11 a. . 

The Rev. Warren W, 0' . ectcr of 

; •■ '■ •■:c\.^ :■ the c urehes - Christ arrived in v ..'ilv • toro or: Janmry li 
oaate€K T thraag* . The Eev, Qsrt pre c 

Chief Fferfc 8atur; raetionir 

Jbwrch CflBB attended th* 'Jaunty 

ry 20 e ■tMrtMW- 

issocl^tio TTopocv o aver 

ton # 
r com .^ian of thl* saatter, 

ravarec -xalnfr ' . . ■erviec< 

■T <a. The Par .on. 

■ can to a* • -3sy 

o&t&nt Service in Yellowstone anr . The 

qtf Par' ni cat J of 

c rfc with th0 Bev. 

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, HSran foot-. If© 

laujftgmnv to that have bet 

(to - &I ton, Chit- . or 

pluardj:, i . 

pf 

hbtelned for rpose of saaki o 1 -vie or 

Lnnn^wmn* prograrai. 

py 11, a nseet teen 

building . . time 

m talk by '•Mrntad to th sea, 

Lai' a in attentianee at t-v- . c ■■■ ■ ■ - oal 

pf the recording narration in ton 66 pro^re 

khe large tope rec- largr en to 'sat to 

■ad •' tioe le betr Ined in omr filea* The : lee 

Mntlinied. to miaeograph «o«i distribute try. 



■ 'ie santh. I levies -ties were uae 

the presentation of eev Ide Tel I . The fc 

? : Izm en loan a» \ted thorn. 



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laal Jieavea 1-3/56 :ttn, I 

cur Itl] -ne 2/24/ 

Wteti leaven 3/3 ool 

1/2A/56 



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A oet of ;ee wt Tollov tAft «wit to . tben 

:owitai for t 

«M»st!. ntar/ Cirib trier*. 

Chief Park Ratur 3 
; foTltr I 

• legion Pasrt 
Jam*ir 

;tana Wildlife Fadaniticn - Bl] 
a&ultfc ir &iao© # 

VT-Ultic. 

artist Point, tarrta 

lahXtarardt for Ian ir w& 

atursjiiet- 

."" :. ■ - 19 IB* 

Liiiinn 

RattaraliBt Co 

■*al 3* . , aif 13. 

porr cm J« . vtel 

be cr. . ■■■ t for ' leave 

Itecographor Alice 11 nor 
mtkmx Jar 1 to t -:1, bssi 

1 1 m ' . 

Ifer -d to f: oo . ,r. 

The ja? " f . recoa . 

knpletad «tx ! tted to t for r 

fee the 13th. 

■ivwlL applications for ac^&a&raont a? tm- tfi hatu 

Imb received from pen ate vh« 

V y aeaa s and t. deeirourc of rr nc arf: tort. 

'JTObRbl. 

for the 1956 eeaeo . 





















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Beeeojnch end Observation 

On Jar fttarall 

oology • o». . ■«« 

in' -i»ls on a Yellowstone subject. 

mttrrallsts 
for ^e of 

day out *i 

take of Yelleuntane ©Ik. On t I 

of jtio irt acr 

Bin- obtaining pioi ' tion or 

iron sr«a« " ere lr. 

r ' . 

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«n<! a . ok 

January •-' " »d until tbe 381 . 

bud eoou and 

Peea&tlea 
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|NUr 

den/ to library - 

■ Tannery 28 Chief P list 

f ;, tot 

in th ' -l«yw 

Lower V- e uectioe.. e, Leon eo 1st 

totale Ion 

to- 
Bf el'-, :?are e - 
tany n nt not 
■he ' :ver© sb 
,t »r t it will be heavy jrtaX? ! , 

Par • I ' - ■ - Jsmaar 

3 M»3B . 

ctures of the \ act.lv .eysor 

-o-Cat vhltth war, W& for ion. A goodly war:- 

ere ebeei v vod br' an lake Vint antf is Gey. 5 in wi1 

lajov ration .'SO animala being at Clear W*t< 1 

- --•■ - --.- ■ i- - — .:. 

o*ing the saonth of January * r aeat out let," o 8 



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i copim o. so L . . M Ui MliP"- .-.—- 

*• tea cm 4 he cosste for reprfa . "-^ 

mt n receive- =stab- 

book g &8SK *V Col,3 y v ' for ° ajCter 

Mdnatior, it w*aa dot- It aa a »a3 ? iea at 

■,?opi«e war© purohaoad for r ; 

Ismv&ry 5, tl*e books iwnt to the Mator Bookbinding Co 
ng and repair were ■ *r»ie»8, *ae viore e 

id ret . the etoc v 

&n excellent job 
ttm vciiMoa have bees our 1 . Thi il*t 

autivo SttJWB^KPJT of t9 
oroY t .station. 

. ector*.- laeetiiv I ). 

nvotifl ^pib of -itaraxy 

. ftueua I '' Bsjy 

T?^o following directors we: -'.;viw»t 

Jac "&« : Joffe 

. faailton ; '2re*?R 

Alio© 'u i:' ■ . 

Pavid fie : . Co -.ice* 

^rs and Jo . Bi a ^re absent, 

•« le-f of reeigmticB frocs 1 
i 

4 %>3e. or de^iepaaRtis o£ si 

*£ . : icm of a how m t« Boa.r 

he aseoeistion, A cc . I j ©pearl* 

t slder^bfe eerra b mm c 

«lth-Sroo' -.jay Hit) ect fee 

riniir. antii* . _. ilgU 



ayno F, Replof&e. Co*- ;'3$p*esa foaa fc do m of 

■hi: tttttiolpet " ' r2y 

u February. 

■'• Naturalist 

math of -..ha selection of ee] :um 

* ^-' *3#nfe o£ Yellow? tcr.c r,o 

wblitfh eonei ' da spring. Hr # hieh 

e to be oao ,9 ?e;Uo>K-toiY?'f? i^3u£^ JL . -.-aUfi »«*» mpe we 

rred to ths Saith-JSrooka rabli ny, 

so Quiet served ae clerk for the A a.-' n41ed < 

book sales from the stock room. 






















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largo mnO books were received frcr.i the Dieter 

ipwsy and in addition a number of books wore gRvehaMd and period 
■arshleta received. The library wa ed by a mste 
is boobs have been relented on loan. 

Bootes received 4 

Jtegaslnes 

Books in Circulation 11 

<>f - -r '■■ efts! i Sam 114 



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Tuo large Baleptlcir taore res 

he Chief r ■ ■-' ■ ■ Incd thaa fro 

be nr eject opaque e >oso 

s the ion of ln«aervlce-' ; $g afttt , These ed on 

anr -o.nl servi' place 

ition for operation on January . 

Dur * north a nunljor of 2000 ft 16<sa rae • an 

.sccsrtnsnt of »oMon picture shippir 
dbrary w*3 Mssetsa Aseoelatior- - Color irlttctlcns, Inc. 

ased eeve" • :«r cord!? f«p use wtv Lei ill be 

itrt of the portable public address units. The;/ i yired spare .. tubas, 

other supplies for 12s© with the I6au pro jee tore aw t nil . 



T3 "ograia fro -actor* tat on 

anuary 9. It was reviewed on J f 10 and presented to the omple 1 

anuary 11. This peo&tm war hipped to 






It was detoralned desirotr, to obta^.sdditioaal footago «f 
operations a eWff&tt&e film was pure 

.'aonth was ewtposed 450 ft. of 3 

Icr- 'eture fil. ., ■<■ lx$ black and white negative rool of 

edaslldes. 2h the dark rooo. there «tre 100 lcx5 contact prini . 10 

.0 enlargeriiants . 

SfclO glossy print© of Yellowstone were sent to 

lings Gasette for use In Illustrating articloe published by thea. 8x10 
■■rgeraents were tmSm on Big Hols Battlefield Ratli 

1 1*8.' t!ve use by Up. icCotaas. Pictures of over snow ermipnent were seat 

lie Yoeeaite Rational Park. 

Bark Jfeturaj jTkenhaa devoted considerable t a develop 

Ind filing of 35na kcdacliropiss which he received from s« 



.-ondon 

ls« Rogers 

r He . David de L. Condon 

Museum U^ 

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Superintendent, Yellowstone Rational Park , 1956 

Chief Park Batur .list 

Monthly Report for Febru ry 

■Ipec" _ ctivities an d Conferences 

.hruary 6 and until the 14th, the painters were 
VOT Lb the offices of the Interpretive Division and there was consider- 

able confusion "with respect to where tfe ere and for proper worki 

operations, On the 14th, however, the offices were placed back in order 
and are, we think, very attractive. Savers! changes ,-rere riade in the pictures 
and in other- ft duties W*& in the offices to be in keeping with the new 
paint 

The I] iIOK 66 progr i . sduled to be presented to tl 
Gardiner Chamber of Co a sree > . February 21 ' bo be cancelled d:ie to 
Glacier Rational Pari; failing to conform to the schedule set up for use 
of this program by Yellow - : Glacier, Mr. Joseph, Superintendent 

of Glacier was called long distance on the 15th bi ' ted that they 

could not ie program to us in tine for our use Lst since 

Glacier had a program scheduled for that a; te. 

Chief Park h bur list xa attended the regular staff 

tings which were held on February & and 16. 

F.eli rdous Services and Chapel Use 

The regular church services were held in the Yellowstone 
tioaal Park Chapel each Sunday morning at 10 a.m. during the nonth 
the Sunday School services were held at 11 a.m. 

The Superintendent's Church Cosssittee held a meeting in the 
Chief Park Naturalist's Office on February 2? with all comitte 
present, Kr« J. Stanley Fillmore >er appointed 

by the Superintendent. At the co nolttea satin j officers were selected 
for the con.~i.ttee and these were: Chief Park Naturalist Condon - Chairman, 
and Administrative Officer Ernest R. I. Anderson - Secretary-Treasurer. A 
special circular was prepared for the Superintendent and was distributed to 
■3J . •.nent employees outlining th< srs of the committee and their 

responsibilities . 

It the committee nesting a decision was made on the memorial 
which would be placed in the Yellows to I L Park Chapel in memory 

of r '. lay E. Hamilton by the Hamilton Stores i&nployees. .his memorial 
will be a conrounion service set consisting of a base, trays, cover 
glasses for communion service for 160 people. Ihe Chairman of the sofflaittse 
has placed an order ;clth the ivhitteriore Associates, Inc. for this. 



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vice Trainim; 

The Interpretive Division continued to mimeograph and distribute 
the Yellowstone's Weekly jevra. 

On February 16, in the Canteen building, the International 
Harvester sales r L-ive presented a series of movies to personnel 

of the various divisions on a sanitary fill refuge d 1 program and 

on the use of International Harvester tractor type equipment, 

On February 21, a Caterpillar Tractor sales repres ve 

presented two movies to employees and these were entitled "The Last .-tile" 
and "The Gambler". Both of the movies were on the proper use of '-.eavy equip- 
ment. On this same date, the 1 feion pictures t: ?.lk and bison 
r-janagac.ent operations were reviewed. 

Interpretive Services 

During the month the follow! vies were out on loan and 

were providing interpretation of Yellowstone^ resources to ces 

removed from the park. 

i,D AN 2 . . - .otts Bluff 11 month. 

kL HSATO - Jack Clark, Yerria to , Nevada, Feb. 11 
- 3upt. Great 3w>ky Its. Feb. 6. 

bre Haines, »t. Rainier et>, 16. 

- Hart - Rocky Htn. HP aU month. 

- . rt . looker, .<oswell Sportsman Club, 
Boswell, Indiana, Feb. 24 

Museum Activities and Sxhibits 

Park IJaturalist Herkenhani prepared a detailed st it on 

the technique and procedure followed in handling photograph negatives, 
print*, etc by Yellowstone. This detailed information was sent to 
Dinosaur national Monument to be used by them as an aid in setting up 
a system for that area, 

A set of rock specimens of Yellowstone was sent on indefinite 
loan to the iSkalaka Schools at Ekalaka, Montana to be used by them for 
educational purposes. 

Personnel 

Park • list Beal was on dut/ all month except for one day of 

annual leave taken on Febrviary 1. Pfcrl turalist Herkenham was on dut all 
month. Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all eonth except for sick leave 
taken February 1 and 2. Cierk-3tenographer Alice 'lurphy was on duty all 
month except for leave without pay taken Febru r, d 24. 



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Conferences were held with Park Maturalist Seal and Herkenham 
on lections and field aca its for the 1956 season. 

Considerable time was devoted to the discussion on these ; on the 
2?, 28 and 29 • On the 29th the final select! or, was made from the applications 
submitted and letters will be written soon to B, title,/ McClelland, Dermis 
J. Brown, Ilichard K. 3chroeder, Elmer fcndsreen R. Phillips.. d 

George Downing concerning employment. 

Research and Observations 

Park Naturalist Beal was in the field on the 6, ", , 'i/th of 
February and Park Naturalist Herkenham was on the field 
on the 3, 9, and 10th. These men were making field observations of 
elk management program arid obtaining 16mm motion pictures and black and 
white pictures of the operations. Koda chrome slides o s operations 
were also taken. These pictures on the operations were t or use 
for future interpretive and public relations work. 

The annual report on research in Yellowstone National Park 
was completed and sent to the Regional Director and Director on February 13. 
A total of 43 research projects were apposed or in progress and 10 were 
completed during 1955. 

. allace ilennessy, a former park t naturalist, submitted 
a proposed program to conduct a Scientific Expedition for young people into 
Yellowstone national Park c ■ the 1956 travel season. This program was 
reviewed in detail with the Superintendent and it was deter 
Ilennessy had a very fine idea and a letter approving the program mid ask: 
for further information concerning it was sent- to p. [ennessy on the 28th. 

On February 27 , Chief Park Naturalist Condon and Park list 
Beal collected 80 gallons of snow from the Black' . This 

snow was placed in 10 gallon milk cans and tightly sealed, the parpo 
of the collection was to got water which is to be shipped to the National 
Bureau of Standards at Washington, D, C. attention of Dr. Dibler. 
for this pure snow water was received from Dr. Fried .... 

The water Maples to be sent to Washington will be 3 5-gallon cans and it 
is anticipated that they will be shipped right after the first of March. 

Park Naturalist Beal prepared an ai'ticle for Yellowstone -Jnture 
Notes on "Deaths Occurring Among Birds and Insects in Small Caverns near 
Terrace Spring". A summarisation on the species found in the caverns on 
September 16 is made in the report. 

On February 9, Chief Park Naturalist Condon discussed with 
Acting Superintendent Hamilton Betters pertaining to the topographic 
map of Yellowstone, and he indicated to Mr. Hamilton that in a discussion 
with Mr. Longhofer last September he had adhrised Mr. Langhofer that a 
topographic map made to the scale of 1-125,000 would be • - satisfactory 










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map for distribution to the public. A map of I la conveniently 
snail for people to p t e, fold and use Lt in the field. ade to 
a larger scale would be an inconvenient carrj use. 
Langhofer wa3 also told that if mps were made of t ortant sections 

t scientific ureas that the;/- should be nade to a scale of at least 
1-2400 and should have a contour interval of no more than five feat. 
scale would be especially useful In ra&l areas. 

On February 29, r. Ntertl i Parks of ' n was in 
Chief Park Naturalists Office and spent some time discus3in tic 
insect research projects which he hopes to carry on in conjunction 
the profe: . State College. Mr. Parks was anxious to obtain 

a collecting permit and vr . ven appli cation forms to be complet 
him and the Montana 3tate College Professors who 
this study. 

Natural -lis tor j Associ .tion 

. rs. dice H. >uist was employed by the Association during 
the month of February as clerk and spent a good deal of her time filing 
black and white prints In the photograph albums a ring negative 
prints for filing in the official records which were t n 1954-55 • 
Park Naturalist Herkenham spent time working w . ..uist and super- 
vising the work. 

On February 15, we received front r . 'erma Bi L the manu- 
script for the revised edition of the ?', E. This manu- 
script contains hl3 pages and some letters have been written to prospective 
publishers making inquiry concerning their interest this 
book for public sale. 

Park Katurallst an prepared a list of publications sold 
by the Associ -tion and! this was sent to the Regional Chief of Interprets.. 

The Association has det id to set ew bookkeeping system 
and the necessary forms, binders and other materials were purchased and 
with the aid of '.r. Ills K. Gabbert, .Irs. Alice uist, Claris tsaoci- 
ation, has begun the installation of the new bookkeeping syst 4 

On February 15 and 16, the January-February issue of Yellowstone 
Nature 'Totes was multilithed and on January 17 these were sent to 
on the railing list. Sam de replies have been received from 
articles in this Issue and some of the articl nblished in the 
magazine sections of newspapers. 

The Associ tion acquired 200 copies of tie book GER 
by Colbr and these will be handled a r L*s Itsa during 195 . 

The Association purchased for the dark roo r safe and 
a safe light frou the wholesale Photography Supply Company in Chicago 
and it hat placed an order with the Turtox Company for 25 bird slides and 9 
slides of reptiles and anphibians for addition to Yellowstone interpretive 
slide sets. 






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The minutes of the Annual meeting of the Association which 
was held January 26, were typed and filed ready for use at t 
of the Association. In addition to these minutes copies were r d of 
the new constitution and bylaws of the Associ ..tion . iopteci 

these were sLoeo e ted* A copy is attached to this report. 

Library 

During February a number of new books w r ed b the 

Association and sortie were received as gifts. 

Books received 6 

liag&aines XI 

Pamphlets 19 

Books in circulation 8 

Books or, indefinite loan 113 

iJEtaent an d Supplies 

The large public address units which are used at ■ , 

Old Faithful and Fishing Bridge were thoroughly serviced by park list 

Beal. Mr. Seal also examined the small portable units and determined 
additional parts necessary to repair thorn. An order for these parts, 
especially rdcrophones, was placed with the Allied Radio Corporation and 
delivery is expected in early Hare , 

Photographic and Visual Aids 

On ebruary 23, 15o 2x10 prints (bleedout) were made for 
in illustrating the Am -eport on Information and Int live Services. 

A number of pictures were sent out during th n to intei 

parties for use in illustrating articles. These were 3 8x10 to the State 
Department for use in the nagazine "America" which is to be circulated in 
Russia and its "atelites. Five 8x10 prints were sent to Mrs. ton- 

rques of the Washington, D. C. Free L ritera. These pictures will 

be used to illustrate an article on "Wildlife", Negatives of bison herds 
were loaned to ' r. om tfcHugh which he had prints made of for use 
article on "Bison ", 

5 kodachrome slides were sent to th rln dent, 

Springs National Park on February 14 as a gift from Yellowstone. 

Photostatic copies of legal documents were made by park natural 
Herkenham on February 2S for the U. 5. Commissioner. Three copies each 
■••ore; tade of these seumentea 

During the month park naturalist Beal and Herkenhan exposed 1200 feet of 
16mm motion picture film. This footage was taken of the elk .merit pr r 

and was combined with that taken eorlicr of t- ment opera tio 

In addition to the novies two roll3 of K 135 were exposed. 






























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Several 20x24 enlargements were :iade by Chief Park Naturalist 
Condon and these were tinted and mounted in frames for use in the office 
as wall pictures. 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park 1st 



Condon 
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Sunerlntendcnt, Yellowstone ftati rk 6, 1956 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly Report -irch 

Special Actlvlt3.es an/ Conferencec 

Chief Park Matstraliat attende- figs in the con- 

ference roan on fare 1 and 3 . 

Oc , in co'. .nd- 

scape Architect Mfttteon and ' - ' Canyon 

tta and also raaal 

ed. On irrch 1 , ence 

vit; . . . r on- 

cerning the Canyon ' or's C : 7 on. 

On the 23rd # another ( once m 

return Tom San "■-.-.. 

' Lee on the Canyon dc ., , 

4 , r. a, ■•. , r. Cole tan, and r. Re ore 

pre ' . 29th. the Chief •- " \ 

Ifcr rdt conceraii 
in t ' &em Courtys: . 

On '•>rc v - ', obinson, 

ed la- d I stance - of 

tor par titralists whic -, ■• . ' to 

Mr. ' son froa the Yellowstone Personnel office. 

Religions Ge rvicer ol Use 

a regular r School services were held in the Yellc 

Nation al o: c .-..a. LI, 

disnisse ' so tv t they c ol picnic at Lamar. ' 

service- sponsored fej - .-,' c ittee eld 

each Sunday in t g 1 at 10*00 a, m. with .. rpby co 

ing the services. On (5# ar servic , 

services vere held and Mr. Huntly . erinte] ' 

chir Lttee, after carry!- - Latiosj rre 

Association, Inc., ordered - , a eoarplete cc nun ion service for 

persons. This ea consists i .union 

lid, a glass filler 
pees o. ltd tores h ry of ©nee 

will hi ->-d u^o© it: In Memory o c ton, 1! 57 - 

by Hamilton stores Employees. 






















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In- e Training 

On Ifarch 13, annals 
at:? on , 1 on '• . on cor- I , * ' 

Infnrmtion ■ to six new 

or on duty In June, 

I 

list Beal od th< 

-S6E t.' . In- 

structors Off . -. eal \ one of 
La training in tJ r» buil 

Considerable time was devoted to provj . irley 

Van Gilder with reapeet to % of Clerk— ten- - - 

tifW Division. -lets Beal, ■ , 

voted k. 

: Interpretive Division c od to 
el] Q • . riday, ■ , . 

throe re . „ nt 

' ' ons and saf ety, Thej 

8. 

Inter ore 4 __ ej r r 

• !--ed a talk 
in - County Court! , ^ , -. ■ . 

Baal sated in 

■ , lonti ■ . " rt of the Hen 

•isored bv b- sieroe, 

eal too 

to -' . 

shown - -. . Letura, , : an 

I-farc 

p Naturalists Baal 'on re -7 ' the e< ft 

notcbc; ; , 

» in detailj 

,"",.' pert . . . . 

of I tata College, oeatelloj 

with I 

•t 

Elk . On/ 4 ., group 

hour tal i jal pa 

of -ces found in Yeilowstov- 

spent the be. Ian- . group 

east entrane ••otura. eon ir 

Sev motion pietura 

and of . - ■•■ , :. vie, ' , 

to 12C ! e. 0} . , , 

•inninf-," and w Yoseaite Nation* ." 









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Par • ••"• c- 

ture, "Tom* Xelloveten , le at - 

17. 

odaslides wn loaned £02 
or Tel! 9 • LLowet 

14- - 10 slid- o«ned ; . ■ , 

"Overton, Col< 
March 14- «■» 50 elide to • . V. 

Li 

March 16 - 6 c ' Dr. 

% . . . . 

16 . etios picture f 

Yell op. mb fed 

d»0 V - 

• Mrs. 

I . A2/56 f 

1 ) . 

- , 

to 

. Cortege, L« , 

- Carl T, Gilbert, 

S, 1*61 
Coll© , 

A great deal of t' 
esdii ill be 

a I- • conference 

tvCL$ v 1 r ■ 
m, 3c 
ful Courtyard eadsil 

■ '- 
turr.ed 1 . co, c 

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: " ■ " - 

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by Lt raaterial in 

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* ' Lace 

t. 

fro- . Lie 11 

nuseiri accc 

edaslldes and 6x10 bla< 
sv.l \;ere sent to 1 , . C. 

use in the Ma -1 zine. 

re- 
hCU 8 6 g installed c I •■ • 1. 



tal 1* March 9. or 

an : . . 

Clcr'c-L/tcr -• - on 

23. . . 

anoe of 

Co nta vs 
tai ..'. ' Brown, r r. RIch&n . ehroo&er, ':■ . -in, 

. Phillips, Mr. Rj , . 

ction of thai 0*5 , ' division 
lir e 1°5^ e« 

Rev job descriptions wor - -9 

permanent positions with - * - ''—11 

iy. 

On sarch 12, E^ark naturalist Herke 
aocopt a GS-.11 par' List position at Rod tional 1 

on and! Lis ■■ . 

•: an o dty to ac 

li-. it «»9 at Isle Royals , 

as* aandoah 

ortunities in favor o 

oeiticn v.-M ■ . im« 

Cor ienee was pr . 

oiiitaaent to 
in Tollcvstons. At the , no word , 

i 

On March 1, c toil 

d to Dr. ....-•. , :. . Jerry 

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. . continued far into the nl-kt. 

an 50 separate . elt In 

anr at Itattoth and 1 1 on 

at Lake reported 6b r j distinct shoe . 

I. story Assoc 

i Yelle >n insti 

into on, a new bookkeepd tew dttria 

dations Ltar'i t. Cos 

Nat- • ' ' t sad 93 at. relist ihara has been d«r tieaa v 

. uist on the problem of got . ' 

Gab .. ." contributed hla '* this 

work. 

proof for tl ~ boe , 

by le was received from - . 

be reviewed and returned as early e " . . 

-•elation has ordered its boa 
and by the nofitfofl clc . ' 

.turalist :• revie ad and revised, : ' ttb 

ant st - , t, kory of The 

asrr 1 ' - , let 

frc. J -re LithcpriE " , , . 

of 
J -. .rr 1 ' oourity 

Taxe9 for the employees of t on, 

■ciation pure teen bird and r« 

the Turtox Co . 

The Association has c ad its fusfl Hoc 

of books for the Yellowstone Park Library* 

for use wi1 e audiovisual aids ecf t of t 

• in used a nit 

Books received 6 

18 
ota 19 

Boe tfl ir C irculation 9 

Books on ' nite Loon 115 

1 library fnu , 

Jewell taade use of it on the . and 30th. to 

d by the Walt E ■'<-.' ivies c 

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■ - >li ier 

S ta en to J : 

on these 1> "t. 
veatherir. . 

i ^ k dravcr : - ad 

also two re: er 3x5 c . ' lea, lor 

Instrument carp, for several ^ing 

in condr; ' reser.;-. . 

bulbe ' - 



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\"t.ofrttfih lc and Visual . 



• 4x5 cent a 
in tha dark : ■ ■ . -led fro 

and prii a in t] . , 

fclon plottages vc of a ball 

!r ot lit c 

8bd 1 Bo 

r. - • ■logy 

'Leortology for children. 

~ot. 1 - 4x5 negat'v . t to 

in the director ' cc at Washis . . 

It pen i •■nent . Lctures 

on Yellow 



Da?vid de : . 
Condon 






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Superintendent, 'ellovaton ,.ial Park 

Chief Far 1st 

Me r ApriX. 
tecial Activ" 



The chief park .t attended M ices lis 

erence Kcora on April l 20 • Pi s on April , .'■ his 

roject in conference, and one-half nirae was spent on it on trie 30 * 

The regular ' are attevi. aief 

ark Tiatur. I 19 • 

. Pawl A, ahl ( .aeman, 

onta::a on April U bg Park Natural sal who e - . ■ of 

tost en t . 13 th. Pr, £ab,l i tout the 
alance of the aont . 

The chief park nat:?r?lie' ■; is 

be offered , . ten who are I i ial 

vice car- err, 4 ..tioiiS wer with resi 

. . . ■ . 

rese station tot t- 

ious Serv.ices ana 



A special Lsfl a&t< 3 Wis .ello ■ ool 

ark Chapel at . . , ■ LI 1. i'cllowin vice in the chapel. 

q Saater breaKBurt was server " i.i . „ , 

uane . U r etanfc services wr : a.m. 

ad re i tool war Id in the el at Hi 00 .... 

Friday, April 13, at 2i0Q p.m. fu aervic 

Lectrician !-eor issed away at vli'i 

tternoon, L 10, 1., . owet ic, 

• Walter Kittaawj Prayer, Andrew . tewartj '-l&cier nation, st, 

rdelle Carter elen la-: , i ston, ; ■, 

itional lark) Speaker, ■ L* on, vllovatofaej 

Lllmore, Yellowstone) Spea.. , lis, ! ' , Lo, 

sroa C ondon, Yellowstone} a ] , . 

MS the first funeral service to be conducted in the ?ellov:si:. tienal 

«■. i -1 , . I--, 

On April 19 ellow«tor;e Jark e rec < . 

fiittsore Company, tae camnunicn service eat t was iv>. es 

oyess ia -nonary of May Specicc- Hamilton. Thie :ce hat ..ced 

the Yellowstone Park Chapel where It la a 1 eee rel: 

hnosri, rations who conduct services there. 















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On i.pril 20, * le ter w&a j 

development oJ itone *% 

.5' I . r v&s l tg an art;! 

?n ' •. 

On rll S3 f a ward neeti llovat* mat 

hroteatant ninistrj • end - toe 

raa held i ' • aba » c o/*itte« 

rare invit - t in© 

How t ". '. one c ... • 

omjscn v 

- • 

On t&ke 

lias ion :.st's office 

r thai -o or s ' 

lata &r 

— 

lr|4 rk rro- 

eo'jr&s aaaec . 

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the 
■' Aprili A tal •. I t; il 

with 320 persons la attendance. . 

tie rot.r lub :. . . id a 

res 

amerce eg .h with . 



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th of April, . - ; which an inter- 

ret&tion of Sail out < Llowei 

1, 1 1 Animal aaYen* • i .el, ■ 

2 ehowinga to -sc-.s, 

2« c e.veere, cie, i 11 , :,. • * 

1 ahewir. La* 

3« Oe serlam', , . 

La* 
U* tl cf relieve to ie, Tallowatona t>ional ), . 

Melodies; Xart T. Gilbert, aovstone, 

. » iaven f , J, Jonas, Levi: - 

1 eb':vinf to 110 people. 
6* Your YejXXcaretone, . , «s*t . aria. 

1 ahovin - . ■ _. . 

?• v -ild Aalnal Hai > * 

6 ahen 2 people. 









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flans were atari* on April 3 tor % ce name ■ 

fhich voi-1 be placed at I. of 

these sign* were bein*; made at I c ..ill be 

lempleter: before the : ;n, . cf ' 

, - LI to the 

iirect rs and re L offices on April LO. .ved 

Ln cllovstono on />pril 22 and Museum J sllflt Flo 

►heae men are working on t Ion of detail its 

Ml included in t on Visitor Center bull :■ • 

Tho public rest roons wrc 
.3 vere re fced (qt the p , 

Tiniehed the iati Mr. ^en vas 

pnployed on April 85 to thorough! , 3 , 

ear. all the ; irtvres, an i to 

the J ublic en Say 1. 

The M ■ - 

xlso the blaekboi • 

Ld. 

Park ossion 

rcrk and on ref 
iter age. 

ersc;. el 



Pari . '.ham 

ras on d ' &13 m ft but left i 

rtain tat o la 1 Park* oat the <r ' . Van 

.r vas on 

On April 10, ists 1 

ihis reviev of their . 

: A} rll 2c t: 

>f their pi 

Ar s were i*u 

P. Morrell to serve as janitors at J 1 

fcueeuas for the 13>9~-> season, 

Arrangenrnnte v I e for the transfer . » 

ark r&.\ sition in rinosaur National Monument t -3 low- 

tone vice M» r. Beal who is being promo t; m - • 

erkenhasu . ...era will enter on , 1 . 

•search &svi Observation 



On Aj ril h 9 detail 
lere sent to HT« J • Freund, Profeeooi ^et., 



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piacks t ia. Nr, I U le to show 

statistical techniques. 

On April 9, Pari . relists' v. or sal spent -icon 

rks rill i erosion • on the 

Ye Hove tone Winter elk , Xodaslides* 1'aan movies, 

Mare sjtdsj of this. 

On April 18 a trip was made to 1 for tht 

on F-.useuas fc -r-nal areas. A total of 87 head of elk a 

in the meadows alon ieon ttiver for a cist. . son 

Junction, *'iftp-one bison were o bserv ed on the fc'cuataJ itain 

ion site. 

The Qtsttfc t«r was functioning on it, 1 sua! 

lot phase was observed at t i . . . this i re was 

ictivity on the part of til of the saw mts in front , th© 

vstraas Tree erupting to heifiits of l$ft« the 

jiant Cone normally only overflows Without violence, On ton, - 

ted to .ts in access of 20ft, for about I minut* . 

On April 18 so-. a to , r, Paul A, 

>f wildlife and geyaers. 

On April 20 a memorandum was written to 1 
•hat the;, supply as with 1 rds 

A Yellowstone* 

On April 30 at at , 

rare constant- the area owr . .... 

lldered ... 11 nts ;. \> set up a uerri.fi 

rrer the town, i occasions thev flew 
>t tnem nipht meet lahap, 

&rds wer«> found. One had Btr ck It the 

el heating plant, 
lloweU' k study-akin collection. 



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jnd observe, t ions on April 

MB time was spent on April 3 # u» aw 5 review 
fee fellavstone Plants book which has prepared U. ... acBou . l and 

»z-ma 3a f • 

The Stcry of Old Faithful Le: scr ... 

peoght up to date I the iirfVc era* ., are, 

he proof on the revise? a. os was returned 

hecked end &t t close Edwards rs wan reee c. r ting 

ad Ltional 10,000 copies of the publieati< . 



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Pi; .list Herkonhara devoted c rable t ul review 

f the £ alley proof on tfa; 1 1 le's booklet, " ndian 

. ■ t back B or April 17 anci .fin, 

9 I 1*4 to Telle* stone en » April 

, Thir Lioation is row being print* ' i . 

. i* aeeeciatio I to pera< 

Park copies c , . 

aooka were phi ■ 1 ?3. 

J uri.itf Arril & largo portion c 
re receive*' end these have been soae o. 'don 

> t • field. 

aesiel 

mri pro -'its. • ■■ M . ,OQQ < loo 

>f t "Fact i r ; '. - \c,e 

iuiet in the Bdiwogrsphinj itiLsort data cards i intent 

ration acctu 

. » ork 

libr< 

oath 



>f April* 



ie 

B : loan 



iguip«en t 



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fublic ' s. 



Park natural ilid* 

ho lain . r ;.tri ! in the 

lark room. In t. . ,o this, > .on 

In t . which WOT . , :ok 

■lash picture* o ' the r t , ' : , 

jhe evening of April 7 at arewell Lone] 

I res wore provided to the Park in 

•iratlnf an article about these emplcyeea. 



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One hundred ar.d fifty ft lu onl were . • 

A set of 25 kodae 1 ' . Frank C. an of 

J ,on on April 3 
ellowstone* Ho was also supplied with sevc 
ok which he is writin. . 






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'uoph.to prints were made o to 

iloaeffiite .1 *ark for their ur<r 

a cajnffira dl . 

A kodeeXl<ta -' e v&a m i« . r use as 

lcrec illustration la an article which she is ae." 

TV. : 1 rlflta of eneral Telle 

• Kletb Cbapouui vhe is tal . &ett to JFcrtu te&da to: ;«ra 

menbera in • *e at the Inia ice* 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park June 8, 1956 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly Report for May, 1956 

Special Activities and Conferences 

The Chief Park Naturalist attended the regular staffs meetings of the 
superintendents staff which were held on May 3 and May 17 in the Conference Room, 

The Chief Park Naturalist devoted several days time during the month to 
work on the preparation of materials for use in the final submission of the MISSION 
66 Prospectus, A special meeting on MISSION 66 was attended in the Conference Room 
on May 7» 

Mr, Harry Robinson, Chief Park Naturalist of Glacier National Park visited 
Yellowstone on the evening of Kay 3 and at that time conferred with the Chief Park 
Naturalist and the Museum Specialists, 

On May 21 and 25 several hours were devoted to a conference with Park 
Naturalists • David Beal, John Tyers, and Condon participating and at that time plans 
were completed for tne personnel and station assignments aad the interpretive pro- 
gram for the 1956 season. 

Dr. Paul A. Zahl of the National Geographic Magazine was given help by 
■embers of the interpretive staff in preparing materials and pictures for the article 
is preparing for the National Geographic Magazine, 

?ligious Services and Chapel U se 

The regular church services were conducted by the Rev, liuane Murphy in 
le Yellowstone National Park Chapel at 10:00 a.m. each Sunday. A special Mother's 
service was held on Kay 13. The service of May 20 was attended by a large number 
>f people from Livingston, Montana on the courtesy tour and on Kay 27, a special 
jdi cation service was held for the communion service given in memory of Mrs. Kay 
Spence Hamilton and for the church service announcement board tiven in memory of 
Margaret L. and Everett L. Arnold. The service of the 2?th. was also a communion 
service. In attendance at the service were people from the combined communities 
l)f Gardiner and Mammoth, Following the service there was a general meeting oi the 
teople interested in religious services from the two communities to go over the 
annual program of the Gardiner-Mammoth winter ministry. The resident minister pre- 
sented his report on activities and the financial report of the organization was pre- 
lented by the treasurer. This meeting was followed by a coffee hour. It was the 
.ast meeting of the Gardiner-Mammoth winter ministry program and beginning June 3 
»he summer student ministry program will begin. 

The last regular Sunday School meeting was held at 11:00 a.m. on May 20. 

On Monday evening, Kay 28, a special meeting of the summer ministry cora- 
ittee was held in the conference room of the barracks building. At that time the 
ommittee set up a budget and operations plan for the 1956 summer season Protestant 
eligious program. 






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On the evening of Ray 28 a meeting was held for the election of trie 
Sunday School officers for the l?i> ~5>7 winter season* At thia meetine the following 
officers were elected! Nr« Frank Kattson, President* rs. Margaret Carry, Vice 
Preaidentj Pre. l arie Pierson, Secretary) :re. £nylu hurray, treasurer) and To. 
Alice iuist, ileine Hamilton, and Rolla Everett Board Pembera* 



r uring the month of Fay final arrangements were made for the ly 
religious service program Tor all church denominations* The program will include 
rvces by the Roman Catholics, Latter-ray Saints, Seven-' ay Adventists, and the 
Protestant services of Vie summer student ministry program* 

In-Service Training 



The Interpretive 'Iviaion continued to raimeofcrajtfi and distribute the 
:e Hows tone Weekly News* 



Park Naturalists • Beal, Tyers, and Condon attended portions of the Protective 
ivision Training Conference which was hold Key lh through the 2£th. Park Naturalist 
leal projected the training movies at this conference on Haj 15 and Park Naturalist 
*yers projected pictures on ^ay 15 and 21. he also projected the : 66 Program 
is part of this tr&ininr session. 

Park Katuralist Beal devoted considerable time during the month of hay 
io ortentational training with Park Naturalist Tyers* The Chief lark List 
levoted some tlsie to this work* 

Tsonnol 



Clerk-Stenographer Shirley Van Gilder was on duty all isonth. Park Haturallst 
eal was on duty all month* Chief Park Maturelist Condon was on duty all month* Park 
aturalist John Tyers transferred from r inosaur National Monument to yellowstone, 
rriving here Hay h and entering on duty May 6« rajrti aturalist Tyers was on duty the 
•lance of the month wit * the exception of annual leave taken Kay llw 

Park Naturalist errill P* Beal was promoted from the position of lark :s&t- 
ralist GS-7 to Park Katuralist CS-9 effective Kay . 

On Kay 27 the tours of duty for Park Bator allots* Heal and Tyers were Chan 
or the sumner season* Park Naturalist Beal*s lieu days will be Friday and Saturday 
i Tyers will be Sunday and Monday* 

^A Ion*; distance call was received from Howard B. klin on Kaj lb at 
lch time Information was iven him of Theo< ore oeder, a former Yellowstone seasonal 
rk ranger naturalist. f r. Koeder has fone t fl ;e leg* Parkway as a Park Hanger* 
Burial the month seasonal park ranker naturalists* Clyde Lussier; Kay J. * avisj 
ibd C>tis Robins resigned from their positions and it has been necessary to replace them 
ijith other men* 

Several employees entered on duty during the month* They are s follows: 
bsfie . *rior, *y tbj Ted rsJirfnsnn, a? t*j ieltei nrrlmm&g ij |1. 












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Interpretive Servi ces 

Tho interpretive services rendered by the division durinr the month in- 
cluded the presentation of cone talks at Old Faithful follow i I opening of the 
museum on May 2lt and the presentation of a number of programs both within and with- 
out the park by permanent personnel. 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon presented the following programs during the 
monthi May 1 - Rural schools at Pine Creek - 150 persons attendee, Tho 

talk was "Your Yellowstone". This same day the Chief Park Nat- 
uralist presented a program at Clyde Park to the rural schools, 
on the same subject with 160 persons in attendance. 
May 2 • A program was presented to the r^ral schools at Springdale, 

Mont aria with 36 persons attending* 
May 8 - A program was prerented at Cooke, \ontana to 37 people. 
Kay 11- A program was given at Pray, Montana to 6t people. 

Park Naturalist 1 avid 3eal presented a program to the Kiwanis Club of 
Billings, Montana on May 16 with 120 zaen in attendence. 

On Kay 20 Park Naturalist Condon conducted the Livingston, Montana courtesy 
caravan from Mammoth to Old Faithful. There were hi cars in the caravan and soma 
200 people in attendance. This caravan trip took the better part of the day and tne 
party visited the Historical site at on Junction, the Lower Geyser Basin, Bis- 
cuit Basin, and tne tfpper Geyser Basin. Several goyoora were observed in eruption and 
other phenomena of interest was observed. 

On May 22 Park Naturalist Condon took Colonel John Vincent, irector of the 
Wildlife Conservation, National Park Came and Fish Preservation of Natal, South Africa 
on a trip to the Geyser Basins and to the Grand Canyon area. 

On May 22 Park Naturalist ' ave Beal took a motor caravan from mammoth to the 
Geyser Basins and the Grand Canyon. The part/ consisted of 60 geology students from 
Rocky Mountain College in Billings, ontana. Dr. Buck was in charge of the party and 
this trip took the entire day. 

The 16mra motion picture, "Geyser land in Winter," was loaneti tc ov. iill 
of the Central Christian Church in Billings, '.ontana and it was shown to that con- 
gregation on the 25th. with 50 people in attendance. 

Museum Activities aid Exhibits 



Specialists Floyd Lafayette and obert Barrel were at the headquarters 
aueeura working on the museum exhibits layouts for tae Canyon Museum from f-'ay 1 to 
May 23. These men devoted a groat deal of energy to the project and worked late 
evenings and on weekends. Members of tne interpretive division staff devoted a lot 
of their time to assisting these museum specialists and in re-viewing work >'one by 
them and in discussions of approaches to the preparation of the exhibits for tho 
Canyon Museum. The exhibit plans were completed and turned over to Yellowstone by 
the specialists on May 23. These were transmitted to the Museum Branch in Waa&ington, 
P. C. for review and comments on Ma 25. 









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The Museum Specialists were taken on a guiied trip to the (/rand Canyon area 
• May it by Park Naturalist Condon. 

The Mammoth Museum was open all montn and as estimated 10" ople visited 
.t. The Old Faithful Museum op: e. The balance of the musuems 

rill be opened early in June. 

uring the winter trees had .fallen on the Fishing Brings and Norris Museums 
rith no damage done to the Morris tfuseum but some damage done to the Fishing bridge 
lueeum. 

The aovors were removed from the Mooi-c exhibit, the Obsiaian Cllti exhibit, 
±6 Firehole exhibit, an- the Foyer exhibits at Morris on May 17* The shutters were 
removed at ArtiitJs Point on May a ann these have been used by park visitors Lince 
ihat date. On May 18 the stagecoaches were uncover d on the Museum porch. 

On May 10 and 11 Park Naturalist's Beal and Tyers worked on the installation 
>f the overhead li ; bttia| in the exhibit room of the Cld Faithful Huseum and on that 
late removed all the braces from the museum and the court, '•'•mi flood lights were 
Placed in the exhibit room at the Old Faithful Huseum on flay 29. 

Park Naturalists' Beal and Tyers worked on museum accession records and 
lusaam access oned materials on May 3 arid 9. 



The self-guiding trail introductry signs vcre refinished by Bill Olson of 
-he Paint Shop and they present a very fine appearance. ? ; ew BigBS were obtained for 
-he terraces and these were made by Bill Mardis at the Carpenter Shoj. , painted by 
till Olson and placed on bases by Road Foreman SftafeMtt* These were placed on the 
-•rraces at key points where they were needed at the end of the month. 

esearch and Observation 



On Kay U Park Naturalist Condon counted 21 dead bison between the Fishing 
fridge and the Lake Butte Koad along the east shoie tt trie Lake. Greatest con- 
centration of dead animals was in the Mary Bay area. On this same date a large flock 
f Eared Grebe were observed on the Yellowstone Elver near Fishing Bridge. The 
sprey are busy nesting, on the pinnacles in the Canyon. 

On May 9 a trij was made to uld Faithful and to the Hud Volcano area with 
ark Engineer Carry Kowe. At this time decisions were made concerning; the installation 
nd rebuilding of walks at Morris Career Basin, on the Mammoth Hot Spring Terraces, 
t the Black Cragone Caldron area at the mud volcano and on QmjBm Hill. 

t« ntfLmrimt histories! materials for use in "c ' it was dis- 

overed thft Liram K. Chittenden, 3n the original ed tion of the book, "iellowstone 
ational Park," published in 1895 used illustrations of drawings which were supposed 
o be the original sketches made by Private Foore of the Lower and 0j ^lls made 
hen the Vashbira, Langford, ?oane Party visited Yellowstone in 1870. An examination 
f the book, The I is cover f of Yellowstone National Park," by N. P. Langford which 
i published irst in 1%' illustrations which we/ osedly coj ies of the 
riginal sketches or these two water falls made by tfoore. 


















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*hose in Lan; ford's book vers entirely different pictures to those used by Chittenden. 
fhis raised the question a r to which of these supposedly authentic reproductions 
really represented the original drawings, urther study is being made to determine 
Just which are the originals*, h general examination 01 the two sets of sk'jtcnee 
Leads us to believe that in all probability the ones in Chittenden's book are the 
iuthentic reproductions of the ordinal sketches made* 

On May 22 six young £OBlinys were observed on the Madison 'iver near 
-iadison ^section. I 'a' drill Grant was observed on her neet several tiT<es during 
the month near Nyeph Lake and at the months close 8 e Wc.8 stxll incubating her egge* 
Several families of geeee have successfully hatched otft between Mammoth anc Jorris 
aut it is thought that many of the nests were lost because of hi t h waters* Streams 
Df the park ap> ear to be the highest they h ve been for many years and although data 
at the present time is not available from strcc records, the water at the 
aeedows at '-orris Junction and at Madison Junction is the highest that I have ob- 
served in the years that I hc.ve been here* 

On Hay 22 the Osj fej nesting below Inspirat i on I cint were watched for some 
tine and the male bird brou ht a fish to the female on the nest which she ate immediately, 
ifter eating it she left the "ist on a flight sad left the male in charge of incubating 
the Sfl s for awhile* Durin; this exchange it was eae SEible to 3ee three c 
In the nest. It will be interacting to ooserve what success these birds have in 
Lneibating this number of eggs* 

On Kay 25 F&rk Naturalists' Tyers and Condon made a trip to Canyon, Fishing 
h"io>e, down the South Entrance read sad back to Ma«smoth via Old Faithful. On this 
lay ice was going down the river backing up against Fishin and some interesting 
pictures were made of attempts to blast the ice as a means of protection for the 
Bridge. At the time of our arrival at the Lake area that portion of the Lake which 
:ould be seen from Fishin « and the outlet was covered with ice and a out three 
tours later the ice was entirely gone from the Lake* A visit was made to the snow 
blows on the South approach read and a great deal of flooding was taking place along 
ihe road due to the rapid melting of the snow. Observations of the mania '"'attar 
from melting shows indicated tnat the Continental ivide sign on the south approach 
foac should be placed about 2 1/10 die further south if it is to reflect that point 
rhere the drainage flows into Yellowstone Lake and towarc Lewis *ke and the Snake 
fiver. Siroiliar observations of the running water between toest Thumb and Old Faithful 
Indicated that the Continental Divide, sign which is nearest to Vest Thumb should be 
roved 1 6/10 mile further west if it is to reflect the divide between drainages* 

A pair of Bald Eagles were observed by Beal and Tyers near the Natural Bridge 
jioed on May 29* Park Naturalist Tyers observed nine cow moose and two calf moose 
>etween Soda Butte and the Northeast Entrance on May 30 and Park Naturalist Condon 
bserved two bulls and five cows on ay 31 in Willow Fark. 

Abrary 



The Yellowstone Fark Research Ederar* was used a great deal during the 
onth in gathering aatei >ia« in the exhibit plans for the Canyon Museum* 

Ooks were loaned to a no*biix of individuals and the following is a general count 
n the use of the Library* 






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Books received 12 

Magazines 17 

Fafcphlets 13 

Books in Circulation 53 

Books on Indefinite Loan 125 

Natural History Association 

On May 18 Fr. I.orin F. Wheelwright of the WheelVgight Publishing Co. of 
Salt Lake City was i*: Lne Chief Park Naturalist's ot ioe and at that time negotiations 
were instigated for the reprinting in revised form of r. 8am deal's book, "Story 
of fcan in Yellowstone." The possibility of printing the book on "Plants of Yellow- 
stone, ■ were discussed. Between Kay 18 and Fay 27 Park ffaturallst Condon and Beal 
assembled materials consisting of tne negatives, slides, pictures, and other items 
necessary to get these publications under way. On Kay 27 Park Naturalist Condon 
went to Salt Lake City and ipant the da-s of Kay 28, 29 and part of the 31st. con- 
ferring and negotiating with the Wheelwright Publishing Co. Before leaving Salt 
Lake City, a contract was made w:'th them for printing 5000 copies of the "STory 
of Man In Yellowstone". This is to be published at a cost of 6,000.00 pics some 
i .cidental expenses. After a greet deal of time and energy had baas spent on the 
proposed Plants book, a bid of £'12,750.00 was received for the publication of 7500 
copies of the plant book. It Mould contain 20 colored pares consisting of 65 plant 
pictures and 20 black and white pages consisting of 70 black and white pictures and 
3 pages of line drawings. The plants book would be between 200 tad 220 pages in size. 

b contract was entered into for the publication of this book but the matter was to 
reviewed by the Board of rirectors cf the Library and Museum Association ana the 

r inter s were to be advised after June 1. 

Final proof of the book, "Bannock Indian Trails in Yellowstone" by Wayne 
plogle was sent to the Smith Brooks Publishing Ce« in Lenver the 21st. ano at the 
nonths close none of these hove been received. Final proofs were also cent to the 
Sdwards Brothers on the ""tor of Old Faithful Geyser" and at the months close none 
>f these had been received. 

The Association has acquired its book stock for summer sales from the 
arious publishing houses and large stocks have been received from Bouthton-Kifflin, 
University of New Mexico Fress, and Maynes Inc. 

Mrs. Alice Qulst worked through the month as clerk for the Association and 
he prepared new record forws s been keeping the books of boa Association in 
eping with the new plan of operations. 

The book stocks for summer sales were taken to Old Faithful Museum on May 2\\ 
id to Fishing Bridge Museum on Hay 31. 

tip>aent and Supplies 

Purohaae requiaitic is listed in order of priority for equipment neeaed by 
division were sup; lied to the headquarters office on Kay 31. 

The janitor supplies for all of the museums were purchased from the store- 
>use on May Jkg paafraf»4 and some of them distributed to field stations. 



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Park Naturalist Tyers spent several days during the month petting the 
seasonal quarters ready for the seasonal personnel. H© also placed metal property 
tafS on museum exhibit cases* 

Photographic aiv'- Visual Aids 



Twenty-four Ux£ negatives were exposed tfurlnf onth and processed. 
I 150 go.... takes with kodachrorae l \ ?ed hack. 

Five 8x10 glees? prints were Mat to 1 . artin» Sditor of the I ark 

County News on Hay 21 for his use in Yellowstone articles in that paper. 

ihotc ; ..rarh& were taken of the eld .raftmn fire Truck by lave deal since 
thot piece of equips&ent was to be sol.: and disposed of. 

There was 2O0ft. cf kodachrome movie film and rolls of K135 iilra exposed on 
field subjects during the month, 4 

Thirteen kodasliueo eeve on loan tc 1 . aul A. &ahl for review by the 
National Geographic Megasine to see whether they would be suitable for use in t 
■agazine. 



Derid de L. Condon 
Chief Park 'Naturalist 



C ondon .^ 
file "^ 

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Supcr.intc , ilowetone E~t^enal Part 

Chief Park ftatui&list 

Monthly Report tor June, 1956 
k g&Bt el . tcilfltiea ^ 



Park ^turallut John i>ers - evoted sever* j tine the .-.with to 

sead^'ini quarters for occupancy by seasonal perse in pre] 

rf property for si ever to these people* 

•ief Jerk letarelist t Bennett 

lale of the I&rector's office and rer* 

mrk at Old Faithful and i time went over wi ' ^olatinp to re» 

Miarch and interpretive developraeiita in Telle, stoae. 

r« Jack O'Brien, feature writer for --«w« • Lne was in ief 

ark naturalist* ? c on June 11 m\6 at that time 

*rning Yellowstone vities, r ven him 

'or use in pre p ar ing an article 1 jwstfeek I . 

The Chief Park Katnreliet attend* p staff meeting wh 

yeld in the conference roow on June 1?. 

June 20 fir. Victor Sandbar g a ad . _>o», re ivec oi 

he U. S, Forest Service were in the Chief Fa I r s ci ce and made in 

encerning where the? cox. 'ain blacik bear cub pictures. 

o stop back in agai: report their success but , , 5pre- 

eait&tive of t «ty was in the Chief r a 

onfereuce on June £1. , hr vas w n interesi 

raa as it is operstAd In v *llovstone. 

. arst. Freelance 

list's office on June 21 and the 26th and on v.. s was <given cens-i ^eratoe 

ijae. Inform to hia ming 

erms might be round. 

. r.drev if. rant, i presentative of 
as in on June 2 several hours ti«e were 

or his activities stone this summer. Vie v 

retive a* so t plan to visit the v -s at the 

enters of interest. 

Fahnstock of the . . --vice, iaseula, Montana and 

onmr district rsn>er at Oardir , art vieSt on 22. 

ic 23 Chief of Infoiwaticai Kr. Herbert arisen, his ass . Jane.' nans 

ad Mies Jean Srieser were in the Chief lark Naturalist's of rice and at that time 
Is cussed the ;;elr which the interpretive divis ve to : ieser 

assignment bt*re. the balance of the montr eser vas 

derable assistance s division. 





















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On June 2> Park Naturalists Condon and David Beal attended the giound 
jreaking ceremonies at Canyon Village site and obtained a number of pictures of the 
LCtivities which were conducted there. 

On the afternoon of June 25, Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a 
inference which was held in the conference room in the Barracks Building with Director 
irth, Regional Director Baker, Chief of Western Office Design and Construction Hill, 
uperintendent Kogers and members of his park staff, 

eligious Services and Chapel Use 



On June 7 correspondence was prepared and sent to the Latter Day Saint 
issionaries and Roman Catholic Priests, Complimentary permits for entry into the 
ark and also complimentary cards for use in obtaining lodgings at Yellowstone fark 
ompany lodges were also sent to them. 

The religious services program was printed again this year by Joe Bill of 
he Yellowstone Park Co, and made available to us on June 8. Copies of these service 
nnouncements were posted throughout the park on bulletin boards and in places where 
eople concentrate. A copy of these services is attached to this report. On June 18 
ircular No. 7 giTljtg detailed information on the religious services program for 
ellowstone and on services available in adjacent communities was prepared and issued 
o all field stations, personnel, and information desks for both the Yellowstone Park 
3. and the National Park Service* Copies of this program are attached fee this report, 
le religious services as conducted during June conform to the program as outlined 
i the scheduled church services and in the circular on church services. £11 of the 
srvices conducted by the various religious denominations have been well attended and 
i is thought that the program is the most successful one so far. 

On June 19, arrangements were made for the Latter Day Saints and the Protestant 
) use the Canyon Banger Station's community room for religious services on those days . 
len the weather is bad and it is not possible to hold the services in the outdoor 
hitheater, 

.-Service Training 



The interpretive division continued to mimeograph and distribute tne 
[llowstone T-'eekly Mews and at the close of June there is 6Q0 copies of this newsletter 
fing distributed. 

On June 5 Chief Park Hanger Otto Brown and ohief Park Naturalist Condon 
mpleted details for the In-Service Training Program which was to be given seasonal 
rsonnel. 

The In-Service Training Program for seasonal park rangers and park ranker 
mturalists was held on June 12, 13, Hi, and 15. Copies of the training program as 
fjesented are attached to this report. Those trainees participating in the program 
IJom the interpretive division were: Don Larson, George Hahn, Elmer Andersen, Burton 
Iderson, William Phillips, Dennis Brown, George downing, and William Saul. There 

re also 29 seasonal rangers participating. Park Naturalists Tyers, Jeal, and Condon 
fayed important roles in the presentation of the training to the seasonal personnel. 






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Oo June 21 | special tralnin,/ session was hel 
Ln the Kaawioth Kusetai ssadi 

T/u: la h« nsonth 8 :flei«©randu»s of instruction, 
faoridnt in trie interurntive division have been prepared 
lag subject*: 

1. Unifora -tions 

2. r»ts for rersonnea 

io vhicn require Inter. *rvicea 
h* A Statement on the Fossil Flora by . . arf 
5* A a tailed Interpretive raa foa . 

motion on the Preparations . .tea 

7* Outline on Ir.terpretive .etsarks to be aade at Gamp fire 1 
8, Tories w ;Ssion at Evening Qaa$ raws and 3u* 
titles of talks, 

on presented toe fe raos to Jeilew. 

ark Company employees* 

June 7 - ho *»us drivers and also other «. J Ley 

in the Maoaota Canteen* 
June 20 - Concessioner eaployeea at smooth 

Recreation Hall, -istrict r Badol. in perticipat< 

in this program* 
Ju;^e 22 - Concessioners employees at nation 

.-■ people. .-.triet I Lbert . la 

program* 
June 29 - Canyon iiotel amployeoa .est* « 

, . ..30 pool La), 

On June 18 Chief fork Batarelist Condon spent some • uin 
anger Stevens and Assistant Chief iaa per use of lean 

rejector equipment so that they could use it in tne tr. Slister- 

ust e-floyaoa* 

On June 23 the tape raoardiAg and siloes presents 
- rips" was run o . . 

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abere o£ the perwanont Naturalist iv 
ore. and Van wilder vera on duty all aoatr:. 
time slips* tours oi doty, and other material* of tale h, 

I | , ;rris, and Kadiaoa Junction* lark ralist iJe*l handled sJLml 
for Old Faithful, West rhumb, Fishing Bridge, and Canyon* Park Netui 
*a prepared the Uniform Voucher elaima for all persoaoaa da i\& and 
aade up tr&val requisition* for Stewart and 6tevons to use personal c«ue. 






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Park iianger NatursJJlst Tec J, Parkinson was on annual leave June ( . easonal 
oreonnel on duty at the berlnnin^: cf June werei . • ;arlerj 

ed J. Parkinson, The fo 11 c personnel entered on .vc±n& June: 

Lowell . 756 

B. Ja; : • -tier 6/3/56 

Ceorp.e L # owning /56 

kin* . me 

Klaer Andersen /'./; 

. ciraon 6/ 

Herbert X. lystrup 
Burton . derson 

is J. it-own 
Samel M. deal 

Villliam L. Baker .</ 

Arthur Kash 
Vallacs I . :ood 
Ceor^e . ihn 

Wayne ". plofcle 1/56 

ViUia.ii 1. Saul 
Joseph . 

tfeu Revell Phillips 

Williaw T. rWscoll /I' 

Raywon? ?. Hec 

Clarence C, «llft«an &A3/5& 

fttley . -rielland 
George . verdrup 

lonalc . tewart 6/3 

Joseph F. •: etraull 
Frank . i Bid 

chard ■ . roeder 
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Simon an j/£6 

ebert J. Jonas 6/20/ 

Kerrold Assnussen 

In addition to the toiegolng per** r •> 

orsi Richard p, ' orrell (6/1/^6) *1 1? » ■"»> *- ; rt 

/56) at i'ishing Bridge) f<ary Bennett ( 6/I4/56) at Vaawiotiu 

The personnel were assigned to field stati 11 pro were u? 

lay by June 18* *lel! Station assi£roaente were shown 0. 2. 



nterpretive Ser^ces 

The self- > Lag nature trails were put ; on the follow 

atess June 6 - bis Caleb Trail, 1 ansnothj - reen raon Spring Trail 

errlsj June L8 • Losi Tr^il at <?v«?lt5 and June 18 » The 

ill at Cld faithful. 

On June lfl interpretive services were 3 swine in keeping with t 

.nterpretive prefrsn outline which accompanied m**--. m Ho, *> for all pa 

tmturallsts* Thi: program covers all of the activities which will be conducted by 
ersonnel in ths interpretive division tiuring the 1956 season* As part of this 









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rogram a special evening tali: is being given in the Eagles Hall in Gardiner, Montana 
nd for the month of June it has had an average attendance of $!•&% persons per 
ifcht. Park Naturalist John Tyers helped to get this program started on the first 
vening of its presentation in Gardiner, A copy of the 1956 interpretive program 
8 attached to thie report. 

Evening programs as part of the regular interpretive services have been 
■resented in the following concessioners buildings: Lake Lodge, Roosevelt Lodge, 
nd Old Faithful lodge. All fif these programs have been well attended with capacity 
rowds most evenings in each of these sheltered places. 

On June 2 Perk Naturalist Seal devoted the better part of the day to inter- 
retive work with hO Boy Scouts and about 10 adults at the Livingston let 
amporee held at the Indian Creek Campground, fie gave them special instruct: i 
crest fires, fire prevention and control. Chief Park naturalist Condon took 16 
xplorer scouts for a h hour trip through the Horr: -.sin and . . ug 
alked to the entire group of scouts around a cawplire. 

On June 6, a reel of I4OO 1 of l6mm colore; motion picture film was sent to 
r, John Cameron Swayze for use in presenting a TV program from Sew York on June 20, 

June 28 and 29, Chief Park Nat ur alls' it the better part of these 

wo days with the Montana Conservation Caravan Group consisting of 26 persens. Special 
alks were given to this group by Condon at cert; ' . stops in their travel around 
he park from the Wortneast Entrance, down the easi; side of the park to Lake, West 
hufeb, Old faithful and out the North Entrance, 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon presented tne following talks during June to 
pecial groups: 

June 17 - Bus Drivers and others (80 pre; ) 

June 12 - N,P,S, Trainees and cemmunit le (115 people) 

June 13 - ,?,S, Trainees and community people, 1 66 (6'» people) 

June III - Canyon Hotel (350 people) 

June 29 - "any on Hotel (U50 people) 

The interpretive services program whicl conducted st ._ Bid 
tations is receiving v r use by park visitors anr statistical data on thi£ 
s compiled in accumulative report No, 8a3, Form Mo. ID- « 

useum Activities and iixhibits 



The Mammoth and Old Faithful Museums wore opened all iiont . - .Ldge 
seum opened on June 1. The Madison Museum on June 3, and the Morris Museum 
..e 9. All of these units have been heavily attended by park visitors . pie 
em to be get 1 . i a great deal from their contacts with the exhibits. The T es$s 
fellowstone Information station has been operating by the Protection Division. 

The Fun,"i exhibit in the Mammoth Museum was re-done b e v Park Naturalists 
seal and Malt Her iman on June 2, 

The re alar maintenance and upkeep of the museums has been carried on during 
■he month with considerable time being devoted to the improvement of labels and other 
etails. Tnere has been installations of new bulbs in the exhibit cases, and other 






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necessary maintenance and operations work, New flood lights were placed in the 
light fixtures in the Old Faithful I useum and this improved the ability to see the 
exhibits and has improved the appreciation by the visitor. During the month a pipi 
guard rail was placed around the relief map and the geyser clock in the ( ith- 
ful r -useum. 

New orientaticnal trail map signs were placed at Liberty Cap and Cavern 
Jprings on the Mammoth Hot Spring Teraces on June 27 and at the months close new 
ligns of this type have been prepared for installation at the Norris Geyser Basin, 
these maps on the hot spring terraces have been receiving heavy use and seem to be 
/er^ helpful to the park visitor in determining where he wants to go and what he 
ii ants to see. 

The Canyon Visitor Center Museum exhibit plans were received back from 
ihe museum branch in t T ashinrton and a lengthy memorandum was prepared covering our 
Ibcg&hts with respect to the exhibits and exhibit floor plan. This set of plans 
rere sent to the Regional director's office for review and were recommended for 
ipproval by the superintendent, 

'esecjch and Observation 



On June 6 Ft. Henry S, Conard's collection of plants which was made in 
ftellowstone many \ears ago were received from Rr, Russell of Grinnell College. Park 
hanger Naturalist W. E. Saul has been working on the placement of this collection 
!|.n the Yellowstone Herbarium. 

Several reports were received about the -:i chard son's Grouse strutting 
n the Strutting, grounds near the switchbacks on the lunraven Pass road near Antelope 
reek. This courtin; dance apparently was most pronounced between June 1 and June 10, 
I n June 15 the trainees on the pre-season trainine trip had the opportunity of watching 
(0 male Harlequin ducks on the Yellowstone :ttver near the LeHardy Cascades, 

A young grizzly bear cub which apparently became lost from its mother re- 
tained in the vieinity of tne Mud Geysers for a period of more than 2 weeks, Jx, was 
first reported on June li by Lowell G. Biddulph and was rinally captured on June 2k 
pci sent to the San iiego Zoo, This bear proved to be a #&;Jor attraction along the 
padside and often had crowds of 100 people or more around it, Tt was rather unusual 
jn appearance in that it had a complete collar of while hairs around its neck, 

Badgers were observed during the month in the Blacktail Deer Plateau area 
ly both Park Mat era lists Tyers and Condon, 

Park Naturalist Beal, on June ? made a flight with Wyoming Fish and Game 
;ilot Charles N, Miller for the purpose of determining the status of concentration 
f nesting Canada geese alony the Yellowstone Hiver north of Yellowstone Lake and 
long Pelican Creek and in tne vicinity of Broad 'reek . -urn, Tern, and White 
.akes. Mr, Beal reports on this trip as follows: 

"We left the Cardiner airport at i?:30 a.m. and returned by 8:30 p.m. The 
sllowstone d.ver was the first area searched, and a total of ! ^e were sighted, 
jLl of these were found north of the Dragons Mouth, Mud Volcano area in Jiayden Vailey, 
lt»ne of these biros nad goslings with them or appeared to be nesting. The high water 
x the river had probably Destroyed -what nests haa been used. Turbid Lake was found 
i) harbor a large concentration of birds, but they were all considered adults accept 
Jkr seven goslings. The total count of geese on this body of water was over 155, 



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adult was not art to b* we lock band. it«d 

slices Creak aloa-; its lower portion and an 
^fer i ell can Creek. Kone of these birds apt e*. nesti.. f 

In the White Lake area 26 adults war- Been the 

al<e and 19 on the norl -tion. Seven adult;:. 

on Te e. >se were c action reek 

Sar these lakes, 

eapeter Swans was observ*: Lake, an 

o be nesting birds so ac close flying wee , *» 

as seen on Vhite T-ake, but t ese birds did n&, ting, 

A herd of li2 buffalo, mostly cows ar ran 

reek," 

On June 2? district Ranker Joe W«y a< 

joe Commission 3io"lo i^ts Who were in : . 

la crew captured and b* ^ese. i-v o: e r.tion or. he 

bat successful thr„t this crew of biologists have e Cure 

he, c a tared * --ver^l ducks, 

lag bands on then ek bands on them. 

'fiber lihh geese had la ad on I 

6? ■ ..ae geese ige neck bands placed on them, fist: c foe 

ty reports that no fatalities occurred in t ould 

bserve none of the hi* fared serious J 

1 urred.rainor injuries. t this banding -: 

' le movements of the eh eutsaer in Tela. le 

[ I obtain pome details 

ollec *.r«n1ta for specimens 

laued as follows: 

. rewn - Fossil slants I 
John fchetten - Fossil Mants arid ock 5pe< - June 13, 1 

Janes ' . ■:'■ i ] ' 

Tills J. u rown - r lower! n 
Serene '• evenjort • Entomological 8pe< 31, I 

erf - seks waA 'osails - June 16, 

')ort " . ssnlnf - ocks and Minerals - 
Bobby - , ; and Fossils - June 

John L, 'ook - r ;uils - Juc 

Thomas ♦ timber - scka and Fossils - 
Wallace J. Hwonessy - Insects end Tlants - Jim* 10, 1 

On June 3 i ark obert Sharp of the La lion c 

ported that a Fash a? e employee i served a wolvsr 

that station, iaion with , liver ( Lng thii t, ; 

learned that in r. Cope* a opinion the individual aeein 
not reliable and that on a number c p occ 

ual things which when Investigated proved tc sent 

r. BriJ stf of Pri iversitv atopred at the .bief iark Naturalist 1 

Tfice on June 16 and haa established his research party at Camp oooaevelt to • >ae 



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his studies 01 the fossil flora of Yellowstone. . 'lis party have been 
,tforkinc; the Mt. Everts - Lamar - and Specimen Ridge are . 

On June 16 Park Naturalist Condon visited the Trout Creek dump and at t 
time obsei-ved 20 different grisaly bear and on the. 26th he again visits dump 
and on tnis occasion saw 30 different grizzlies* This number consi&bed of the 
following » h lar^e males, 2 of these had their ears chewei and were badly 
carreri. There were 8 other* varied siaed and colore Lts. There was 1 female 
Jri. + b 3 yearling cubs and 2 females with 3 yearling cubs each. There were 2 females 
fith 3 this years cubs eaca and 2 females with 2 this years cubs each. Undoubtedly 
f additional time had been spent at the dump other bears \ ave been seen, 

11 of the bears reported were seen in broad daylight and on neithe sion was 
ihe dump visited after dark. 

On the 2oth while at Trout Creek dump there were ^ Sea C alls observed wiiich 
iad leg bands on and apparently had been banded previous years at the Molly Island. 

_-. Paul nichards and. Mr. George Surrley e • Oeolggical Survey 
ere in Yellowstone on the 19th and 20tn of June for the purpose of studying sedi- 
lentary rocks in the Gallatin Mountain area and at Meridian Peak near the Nortneast 
Entrance. They expect to return later tnis season to make -3. 

abrary 



Mrs. Lucile Warner has served during the month as Librarian and is work 
m tne accessioning and cataloging of books in the libra: . She also is working, up 
-he clipping files and cross, incexing materials. 

During. June, field libraries were sent to Tower Fall, Canyon, Fishing 
riage, West Thumb, Old Faithful, Madison^ and Norris. 

The Yellowstone Park .uesearcn Library was usee a great deal during the 
oath by various groups of people and books were loaned out to a number of individuals, 
he following is a general account of the use of the library: 

Books received — - - - - — - - - _ - « 2ii 

Magazines - - — - — — - - — ------ --- -25 

Pamphlets ---------- — — - — «- - - -- —2lt 

Books in Circulation - • - « — _- 262 

Books on Indefinite Loan -~i2i> 

itural History Association 

Early in June the Association received irom Sdwards Brothers, Lithoprinters, 
Arbor, Michigan 10,000 copies of the ■ .tory or Old ithful UeyserB The ship- 
nt arrived in poor condition-iand 1U0 copies of the book appeared to be damaged 
such a way that they were not saleable. 

A new sales display case for the Association sales publications was placed 
n the Madison Museum on June 2o. 

The Executive Secretary of the Association altered into a contract with 
Wheelwright Lithoprinters of Salt Lake City for the printing of 7500 copies 
•If the book, "Plants of Yellowstone, 1 ' by McDougall and 3ag;:iey. A great deal of 
l>rk has been put in the review of the manuscript, tne submission of it to the 

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leelwright Lithoprinters and on the examination of some of the galley proof • The 
lant publication is being delayed because we are not able to devote time to the 
reparation of pictures for use in illustrating it. Progress, howeiver, is being 
ade on the book and it is hoped that copies may be available before the seasons end 
was determined desirable to have 2500 copies of the book bound with cloth and the 
alance with a paper cover. Publication of this book is going to cost the association 
etween $13,000 and $1^,000. 

The galley proof of the "Story of Man In Yellowstone," by Dr. M, D. Beal 
as sent to us by the Wheelwright Lithoprinters in mid-June, corrections have been 
ade to the galley proof and it has been returned to the printers and we expect that 
y mid-July this publication will be available for sale at information desks. 

The Association sent 9 copies of the publications which we sell to the 
Lvision of Surveys and Field Service-George Peabody College for Teachers to be 
Laced on their list of low cost publications. These are publications which they 
scomrerdas items for highschools and grade schools to have in their libraries. It 

thought that by having this publication listed that the Association might bring 
aout a further distribution of literature on Yellowstone© 

The Association employed Lucile Wagner, Salt Lake City, Utah as Librarian 
id she arrived in Yellowstone on June 8 and entered on duty the morning of June 11. 
rs. Wagner is housed in the Apartment House in Apt. L. Mrs. Alice Quist continued 
r employment as clerk of the Association and has devoted considerable time to the 
:>okkeeping, sales publications issues to field stations, snd other routine work 
3S0ciat#Vwith book sales operations. 

The Association provided the material and supplies for the issue of the 
arch-April issue of Yellowstone Mature Motes . These were multilithed on June 21 
id 22 and UU8 copies were sent out in the mail on the 26th. 

The Association purchased for use in research work in the park, several 
iximum recording thermometers made by the Taylor Instrument Co„ These were issued 
b field personnel for use in making observations of the temperatures of thermal 
atures in the geyser basin areas. 

At the months clcse, we received from Smith Brooks Co. 5llli- copies of the 
>ok, "Yellows tones Bannock Indian Trails" by Wayne Replogle. These were acquired 

a cost of $23U0.58 to the Association and have been placed on sale at the museum 
iformation desks. Copies of the book were sent to the Library of Congress, Director 

the National Park Service and the Regional Director. Copies were also given by 
le Association to the author for his use in providing them to interested friends. 

The Association's public address units were used on June 25 at the ground 
making ceremonies at the Canyon Village. 

juipment and Supplies 



The public address units for use at the field stations were all installed 
'ly in the month and have been used successfully for the interpretive programs. 
I>me additional furniture was obtained for the seasonal quarters of seasonal employees, 
(ke of these items was a refrigerator for cabin No. 5 at Mammoth. A refrigerator 
ip given to us by Donald Larson for use by seasonal personnel and this was repaired 
ad is now in use by Clarence C. Alleman in Cabin No. U. 



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All audio visual aids equij ment including kcclaelide, movie projectors, 
ilic'e binaese fsr files were delivered to field stations by June 16 and have been 
in regular use in the interpretive program sinci that date. 

Final work was done on the small portable public address units* and 
^{Jthese were delivered to Tower Fall, Vest Thumb, Lake, . r on June 19. 



. 



A desk was obtained from the surplus su -1st on June 26 and this was 
placed in the bookroom for use by the Association clerk. 



.Zi rajphic and Visual Aids 



All ko<iaslide sets were sent to field stations m\& a large number of un- 
leund kodaslldss alone with binders were deliverer I at field stations 

lave been binding these slides as time permits* 

Three kodaslides were feiven tc ;'r. Theodore I :liiam Forest 

ark, Virginia, f <r. Tdth was pleased to get these slides and will use them in a 
uj ipecial program which is being presented regularly tc the public at Prince VlUiam 
torest Ferk. 

On June 22 six 35mm kodaslides and three IpsS colored.. transparencies were 
,a|wnt to the -ewsWeek ? agasine in hopes that one of them mi ; ;ht satisfactorily serve 
a colored illustration to accompany an article %&ieh they anticipate publishing 
>n Yellows tone. 

Forty-® i ght kx5 black and white negatives were developed in the dark room 
iurlngi the month and eighty 8x10 enlargements were m&de. 

Kr, John Cameron Swsyse was provided with liOv* l£nm colored motion 
pictures for use in presenting a TV program on June 20. 

On June 8 several pictures were taken of San so that one could be 
obtained for use on the jacket of the book, n Th* in in &11ok stone" viich 

Ls being published by the Library/ and Museum association. On June 25 Fark liaturalists 
ondon and Seal made a considerable wmber of kodaslides, 16mm movees, and black 
Mid white pictures of the grand breaking ceremonies at . June 22 an attempt 
*as made to make black and white pictures from kodaslides of various plants in hopes 
that a set of black and white pictures could be obtained to illustrate the book, 
rflante cf felloes tone" fc ougall and Sagfley. Lute made from these negatives 
Kpparently can be made and during early July it is hoped that enough negative 
m made so that we can complete the illustrative materials for this publication. 



David de L. ©ondon 
Chief rark Waturalist 

Condon 
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Superintendent, ellowstone Rational Park August 11, 1 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly Report for Jul^, 1956 

Specia l Activities and Con f erences 

Mr. Howard Sta, ner, Assistant Chief of the MI! 66 staff was in the 
perk July h and £• Chief Park Baturalii t Con ion accompanied Mr. Sta,yner from Vest 
Thumb up the east side of the park visitin f ; those areas at Grant Bay, Bridge Bay, 
Fishing r I Li e, Lake, Hay den Valley, Canyon and Tower Fall that have 66 
programs planned. On July 5 the day was spent traveling from Mammoth to Old Faith- 
ful' 1 and visiting the West Entrance. 

Kiss "ildred Ericson, former park ran- rralist stopped in early in 
the month for a brief visit. 

On tne 11th the Chief Naturalist met Mr. Mattson and ethers at Canyon and 
the proposed site for a campground amphitheater was visited. 



Mr. Kuben Hart, former District Ranger in Yellowstone stopped in at the 
museum for a short visit on the 1,'th. Mr. Hart was enroute to become 
of Everglades National Park. 

I rs. Treva Burd from the classification section in the personnel office 
of n rector's Office in Washington, D. . Mas in on the lbth. . was taken 
| to the Northeast section of the park on the 19th$ to the Canyon-Lake area on the 
20th j and park Naturalist John Tyers took her to the airport at ' m the 21st. 

Mr. Greg Smith, editor of tne "I onj Idlife" magazine was in on J 
Il8 and 19. At that time he arranged with Chief Park Maturalist for an article on 
the "Yellowstone Grizzly" to be published in the October issue of the Wyomi 
2ine. :'r. Condon is to prepare the article b. ; :t 25. 

The Chief Park Naturalist attended the staff meeting on July 19 a 
rispecial meeting called on July 30. 

rini the month Naturalists Beal and Condon devoted time to ident. 
iphoto praphfl of ^ellowstone subjects for the National C lie Society. 

:■■] .: lo\;s Services and C hapel Use 

The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used for the regularily scheduled 
services each Sunday by the Iiatter Day Saints, Rosea Catholics, and the Protestant 
Btudent Ministry. No special services were held. 

The kev. Warren W. Ont, Director of a Student Ministry in the National 
5 arks visited 'ellowstone for the period of July 16 to 23. Mr. Ost spa .siderable 
:ime in the Chief Park Naturalist's Office on the 23rd. review**! th< local ro| ram 
)f the student minirtr . 



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In-Service Training 

Several of the seasonal park rancor naturalists attended the district 
fire training programs for thobe ran er aistr . which they are world 

The Yellowstone Weekly News was assembled and distributed by members of 
the iaturaiist sion. 

On July 13 at 9*00 p.m. a special in-service trainin; session was held 
for the naturalist personnel at Mammoth* This session used up 2 hours time and 
cleaned :: ti natters. 

v : list John Tyeri was ^iven training in Photographic and i arkroom 
techniques by Be&l and Condon on a r.nmber of occasions dur te month. 

Personnel 

Mi 1 , abort T truer entered on duty as a ptxk n t on July 6. 

This brought to 35 nan the total of all seasonal, naturalists. Five GS-5 and 30 
These men were on duty through J\~2 an carried throuj h with the planned program* 

All permanent personnel; Van Gil* i , ■ ■, leal and ; on duty 

all month. All employees vho were sche^ : I il;v to work Jul Ld so. 

Mr. £ldon Jenkins was employed on Jul,./ 3 to fail the job of janitor and 
replaced Gary Bennett t»ho has resigned. 

Interpretive Service s 



The division carried through with tae p Lanni d programed activities. 
Walks, talks, a. aims wo. wall atte dad, with increases in virtually 11 phases 
of public oss« Great crowds witnesses - pi on* of Old Faithful and were a captive 
audience for some basic information on the park. 

A new self- nature tra'.l was -maintained at numb and j.roved 
to be jopular with :an. - park visitors. 

Tt;o larse erientationel trail guide ■ were erected at Morris 
Basin by Rill Clson ad Naturalists T ers ai ih on J 1 . e is have 
proven very useful and a greater number ci* people ha southern section of 

the Morris 3asin than ev^r before. 

Several memoranda covering trail and Bign needs, to help improve interpretive 
services were prepared during the month and submitted to trie Superintendent. 

On July 21 Chief Fark Naturalist Conaon conducted the blind group on a 
guided trip from Vest Yellowstone to Old Faithful, Vest Thumb, Lake, Can on, -orris, 
and out the Worth Entrance. The party this , ear consisted of 36 persons, severe.! 
who could see or who had partial vision. Kr. Andrew H. Brown and Hiss Jean Speieer 
made pictures and notes on the activities of t 

Turin;- the month trips to Canyon and several conferences were held with 
V. attson concerning amphitheater sites and sizes ior the new Canyon area, 
t-e months close nothing concrete had been settled on. 









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Miss Jean Speiser was fiven assistance In her work by virtually all 
the members of the operating Naturali5t on. lib;. tens; 

and at times accompanied personnel on trips and to joints of interc 

The evening program at Gardiner has not been as successful as it was 
hoped it would be but attendance has avera ed U6#T persons with a maximum of 89 
and a minimum of 23 • 

The full program as scheduled for the tummer was not in effect at 
Thumb until July 6. Since that date all activities ori inall have 
carried thrcuj h. 

M use um Activities a a n»i E xhibits 

r. Carl P. Kussell v,as In '/ellowstone on July 22 and at that time went 
ever the planning for wayside exhibits and was given a - of reports on this 
subject which he took with him for reference purposes. 

The cut flower displays at the Nammoth and /is hi. 
been unusually attractive and have been complimented on a number of occasions by 
park visitors. 

During the month, study skins of the Western Sparrow hawk . le Eared 
Grebe have been added to the museum collections. 

The broken museum sign at Norris was repai ineering : ivision 

end on the 30th of July the flagpole at Hadisen Museum which has been down all season 
was put up by the Madison road crew. 

Dr. Wm. Saul during tee month mounted and put in the herbarium man 
the plants of the r. Henry S. Conard collection. 

Park Naturalists' tieal and Fteplo e .le have been workin, : on the assembltni 
of exhii.it materials for use in the Canyon Kuseum section. » lc le spent the days 
of July 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 taking pictures and obtaining sjecimens. Be« :ed 
all the 23rd. with him. 

Research and Qbrervat o n 

Trips wer made out the Northeast Entrance and up onto tl • tooth 
plateau on the 1st and 19th of the month, loose were more co onl* seen outside 
the park tnan the,, were inside. Two bulls and three cows wen etween the 
mouth of Soda Butte Creek and the Northeast Entrance, while on the same tri] 
bulls and seven cows and calves were seen from the Northeast Entrance to Beartooth 
Lake. 

On July 3 there was a | ood snowstorm which placed a white mantle over 
higher mountain ranges. The Tunraven rass - lount Vvashburn area had about 1 inch 
of fresh snow on the ■, round about 7»00 p.m. and park visitors had the experience 
of making snowballs in Jul . 



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3 'ellowstor.e Science Expedition rhool s 

students from I ii fornia under the guidance o ssey ai lerick 

B. Turner, termer park ran • er naturalists arrivec in the park on July 2. 

ollectir. fc ' permits were issued to Hennessey and Turner. Equipment was loaned 
to this party and they s] ent the balance of the month otu> k. Collect 

of pressed plants, mounted i , ] amphi iana turned 

in to the headquartera museum. The venture was considered to be successful. 

On July 5 a family of 6 weasels entertains:: a large number of people 
in the vicinity of the I 1 aithful v aseum, and amphitheater. Many ires 
were taken but it is doubtful if many of these proved to be any ood. The sub- 
jects were constantly on the move and althou h their antics vera entertaining 
their rapid movements made both still and movie photography ver 
This family la 1 a 1 >st number of weasels in one place that those watching 
them recall navin^ ever seen. 

Collectir nits were issued to the following during the month of 
July, 19>6» 

robert C. oott - United States Got - Water earn] 

A. L. ftelander - University of California - Insects. 
• Bautor - Israel Geolc . Surve - ccks. 

A five gallon carboy of water from the Porcelain Terrace was sent to 
ir. Tyler of the University of n isconsin on Jul lU. 

I r. Y. Bautor, Chief of the .-eolo Ic . Israeli was in on 

July 23 and at tntt time was given a representative set of rock specimens and a 
permit to collect some additional ones for the museum of geology in Israeli. 

Several visits were made during the month to the 1 rout Creek dump I r 
the purpose of observing the Grizzly Bear. On the evening of the 20th a total 
of U0 bear all grissllot wore in sigitt at one time. On the ever .e 2?th 
the following class'. t ion was obtained on the bears observed? 

7 females £ cubs each 1 
1 female 3 cub8 h 

1 female 3 yearlin s ii 

2 females 2 earlir 6 

3 Three year old 3 

8 Four year old bear or oloer 8 
2 Old males 2 
1 The runt (. izzly) 1 

Total Tr? 

Cn July 2ii tne Studor Construction Company in dig, ing tne sewer tren< 
in the fir, him- BridfO Campground unearthed the skeleton of an American Indian. 
The burial was about 18 inches below the ce in th sa . fine gravel of 
the area. The olg shovel used in dig in scattered the skeleton and any material 
associated with it throughout the ditch waste material and recovery was not 
of all the bones of too skeleton. No artifacts wi a found. Juried with I 
human was apparently one dog. The human skeleton was in a fair stats o* 
servation and all the bones easily located were s&lva ■ ed. Part of the skull 
see other bones of the do;: were recovered. The I -1 been treated 



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Slvacet ana are beins ac essioned i ^ed to the c llection of material on 
the Indians at tie headquarters museum, 

A great grej owl was observed on the Norris-Canyon ro d by 
ralist Tyers on July 5» 

Dr. Arthur Nash collected some excellent specimens c ow from 
drifts on the Beartooth Highway on July 2li. ose plants will be 

left at the headquarters museum. 

The hu/;:e mass of overhanging travertine on the front of /a Terrace 
brcke off on July 11 and b the months close the scar was ne& I d over tilth 

frest travertine. 

Lemonade Lake at Soaring Mountain dried uj 6 and has been dry 
throu hout the month. 

Library 



Mrs. Luoile Warner has served throu hout the month as librarian. Field 
libraries were out to all field stations. 

The ioliowin, is a g«n ral account of the iise of the library for the 
month of Julyi 

Books received - - - - --.«.«-••-«--• -ly 

Magazines ---------------- — - — -30 

Pamphlets -39 

Books in Circ 1 tion ---------------- 3I3 

Books on Indefinite Loan -------------- 211 

?l at'..:ral history As s oci ation 



A list of publi oat ions available through mall sales was made up and 2uo0 
copies raultillthed, 

Tht balanat of the booklet "Yellow, tone's Bannock Indian Trails" -/ere re- 
ceived from the Smith >3r oks Publishing Company on Jul. 3» 

The final galley proof on "The Stor tone" by 3eal 

vas sent to the Wheelwri • ht Lithoprinters on the 2nd arm the first finished co : 
of trie new edition of the book were received on Jul Laced on sale then, 

iThe balance of the i>000 copies or ered are expected earl, in August, 

tag July several bat cues of .alley proof for ths Hants of fellowst 
were received from the printers and manbe s of the Naturalist staif, rs. Wai 
and Marianne Condon devoted a goodly number of nanhours to the careful chockd 
3f the proof. At the months close about two-thirds of tne manuscript has been set 
ip and reviewed. 

Several days time for Park !< at or allots Ccndoa L were devotee* to 
>btainin; black and white pictures of plants, process inj the fila 
mlarrenents for ne in illustr;-tin, ; the slants book. Chief lark Naturalist 60 






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devoted considerable time to waking up • um-aies of pi -re an ants 
for tne illustrative plates. There wert. pictures sent to the pi I for 79 
black and white and 6£ colored illustrations. 

One speaker of tne Yellowstone Libraj\, « -seum A: ion public 
address unit #ii was stolen from t:ie Old Faithful sater on Jul 7. 
piece ci equipment has never been recovered. 

The Association added to its sales list the booklet, lowers of 
Yellowstone and crand Teton" by ichsra Snaw. 

booklet were sent to Wallace ood, :r. C« Max Ban , . i tson and r. 
Bay J. "avis who contributed colored slides for illustrating the booklet, Co 
were also given to other interested parties. 

Eq uipment e n d Pup]- lies 

The month of July brought to the at Lon its - on 

to equipment o any one . ec.r. Equipment received consisted ci the follov 

1 Revere Model 6fi8-35mm slide projector 
; 1 Spencer 35mm slide projector 
1 tell and Howell Model 303 "16 . < .tie so i ojector 
1 li x 5 speed; raphic 

or.roe 10-key Ad :in machine 
3 itiplex 1800 capacity slid* 'lie cabinets 
1 Kins E::alcta 35mm camera 

With the addition of this equipment. vision shou 
f If ill its a .dio-visual obli >.tions. 

The Yellovsto^e Library aiid Museum Asvsoci ..tion p ..-„ . 

slide binders for use in binding Icodaslidea 'or use in the int rams. 

The model 202C which was returned ' 11 well as 
does not work and was a> ain returned to them at tne months c 

Photographic and Vis ual Aids 

ring the month a large number of I es were 

made of plants and of the Canyon area. Tn all liij negatives were i i and 

processed. 200 8 x 10 enlargements were aede freo these negatives. 150 - > x5 
contact prints were made. 

The movie "Yellowstone" issued by the Ford Motor Company was loaned to 
:d Cave National Park and was used by them for train: rposes. It was shown 
to ii'3 people on July 9. 

Park Naturalists seal 81 rs eacu did rush jobs on pictures 
accident or news covera e during the month. 






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Fark Naturalists at the headquarters museum and at field stations 
devoted consider able time to the binding of f hundred 2x2 slides 
use in the interpretive evening illustrated talks. 



Respectively Submitted, 



t avid d-- . ondon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



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Superintendent, Jellowstone National Park September h f 1956 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly Report for August, 1956 
pecial Activities a nd Conferences 



Regional Chief of Interpretation H. Raymond Gregg was in the Chief Park 
aturalist's office and conferred with members of the staff on August 6 and 7. On 
ugust 6 Mr. Ed Alberts, Regional Naturalist was also in the office and participated 
n conferences held Kith Mr. Gregg* Mr. Alberts again visited the Chief Park Naturalist 
ffice on August 10 and at that time reviewed with members of the Naturalist staff 
is impressions of tne interpretive prorram. Both Kr. Greg, aid Mr. Alberts commented 
n the master of ceremonies of aspects of the evening interpretive program which they 
hou; ht could be improved by modifying it so that it was not so stereotyped* 

Mr, Andrew H. Brown of the National Geographic Magazine's stai was in 
he Chief Park Naturalist's office for conferences on August 6, 13, and 15. Mr, 
rown has been given considerable help by the headquarters staff as well as seas 
aturalists in the field* 

During the month of Au ust considerable correspondence has been answered 
hich has called for library reference work in order to be certain that data and 
nfcrmstion given out was accurate. 

On August 2 the Regional Office requested that the booklet, "Yellowstone's 
lannock Indian Trails" by Wayne F. Replo^le be removed from public sale and corrections 
lade in the text. On this date Chief Park Naturalist Condon made a trip around 
;he loop and conferred with Raymond re, and Ted Castro at the Old Faithful Inn 
joncerning this publication. A long memorandum concerning this publication was 
:rep&red and submitted to the Regional Director on August li. 

Dr. Ralph W. Chaney, professor of Paleobotany at the University of California 
fas in on August 7 and a trip was made with him and Dr. Erling Dorf to the Mary 
iountain area on Au- ust 11, 

On Au : ust 8 the Chief Park Naturalist accompanied Park Engineer Rowe, 
Park Landscape Architect Mattson, Assistant Superintendent Hamilton, Engineer 
Wilson and Superintendent Rogers to the Canyon Village area where a study was made 
pf possible locations for amphitheater sites. Tentative sites for two small amphi- 
fcneaters were agreed upon and it was determined thst an attempt should be made to 

et a large central amphitheater if possible. Some members of the party went over 
the trail alinement for the switchback trail which is to be constructed from the 
Canyon rim to the brink of the Lower Fall. 

On tne morning of Au ust 13 at about 9:30 a*n« r. Homer Springer, ground- 
sman for the National Fark Service died o' a heart attack in the Mammoth i-iuseum 
restroom. Rangers Jones, Garry, and Gnuse alon t with the Ooctor assisted in etting 
Mr. Springer out and enroute to the hospital*. Park Natu: ; list David Beal witnessed 



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an automobile accident on toe morning of August 13 and has this to say about his 
experience: "On Au/ust 13, at 9»Ij7 a.m. a car driven by Ernst Kassowitz left the 
highway about .U mile north of Silver Gate on the Mammoth-Norris road. I witnessed 
the accident and hurried to assist the injured man. A tourist was dispatched to 
et the ambulance and send Rangers to handle the traffic. I spent 2 hours at the 
scene of the accident, first caring for the injured man, then telping to , et him 
ap the embankment to the ambulance, and finally recovering articles of hi. onal 
property that were scattered about the area as the car rolled over and over. The 
Investigation of the accident was con 'acted by the Protection Division. 

Dr. Erling Dorf who has been making an intensive study of the fossil forests 
?f the park for the past 3 seasons stored his gear in the museum's laboratory stora. e 
urea on August 17 and left the i ark on the 19th, 

Mr. Stuart Jewell, photographer for the "Walt Disney's who was in Yellow- 
stone last winter makin, colored movies of the park in winter arrived here on Ai> ist 
7 and since that date has been making pictures of summertime activities. Mr. 
Jewell has been given assistance at the headquarters museum and in the field by 
laturalist personnel. 

Daring the month several das time for the Chief Park Naturalist has been 
fiven over to working up a detailed allotment of the manner in which the funds 
illoted to the Interpretive 'ivision will be expended during the 19.-7 Fiscal Year 
ind these estimates have been broken down into quarterly proportions. Mr. Donald 
Itarr, a forner park ranger-naturalist in Yellowstone who was employed at Mammoth 
uid Fishing Bridge stopped in to visit with friends on the 21st. Mr. Francis P. 
arquhar of San Francisco was in the Chief Fark Naturalist's office on August 
!7 and on that sane da used the library to . r some data concerning mountain 
iliabing. in the Teton area. 

Mr. John E. Doerr, Chief Naturalist of the National Park Service was met 
it the c-.l rade, Montana airport on the morning of the 23rd. by Chief Fark Naturalist 
Jondon. They entered the park via West 7ellowstone visiting the information station, 
adison and Old Faithful. Mr. Tcerr conferred with a number of the seasonal em- 
loyees. On August 2l Park Naturalist Tgers took !:r. Doerr and accompanied Frank 
attson to the Canyon Village area where a study was made of the amphitheater sites 
d on August 25 Tyers, Condon and Mr. Toerr visited tne proposed amphitheaters sites 
the Kanmoth area and in the afternoon Condon took Mr. oerr to Old Faithful for 
conference with Superinte dent Frank Oberhansley of Grand Teton National Park. 

On the 26th Mr. Doerr was taken to Old Faithful b lark Naturalist Condon 
for a conference with Park Naturalist Parker of Grand Teto onal Park and then 
r. oerr was taken to Bozeman, Montana by Park Naturalist 3eal. During his stay 
^ere Mr. Doerr conferred with the Superintendent and other members of the staff. 

On August 30 tie Chief Park Naturalist had an opportunity to /view the 
raining center proposal as submitted by the service Training Officer Frank Kowe 
fter examining the training proposal as submitted to the field, the matter was 
iscussed with Chief Ranger Otto M. 3rovn and Assistant Superintendent Hamilton 
nd at tnat time some sug; estions were made for inclusion in the mem., i i to the 
irector's Office. 









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fielU.io.us Services and Chan e l Use 



The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used for the regularly scheduled 
services during the month and for the special Roman Catholic services on Au;; ust l£. 
The student ministry of the park during the month presented portions of Handel's 
Kessiah for tie benefit of park visitors and park residents as follows t Lake Lo 
• Au ust 17$ Canyon Hotel Lounge - August 20j Yellowstone National Pari- Chapal - 
August 22 and in the Old Faithful Lodge Tie creation Hall on August 23. 

On August 11 Mrs. Inga Dunn > ave the sum oJ .00 for the parpose of 

establishing a memorial in the Yellowstone National Park Chapel in memory of her 
deceased husband, William A. Dunn. Mrs. Dunn has indicated that a Notional Park 
Ciiapel record book would be a suitable memorial to acquire \ ith this money. 

In«Service Training 



The Division has continued to assemble and distribute the Yellowstone 
ITeekl.y News. 



'ersonnel 



Chief Pa k Naturalist Conion was on duty all month. Fark Naturalist 
Jeal was on duty all month except for 6^ days sick leave taken between the period 
)f august Hi and August 23. Park Naturalist John A, Tyers was on duty all month 
and Clerk-Stenographer Shirley A. Van Gilder was also on dutv all month. At the 
ilose of the month an organization chart for the ivision was worked up in rough 
iraft form and will be compl- ted early in September. 

Mr. Donald C. Stewart, park ranger-naturalist at the Madison station in- 
IJured his left shoulder while vaulting over a guard rail in an attempt to apprenen 
f speeding automobile. Mr. Stewart was treated at the hospital and the proper 
iccident re} ort iorms were completed. Park Ranger- aturalist Thad Stevens was on 
i hrs. sick leave August 28. Park Naturalist Wa ne fteplo le was on the Surprise 
reek fire from Au; ust 7 through August 17. 

Mrs. Lucile B. Warner and Krs. Alice H. Quist worked during the month 
a employees of the Natural History Association. Mrs. T ucile Vagner terminated 
tier services on August 2$ and was taken to the train at West Yellowstone on At - , 
e6 by Park Naturalist Tyers. 



The termination sc edule 
tfcrked up on trie 13th and seasonal 
close of business are as follows: 

George M. Sverdrup 
Burton E. Anderson 
Alma £. Teuscher 
Simon Simonian 
Herbert T. Lystrup 
Ra,7mond T. Heckamen 
Wayne F. Replorle 
George L. uov.ning 



for personnel within the 
personnel who terminated 



Norris 

Fishing Brie? e 

Fishin 

Old Faithful 

Old Faithful 
Old Faithful 
Canyon 
Old Faithful 



seasonal staff was 
their services at the 



August 8 
Au> ust 18 
A.., ust -3 
Au ust 23 
Au ust 2ii 
ust 2k 
Au{ ust 2li 
A ust 27 






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Clarence C, ivlleman 


Mammoth 


Au. ust 28 


William L. Baker 


Old Faithful 


Au; ust 29 


Herrold Asmussen 


Fishing Bridge 


A ast 30 


Walter P. Herrlman 


Canyon 


Au ust 30 


Richard K. Schroeder 


Cld Faithful 


Au ust 31 


Lve Services 







In general the entire interpretive pro: ram as it was scheduled for the 
sunrier season was in effect throughout the month of August* It v&s necessary, 
wiowever, to curb the pro: ram at some of the stations and this decrease in activities 
book place at the following stations at the dates indicated! 

Norris - A a, ust 8 

Fishing Bride - Au/ ust If? 

Old Faithful - August 23 

Canyon - August 26 

Mammoth - August 26 

All of the interpretive activities durinj the month were well attended 
>y park visitors. The use of the Mammoth Hot Sprint ter: aces guided trips was 
►specially heavy and the individual springs on the terraces proved to be very pop- 
liar as a source of interest to the park visitor. The evening talk which was pre- 
lented in Gardiner during the month continued to operate satisfactorily and the 
ast talk was iven in the Bagle's Mall on August 30, The seasons average attendance 
or this talk proved to be $0,7 persons and it is our thought that ohe pre 
Ithough not outstanding in public reception has been a successful venture. 



The interpretive program was terminated in its entirety at Roosevelt 
edge and Tower Fall on Au./ust 29 and j.ark ranger-naturalist Thad Stevens was 
fcansferred to Old Faithful, 

The problen of the development of amphitheaters at Mammoth, Vest Thumb 
nd Canyon was aiscussed and reviewed during the month with several different 
fficials and groups* A lonr memorandum was prepared for the Regio al Office on 

t lh reopenin ; the issue of the amphitheater structures to be installed in 
he Canyon Village area. At the months close no conclusions were reached as to 
ust wh;t action will be taken on it. 

On August lli Chief Park Naturalist Condon "aided a special group of 9 
.rl scouts and their leaaers on a geoloj y hike to the fossil forest area on 
icimen Rid;e. Dr, Erling Corf of Frinceton niversity and ; r, Andr.w H, Brown 
the National Geographic Society accompanied the group. 

Park Naturalists 1 ileal, Tyers and Condon ail audited a number of • 
ograms which were being presented by park ranger-naturalists at the various field 
ataons, Condon audited programs at Tower Fall on the 9th, Mammoth the 8th, Canyon 
"ie 11th, Madison Junction the 19th and at Canyon on the 23rd, Park Naturalists ' 
!fcal and Tyers both presenter jro, rams at field areas during the month. Park 
Ifcturelist Tyers prese ted a talk at Roosevelt Lodge on Au ust 9 and et Canyon on the 
.1st, His subject was "A Trip through flnoaaur National : onument," 









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Fark 'aturalist Condon reviewed the National GeOj raphic article by Pr. 
Zahl and also the captions for the illustrations to be used in this article and 
prepared letters for the Superintendent on suggested changes and corrections. 

On Aurust 27 and 28 Park Naturalist Condon reviewed Jean Speiser's 
manuscript for the proposed new broadsides and at that time prepared convents 
for sut. ested changes. 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 



The cut flower display st Fishing Bridg •sum and especially at the 
oth Huse'im were very veil cared for and proved to be very popular with the 
park visitors and it was not until August 30 that these displays had to be dis- 
continued. 

Park Naturalist Wayne Replo^le during the summer has collected a large 
number of specimens which it is planned will be used in the Canyon Museum exhibits 
when they are prepared. As part of this collection ^--Naturalist Wm. R. Phillips 
obtained a very fine sample of shale from the Mr. Everts area during the month. 

All of the exhibit cases in the Fishing Bridj e Museum were fumigated 
iuring the month and the interior of the cases cleaned and property numbers attac hed 
;o the cases. 

Ptrk Ranger -I: aturalist Wm. E. Saul continued the mounting of the H. S. 
Jonard collection of pressed plants for the Yellowstone Herbarium. There are still 

considerable number of these plants which need to be mounted and placed in the 
lie folders. 

Park Naturalist Beal spent August 6 in the Can on area obtaining pictures 
I art tc be used in the Can. i seura Interpretive Exhibits* 

The roof of the courtyard at the Old Faithful Museum was repaired during 
\he month. The building and shake roof need painting b dly. 

ese^rch and Observation 



On a field trip made completely around the loop b" Park Naturalists Beal 
lad Condon on August h, a large number of pictures of flowers were taken and motion 
ictures and stills of rizzl.v bear and black bear were obtained. A concerted 
ttempt to obtain good photogrsj hs of a Fringed Gentian has not yet produced anything 
f an unusual character. 

A number of interesting Indian artifacts had been obtained during the 
jonth. Park Natu i list Condon found a portion of a spear point at Norris on August 
U on August 15 a good sized peice of a jasper knife was picked up at the sprj 
.a the Horseshoe near Little America and on August 20 about a dozen pieces including 
isveral good points were obtained on the Lake shore at the end of the southeast arm 
:3er foil,. Islands by park naturalist Condon and others. On Aurust 2U several worked 
JLeces and one small bird point were obtained at the sane site. On Aurust 29 two 






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es of obsidian which vere portions of artifacts were turned in at the West 
.ib Ranger Station by a Mr. Beaver and he has been written a letter making 
q try about the exact locality in which he found these. All of these nave been 
idded to the Yellowstone Park collections along with appropriate data on the 
ates found and locality w^ere they were obtained. 

On August 6 a long conference was held with Mr. Juel Langhofer concerning 
lace names to be riven to a number of features in the Shoshone, Lewis, eart 
■eke and lid Feithful areas. At that time Kr. Langhofer wai iven a copy of the 
- tlas for use in the Shoshone Geyser Basin area and also to obtain pi; ce names 
rom. A special memorandum on this subject was prepared for the suj i lent 

skinf that a committee work on these names so that ' r r. Langhofer would have them 
vailable by Septemb r 20, 1956. 

Mr. Andrew P H. i3rown of the National Geo raphic Magazine Society selected 
number of negatives of winter pictures from the National Park Service files and 
hose v;ere sent to the National Geographic Society in Washington* 

On a trip to Mary Fountain in the Hayder Valley ares on August 10 only 
few bison were seen in the upper end of the valley and several small bands of 
Ik. 









The Trout Creek hump was visited by members of the Naturalist Staff h 
imes durinf the month and on each occasion grizzly bears were observed in con- 
iderable numbers. It is estimated that on August k that at least UO different 
ri- zlies were within sight at one time. 

Dr. Edmund Schulm&n of the University of Arizona was in the Chief Park 
aturalists's" office on August 12 and at that time was iven a permit to collect 
oe staples of Limber Pine and Douglas Fir in the vicinity of Mammoth* Dr. 
chulman reported that he found some trees on the terraces that i ave indications 
f approaching 750 .years or more in are. Celled sits vere issued to the 
ollowing during the month: 

August 11 - Dixie Smith Artie Grasses 

August 13 - Thomas E. Merle-' squito-larvae, pupa & adults 

Au ust 16 • A. C. Sprang Lithol< 

Aujuft 16 - Kilian Roarer Lepidoptera 

Au ust 21 - John V. Hall Rocks 

Mr. Joe Dexter who is employed as a truck driver reported seein, a 
acoon with 3 young on the old Tover Fall road on Elk Creek. Mr. Dexter reported 
aving seen this animal end its family more than once. An attempt was made dur: 
jhe month to see or locote signs of these animals and six different trips were 
de over this road without success in laeatinf them. 

A special trip was mace to the Molly Islands and the south end of the 
utheast arm of the Lake on Au ; ust 20. At that time about 260 , oung pelican were 
bserved on the Sandy Island. Thirty young cormorants, ei ht young terns and a 
arge number of young California Gulls, were also observe-1. One young cormorant 
as banded with U. S. Fish and Wildlife band No. L<?8-832li9. Members of the party 
ho visited the Islands were: Mr. Warren Garst, Mr, •'. Perkins, I-'r. . ofc£, 
r. Wm. Brags, «Jr., Mr. Willard Murfin and Chief Park Naturalist Condon. Several 






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bird bands were recovered from the Islands and these were reported to the Fish 

:id Wildlife Service. One fish taj was recovered Kid it was reported to ' r. 
(Oliver Cope. 

On Friday, August 2li Chief Fark Naturalist Condon accompanied Superinendeat 
Sogers | V.r, Jack E. Keynes, Assistant Superintendent Hamilton, and Ranger Hat Lacey 
]to the Mcll. Islands and the south end of tne southo&st arm of the lake. On this 

rip the also visited the south arm of trie Lake and returned by Frank and Dot 
jEsiands. 

Mr, George Tracy reported that on the evening of Augu t 23 he had cross 

;ne highway in front of uis automobile an immature Mountain Lion. The area where 

ihe Lion was seen was the Villow Park section between Apollinaris Spring and the 
[ndian Creek Campground road. 

Evidence indicated this year that most of the F.icketpins had tone into 
libernation by Au. ust 10 and only an occasional a imal nas been seen since that 
late, 

"uring part of July and throughout the month of August Frank A, Tomaris 
md wife Sonia have been hikin, the trails of Yellowstone staying in the campgrounds 
ind participating in many of the activities sponsored o the Rational Park Service. 
'r. Tomaris is an eh teacher in the Chicago Public Schools and has poetic 
pendencies. V.r, Tomaris at the end of Au. ust spent several da e xai ■ Yellow- 

stone Park Research Library and we had an opportunity to .read some 60 poems which 
le had written on Yellowstone and Yellowstone subjects* any of t tese werf- ver„ 
Interesting and v,ell written, Thej ive evidence that tne Tomaris 's have der 
great deal of benefit from their 6 weeks or more of experiences in this park. 

On August 21 tne Blue Spring on the main terrace which has been v< 
ictive over at the point < f the glacial moraine dried up completely. It resumed 
low t-.e nc:ct day and within a week the volume of ater had again increased until 
t was flooding approximately the same area occupied before the spr led up, 
ncreased activity is taking place out on the center of main terrace and near the 
ront which may mean that during September there will be a shift in water flow 
rom the Blue Spring to this new zone, 

I brary 



Mrs. Lucile B. Wagner was employed during the major part of the month 
a tne librarian by the Yellowstone Library and I'useum Association and dui 
hf.t time she made an inventory of the books in the librar and accessioned and 
atalo; ed a large number of items. 

The following is a general ac: ount of the use of trie librar for the 
onth cf Julyt 

Bosks received ------ -- --- - - - ^ 

Magazines --------------------- -2h 

Pamphlets -_-----.--. .„-..]_]_ 

Books in Circulation -- io3 

Books on Indefinite Loan ------------ 123 












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itural History Association 

The asseeiatioa employed Mrs. ' ucile B. Wagner as librarian, Mrs. 
Llice H. Quist as Clerk and also employed Kiss Marianne Condon to work on galley 
>roof reading end to insert the errata sheets in the Yellowstone's Bannock 
Indian Trails publication. Miss Condon was employed for I4.6 hours at $1,00 per 
lour. 

On August 2 the superintendent received a vigorous memorandum criticizing 
he association on its publication M Yellowstone's Bannock T lian Trails" by Vlayne 
', Replo:;le. The association was requested to take the publication off from public 
ales until certain corrections were made. This book was taken off sale on 
, an errata sheet was prepared and it was returned to public sale on August 9, 
"he association ran off an errata sheet for over 800 copies, had this sheet placed 
ji them and then returned them to the field for sale. 

Daring the month several batches of galley proof for the book the H F1 
>f Yellowstone National Park" were received and this alley proof was reviewed by 
rs. Lucile Wagner and "arianne Condon. It was returned to the Wheelwright Litho- 
■raphing Co. for corrections. On August 7 tne final shipment of 77 boxes of 

Look, "Tne Story of Han in Yellowstone" by M. D, Beal was received from the Wheel- 
*ight Lithoprinters. A total of li^8l books were received. 2$ copies of this book 

1 'ere i^en to Dr. Bral on A a ost 2 for hi ose. 



Mr. Poy Armstrong paid the Association |$5*0Q for the l6mm Eastman sound 
otion picture projector, Model t -a?3* 

A chflHQi setup of the book, "Pla its of Yellowstone National Park" was made 
p on August 28 and sent to the Wheelwrl ht Lithographing Co, to determine whether 
r not the page umbering was in order. As soon as this has been deteiTnined the 
inal proof for the book can .e completed and it will be ready to go to press. 

The association purchased several books for the Yellowstone Park Research 
library during the month of August, 

The public address u it projector which was stolen from the Old Faithful 
mphith^ater on July 7 was found in the woods near the Old Faithful Spray field, 
ndamaged and has been returned to the headquarters museum in Mammoth, 

quipment a n d Supplies 



On August 21 the clerk-stenographer's typewriter was repaired. On Au 
1 fifty new padlocks were obtained and are going to be used for locking up various 
nits of equipment and store rooms used b.< the division. These locks will have a 
tandard key so that personnel needing to have access to t ese facilities will be 
ble to get into these various places without carrying a large number of keys. On 
his sare date a carryin case for the new Exacta Camera was obtained. the 
onth a number of pieces of furniture were obtained for use in seasonal naturalist 
uarters and 100 ?t. of new garden hose was purchased for the Norris Museum. 

lotographic and Visual Aids 



On Au, ust 8 Park Naturalist Beal helped Andrew H. Brown select winter 
5gatives for use in the National Geographic Magas ne. On August 23 Park Naturalist 












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leal took several pictures of , iris who were being held in the Mammoth Jail, 
/at film were developed for the Chief Rangers Office and in addition several 
*ilm packs were processed in the dark room consisting of pictures of flowers, 
dldlife and general park subjects. There were 80 8x10 enlargements made and 
Lbout bO LixJ? contact prints. 

respectively submitted, 



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David at L. Condon 
Chief Fi-rk Naturalist 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park October ?, 1 

Chief Park Natu: slist 

Monthly Report for September, 1956 
Special Activities and Conferences 



Mr. Horace H 4 Albright) former Director of the al Park Service 
stopped in the Chief Perk Naturalist 1 a Office for inspection of the museum . 
l visit on September 6. 

On September 1? Mr. Larrj Madison of Madison Production, Inc., a movie 
>roducer from "ev York called Ion; distanee an Laquirs seibilil 

f obtaining movie - pictures which would illustrate the adverse effect of insect 
ests on forest areas, ""r. Hadison late- i con- 

act the Chief Park ''aturalist. 

On September 18 Park Naturalist Ccndon participated in an inspection of, 
nd a conference concerain development of \ in Vill . rs 

n attendance at this meeting were Director Conrad L. Wirthj Superintendent Rogers} 
ctinc Superintendent Warren - Lltonj Landscape Architect Fx ittsonj and Park 
ngineer Garry Howe, 

The regular Staff Meeting was attended by the Chief Park ilist in 
he conference room on aber 20. 

On September 20 a sileage lo ";:r> u iocatj areas 

nd wayside exhibit sites on the road from Mammoth to Vest Thumb via Madison and 
Id Faithful, On tl la data apota vera larked for J . cement of tl s Con- 
inental Divide signs on the south approach road and the east end of the Old Faithful, 
at Thumb road. 

On September 20 Pr. 1 . ossell, er from r estern 

rfice of Design and Construction arrived in the park and remained here to the 2Uth 
m he was taken to Cody, t . . ssell made a 

*ther check on parking areas, wayside exhibit and interpretive sign sites. 

Dr. Gordon Fredine, Biologist from the Director's Office was in the Chief 
irk Naturalist's Office on September 25 for about 5 ~- 7 . 

On September 28 Park Naturalist Condon beet 

*ank Mattson to the Canyon, "uc Volcano area for the purpose or pinnin down a 
>cttion for Ma, side " I tive aigns and wayside exhibits and discussed the 
irking area development with Engineer v erington. 

Earl in the month P&rk Naturalist Condon worked up the proposed expend- 
itures for the Division for the 1957 Fiscal year. 



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;li ious Services and Char '.1 $± 

The regular Student Ministry Program of reli ;ious cervices in the Yellow- 
jtone National Park Chapel continued through Sunday, September 30. The last ser- 
rices of the Student Ministry Program out in the park were conducted on September 
> with services being held in the Old Faithful Recreation Hall. Roman Catholic 
lervices terminated on September 2 and the LDS services on .September 9. 

On September h the committee for a Christian Ministry in Yellowstone National 
>ark held thetr annual fall nesting and at that time transacted the business of the 
nization and received from the Student Minister in charge, a report on the act- 
vities of the Summer Ministry Fro; rem. The program was highly successful in all 
espects and from the monies received as offerings it was able to pay all expenses 
f operations and make a generous contribution to the National Council of Churches 
hristian Ministry Fund. 

On September 8 at 3*00 p.m. Mite Bonnie K. Larkin, daughter of George and 
telle Larkin # was married to Mr, Jako Sion in the Yellowstone National Park Chapel. 
he Rev. Puane Murphy performed the services. On September 18 Mrs. ialbot and 
r. Arden Parkes were married in the Yellowstone National Pi impel at 2*00 p.m. 
he Rev. Edward A. Syms of Livingston, Montana performed the services. 

Rev. Duaim Kurphy who served as the student minister at Lthful during 
e season of 1955 and as the resident minister at Mammoth during 1955 and 1956 ter- 

ated his services here on September 8 and left the park for Tulsa, Oklahoma on 
ptember 9# Rev. Kurphy rendered the community splendid service and he is going 
be disced b, those who have participated in the worship services. •. rt 
omson is succeeding Mr. Murphy as the resident minister for the winter months, A 
|[)tluck supper as a farewell party for Duane Kurphy was held at the ttammoth Canteen 
the evening of September 7. 

The re ular winter Sunday School program began on September 16 and will 
1 1 held in the Yellowstone National Perk Chapel each Sunday morning during the winter 
bnths. Frank Mattson is superintendent of the Sunday School this year. 

I t-Service Training 



Mr. Thad Stevens and Tennis Brown were Iven "one training instructions 
4 the proper binding, titling, and classifying of 2x2 kodaslides. in addition to 
\\is Mr. Stevens was iven some instructions and training on the preparation of 
fudy skins for the museum collection. 

The Yellowstone Weekly News was mimeographed and distributed by the 
Iterpretive Division, 

Srsonnel 



Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month except for annual leave taken 
the 13th and Urth, Park Naturalist Real was on duty all month. Park Naturalist 
srs was on duty all month except for annual leave taken on the 18th, 21st, and 
id, Clerk-Stenographer Shirley Van Gilder was on duty all month except for sick 
lave taken on September 26, 






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The entire seasonal personnel were furloughed by the months close and 

the following dates indicate the date on which employees were released in furlough 
status at the close of business i 

Sept. 1 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 6 

Sept. 6 

Sept. 9 

Sept, 9 

Sept. 9 

Sept. 9 

Sept. 13 

Sept. 13 

Sept. 13 

Sept. 13 

Sept. 19 

Sept. 25 

spt. 27 

Sept. 29 



Wallace A* Good 


fudtloujijhed 


William T. riscoll 


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Donald C, Stewart 


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Robert Turner 


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Arthur "ash 


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Robert J. Jonas 


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Frank P. Rentchler 


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M, D. Seal 


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Joseph R, Murphy 


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Dr. V. E. Saul 


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William ". Phillip! 


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Ted J. Parkinson 


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Lowell G. Biddulph 


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Elmer Andersen 


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3. J. -encher 


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Dennis Brown 


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Thad Stevens 


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George D. Marler 


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Riley B, McClelland 


terminated 


Janitors: 




Eluon Jenkins 


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Richard P. Korrell 


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Eugene C, Devenpcrt 



Sept, 2 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 20 



Mr. George D, Marler, park naturalist at Old Faithful reported injuring 
Ls back while lifting on an automobile which was stuck on the rock wall near 
>nita Pool on September 1, Reports were submitted in detail on the incident. 

iterpretive Services 



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The interpretive pro; ram as presented at Various field stations out in 
e park was terminated et tnose stations on the folia tesi 



West Thumb 

Canyon 

Madison Junction 

Norris Geyser Basin 

Fishing Bridge 

Old Faithful 



September 3 
September 6 
September 13 
September 13 
September 13 
September 29 



Mammoth has continued to offer interpretive services to special ^roups 
Ad the museum has remained open for public use. The program as provided at the 
ield stations continued to diminish in the variety of services rendered with the 
iduction of park visitation and the increasing reduction of personnel. Evening 
pograms were presented at Mammoth, Old Faithful and Fishin. : 3ridge up to the time 
te establishments were closed. 















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Park Naturalist Condon presented a special talk to the State Park's Con- 
rent ion Group at Jackson Lake Lodge on September 9. There were about 200 persons 
_n attendance at the pro gran and the talk given was on the inspirational resources 
!bund in Yellowstone. It was illustrated with a 16mm movie. On September 11, this 
lame State Park's Convention Group were conducted on an auto caravan guided by 
ark Naturalist Condon and ierk Ranger Otto M. Brown through Yellowstone Park, 
'here were 17 cars participating in the caravan and about 70 people. In addition 

embers of the State Park's Convention Group a number of park visitors in 
heir automobiles joined the roup and participated in the visits to points of in- 
erest, A special itinerary was se£ up for this pro; ram and adnered to. 

On the evening of September 19 a special campfire day program was held 
t Madison Junction for the purpose of commemorating the campfire held at this site 
n September 19, 1870 when the Washburn-Langford-' bane Party was camped there and 
he National Park idea was suggested. A simulated camp of the Washburn Pany was 
et up at the original site and individuals posed for pictures which to some degree 
ovtray the scene as it might have appeared in 1870, A tent was erected, saddles 
nd other gear arranged in the camp area and a packhorse and mule were used for 
tmosphere. Park Naturalist Condon gave a short talk to a group of .about 150 people 

the site where the Washburn Party camped. This aspect of the program was followed 
V a general picnic at the Madison Campground and then a campfire j ro ram in the 
ampfire circle at the campground. Director Conrad L, Virth spoke to the groups 

did also Superintendent Rogers and Mr* Jack E. Haynes. Park Naturalist Condon 
srved as Kaster of Ceremonies for the program and all in all it proved to be successful. 

A new amphitheater has been under construction during the month at 'West 
lumb and considerable progress has been made toward the installation of the bench 
Lers and the general layout of the amphitheater. 

Park Naturalist Beal presented two special programs during the month. On 
Bptember 2 he gave a talk on H Ge,vserland in \ inter," at the Canyon Hotel to the Rural 
ail Carriers Association of Idaho, Montana, and ' yoming. There were about hOO persons 
attendance. On the evening of September 3 he presented this same talk and program 
the Canyon amphitheater to 5u shivering people. Park Naturalist Condon gave a 

rk on the inspirational resources of Yellowstone using kodaslides as illustrations 
30 people at the St. Andrews Church in Livingston, Montana on September 23 • 

On September 26 Park Naturalist Condon gave a 30 minute talk to hO geol 
udents from the Park County Highs chool of Livingston in the Headquarters Museum 
d then took the group on a one hour guided trip over the hot spring terraces at 

oth. This party then went to Old Faithful and were taken on a ruided trip over 
yser Hill by Park Naturalist George D. Marler. 

All of the announcements and advertising for the interpretive services 
1 1 rendered in Yellowstone were taken down during the month and are now in storage. 
lie Clematis Gulch and Green Dragon Spring self-ruiding nature trail labels were 
il taken in on September h* 

llseum Activities and Exhibits 

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A representative set of rock specimens from Yellowstone were sent to the 
1st Lansing Jr. Highschool during the month. On September 12 we received from Mr. 
Jancis P. Farquhar letters and manuscripts pertaining to H. P. Langford and his 



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associations with Yellowstone. These had been given to Mr. Ansel Hall by Langford 
W, Smith and in some manner had arrived in Kr. Ferquhar's possession and he in 
turn has forwarded them to Yellowstone. 

On September 25 a search was made of Yellowstone Park correspondence 
files and the museum records for detailed information concerning the Birdie Earl 
collection of Nez Perce Indian material which is on loan to Yellowstone National 
Park. This information was assembled and sent to Dr. Carl P. Russell. 

The museums were closed to public use as follows: Norris - September 
13) Kadison Junction - September 13; Fishing Bridge - September 13 J Old : ful - 
eptember 29) and the Mammoth Museum is continuing to be kept open for public 
risitors. All of the other museums were closed, shutters placed on them and they 
*er' placed in readiness for winter. The buildings will be braced against snow 
Loads early in October. Turin;, the month exhibit cases at Mammoth and Fishing 
3ridge were fumigated and cleaned on the inside. A new supply of case lighting 
julbs were secured and new bulbs were placed in a large number of the cases. 

lesearch and Observation 



The autumn leaves during the month of September presented one of the 
inest displays of color that have been seen in years. One of trie unusual char- 
tcteristics of the colors this fall has been the intense reds which have ap eared 
the aspens and all of the oldtimers in the area have been commenting that this 
s the first year that they have ever seen as much red as has been evidenced across 
he north side of the park. 

The superintendent appointed a Place Names Committee consisting of Park 
aturalist Condon, Chairman) members of the committee Jack E. Hayens, M. ♦ al, 
farren F. Hamilton, Otto M» nrown and Aubrey L. Haines. This committee met in the 
Ihief Park Naturalist's Office on September. 17 and at that time agreed to a series 
it suggested names for features in the southwest corner of the park. > r. Joel 
^anghofer, in charge of the U.S.G.S. Mapping Crew met with the committee and suggested 
lames for some features. Mr. Langhofer was in the Chief F&rk Naturalist's Office 
igain on the 18th gathering additional information on the place names. 

On September 12 and again on the 18th trips were made over Mt« Washburn 
md on both occasions the visibility ¥as excellent and the panorama as seen from 
hat point was most inspiring. On September 21, 22 and 2li Park Naturalist Condon 
>articipated in roadside studies bein made for the location of parking areas and 
iull-outs and the establishment sites for the installation of either interpretive 
ixhibits or interpretive markers. On the 21st. Kir. Charles Kruger and Dr. Carl P. 
tussell worked with Park Naturalist Condon and on the 22nd. and 2itth. Park Naturalist 
London and Dr. Russell accumulated data which should be of value. Hurried surveys 
ere made of the approach roads from the south, west, east and northeast as well 
around the main loop road. 

Park Naturalist Condon, at the close of the month wrote an article on the 
Tizzly bear which he has submitted to the Wyoming Wildlife for publication in that 
jiagazlne. On September 26 District Ranger Karl Gilbert and Park Ranger Te liackett 
ade an attempt to get Morning Glory Fool to erupt but with no s access. Another 
ttempt will be made during October to get this pool to erupt in hopes that it will 
isgorge from its vent much of the trash which has been thrown into it by park 
isitors. 






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Library ; 

There was no librarian on duty during the month of September. The field 
libraries which were issued to all of the field stations were returned to the park 
lieadquarters and these were retime I to the stacks alter careful inspection. 

The following is a general account of the se of the lib; for the 
nonth of September i 

Books received -29 

Magazines ------- — -------- — -16 

Pamphlets 29 

Books in Circulation - - ----- - -181 

Books on Indefinite Loan - - - , — --- -122 

atural History Association 



The Yellowstone Library and Museum Association obtained copyrights on 
he "Yellowstone's Bannock Indian Trails" by ftayne F. Heplogle and on the book, 
The Story of Man in Yellow stone" by Br. > . D. Beal. 

The cover design for the Yellowstone plants book was selected after being 
ined by members of the Board of Directors and returned to the printers on Sept. 
5 with instructions to proceed with the preparation of a cover following that 
sign. During the month long distance phone calls were completed vrith the Vheel- 
Lithoprinters for discussions concerning the Yellowstone plants book. Park 
turalist Beal devoted a great deal of time during the month to the review of 
lley proof and to the completing of the index for the plants book and at the 
nths close the entire galley proof and all of the materials were back in the 
jrinters hands pending the preparation of a final galley proof. 

The book sales with the various field stations of the association were 
'Ispended as follows: Madison Junction - September 12$ Pishing Bridge - September 
JBj Old Faithful - September 29 J and Mammoth - September 30. The large :;tock of 
boks which were on hand and which have been published by the association have been 
[.aced in stora e in the space alloted to the Interpretive Division at the Mammoth 
i.orehouse. Removal of these books from the museum basement and bookroom have given 
I little more room in the basement. 

uiproent and Supplies 

Park Naturalist T./ers spent a good part of the month winterizing the 
irters used by seasonal personnel, taking inventory of the Division's property 
id otner worthwhile work of this character. No new equipment «r supplies were 
fltained by the Division during the month of September, 

)tographic and Visual Aids 

Thirty-six Ick$ films were exposed during the month and teaee were processed 
t of these were taken of the camp lire program at adison Junction. All of the 
io-visual aids equipment has been brou. ht in from field stations and alon>, with 



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ithe 16mm movies and all of the slide sets. These are all to require con- 
siderable work to service then and pj.ace tnera back in first-class condition for 
use next season* 

Turin; the month the seasonal park r -naturalists, in any spare time 
t^e.v had, were used to bind kodaslides, work on the photo files and otherwise con- 
tribute to the furtherance of routine jobs, 

188 original Yellowstone kodaslides were sent to > 1 eston*s for duplication, 
lides which were on loan to the Grolier Society were returned. 

Respectively submitted, 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 

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museum 
DCondon/svg 



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Monthly Report for October, 1956 
S pecial Activities and Conferences: 



Superintendent, Yellowstone Park November 5, 1956 



Chief Park Naturalist 



Park Naturalist 3eal visited the Big Hole Battlefield Nations ;ment 
while on annual leave the 15th through the 19th. Thorough study was made of the 
area at the tine and it gave Mr. Beal an opportunity to stud;/ the area in relation 
to the rroposed developments for it, Mr. Beal at te Activities Committee 
tee ting on October 30. 

On October 30 Park Naturalist Beal received a subpoena to appear in court 
t Powell, Wyoming o i r ovember 29 for a Civil Court case resulting from an automobile 
.ccident which occurred on the Gallatin Highway on August 29, 1953. Park Naturalist 
teal investigated this accident at the time he was serving as j est 

fellowstone. 

Fark Naturalist Tvers devoted cc siderable time to closing the cabins and 
rcperlv storing the furniture and supr lies used by seasonal personnel i te also 
ievoted several days time taking inventory s museums and cabins. The museums 
anc cabins were shored up by members of the Engineering Division c'uri. month, 
wad at the Month* s close they were in full readiness for idleness during the winter. 

Park Naturalist Condon devoted some time to the review of Miss Speiser'e 
nanuscript for a new information folder and made a number of corrections in text facts 
;o brin,/ them in conformance with the known information. Park on attend- 

ed the regular staff meeting on October h} a special staff meetin^ on the .at 
rhich time Kr. Arthur Gilmore and Parke Soule reviewed the ew account inj stem. On 
ihe 25th he attended the last staff meeting of the te last one over which 

Superintendent Rogers would preside as Superintendent of Yellowstone. 

Park naturalist Condon picked up Mr. L Julum, and employee of the 
-il Construction Co., who was driving at a speed of 80 miles per hour through th< 
illow Park area. This occurred on October 15 an the case came up before the 
United States Commissioner Mr. Julum plead guilty and vas fined tlO.OO. 

On the 18th Fark Naturalist Condon accompanied Park Engineer Garry Rowe 
lign Maker Cene McCloud on a trip around the loop and out to the East Entrance and on 
.Jiis junket decisions were made concerning the revision of a number of s the 
placement of signs. 

eu ions Services and Chapel Use: 

The Student Minister Robert Thomson was . iven office space in tne museum 
milding for use during the winter on October 1. The office occupied by the stu 
tinister will be the one used by seasonal naturalists during the summer season. 



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The Yellowstone National Park Chapel was used each Sun the month 

for the regularly scheduled protestant religious services. These were Sunday School 
at 10:00 a.m. under the direction of Sunday School Superintendent Frank Matt son and 
the regular church services at 11:15 a.m. conducted • ant .inister Robert Thomson, 
The Youth Fellowship meetings alternated each Sunday between Mammoth and Gardiner and 
*ere held at 6:30 p.m. 

On the evening of the 18th the Gardiner-Mammoth Winter Ministry Committee 
leld a church potluck supper for people of both communities in tne Canteen. Follow- 
Af the supper Walter Kittams served as chairman of a general meeting for the purpose 
>£ discussing the financing of the winter Ministry Program. 

n*-Service Training: 



On the evening of October 22 eight men from the Mechanical Division went to 
ivin, cton on their own time to attend a 3§ hour training session. During this train- 
ng period they had the opportunity to have reviewed for them engine tune-up, electri- 
al trouble shooting and carburetion. The training pro: ram was sponsored by the 
entral Motor Supply of Livingston, Montana. The training film: supplied by 
arious manufacturers. Men attending this session felt that it was highly beneficial. 

The Interpretive Division continued to rainu distribute the Yellow - 

tone Deekly Nows. 



ersonneli 



Clerk-Stenographer Shirley Van Gilder was on all month. Park Naturalist 
ondon was on duty all month except for 16 hours annual leave taken on the 22nd and 
Iith. Park Naturalist Seal used 56 hours of annual leave between the 15th and 19th and 
n the 25th and 26th. Park Naturalist Tyers used 6li hours annual leave from the 22nd 
hrough the 31st. 

Mr. Riley B. McClelland who was on indefinite appointment as a park ran. 
aturalist was terminated as a Yellowstone employee so that he could enroll as a per- 
anent employee at Carlsbad national Park. 

rterpretive Services: 



The self -guiding nature trail signs were all taken down and brought into 
ark headquarters for vrinter storage during the month. 

On the 2oth a long report was received from the Western Office of resign 
instruction consisting o: the roadlog and the map on whichiinterprc . ive division signs 
id exhibits were listed. This was prepared by Dr. Carl P. Russell in the rough and 
111 be completed in final detailed form by members of the Yellowstone Interpretive 
l vision in November. 

On October 30 work was begun on a complete revision of the Interpretive 
Inr^lopment Outline. 

heeum Activities and Exhibits: 



Park Naturalist Beal has prepared a key map for all of the aerial-pho" 
Iirchased by the Yellowstone Library and Museum Association of Yellowstone, and 



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these have been filed with their index in the library. Preparation of this map 
and index facilitates very auch the use of these photos. All of the museums in 
the interior of the park were closed during the month but the Mammoth M seum 
has been kept open and UiO people have used.it. 

The wa. side exhibits were available for public inspection and use throu - 
out the entire month of October. There will be shuttered after Lrst of 
November, 

On October 15 Perk Naturalist Condon accompanied Park Engineer Kaines and 
at that time inspected the amphitheaters which m epairs and improvements. 
Following that date the Engineering Division personnel made repairs at the Canyon 
Amphitheater, put a stage and a large number of new logs in the Fie hi dge 
Amphitheater, put new lo { s in the Old Faithful Amphitheater and prepared to re- 
place old logs in the campfire circle at Madison Junction. 

Research and Observation! 



On October 2 Park Naturalists David Beal and Condon hauled a brown-colored 
black bear from Mammoth to Hay den Valley and released it. This bear was somewhat 
bewildered after its long ride from ''ammoth and when released from the trap, ran 
for about 1^ miles without stop, in§ . On this same date the H: id Hot Spring 
area near Mary fountain were observed thoroughl and expiL ore cU There were some 
unusual examples of beautiful sulphur crystals formed in many of the fumerile vents. 
That evening there were only 2 grizzly bear observed at Trout Creek rump. In 
the Highland Hot Spring: area the carcasses of ij bison which had apparently died 
during the winter of 195^-5^ were found. These consisted of 1 cow, 2 calves, and 
one young bull,, 

On October 3 a very unusual phenomena was observed when a black bear and 
coyote were seen working as a pair begging from automobiles. The animals would 
approach a car from either side and they were watched, for some time and seemed 
to be working together. This unusual alliance between animals was observed near 
the point where the old road pa3t Lake of the ;es off below Obsidian Cliff. 

On October 3 Pistrirt Ranger Karl Gilbert and Park Hanger Ted Hackett 
pumped down the Morning Glory Pool in an attempt to make it erupt and thus orge 
debris which had been thrown in during the summer months. On this date the pool 
was pumped down 6 feet and the water temperatures raised to 200° near the surface 
and 205° in the violent boiling section. In an at empt to make it erupt soap was 
added but this did not bring about eruption and at lit 00 p.m. pumping was stopped 
with Morning Glory at times boiling up at 8 or 9 feet but never going into a 
violent eruption. At the months close the pool was back to normal and still con- 
tains the debris of the past season. 

On October 11 a trip was made to Obsidian ClifJ to select obsidian speci- 
mens for the Royal Ontario Museum of Toronto, Ontario and on this same trip an 
inspection was made of the Black fragons Caldron in Hayden Valle; and a hike was 
made cown the new trail which is being constructed at the brink of the Lover Fall. 
that evening the Trout Creek Tump was visited and where in mid-August there were 
as many as 1*0 grizzly bear only one grizzly was observed. 

On October 1 Cle Quist brought into the museum a Great Cray Owl which had 
been killed by flying into the side of an automobile near Otter Creek. This 
specimen was prepared as a study-skin specimen by Park Naturalist Tyers. 



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Considerable work was done during the month on the preparation or place 
names recommendations but work on this project was halted by shortage of forms. 
Additional forms were ordered during the month but at the month's close tnese 
had not yet been received. 

Park Naturalist Condon submitted an article on the Yellowstone Grizzly 
for publication in the Wyoming Wildlife Magazine. This article was completed 
and sent to them on Cctober 5. 

Mr. S. R. Wilkinson of Idaho Falls was given it one gallon cans of traver- 
tine specimens during the month. These were obtained from the vicinity of Cupid 
Spring and on the main terraces. Mr. \ ilkinson received these on October 8 and 
plans to use them in some research work which he is conductin; • 

Library: 

The following is a general account of the use of the library for the 
month of October i 

Books received --------- — ----- ---_ -12 

Magazines ---------------------- —21 

Pamphlets 15 

Books in Circulation ---- — - --- -- — - - - -l8l 

Books on Indefinite Loan -122 

Mr. Rogers gave to the Yellowstone Park Library a number of periodicals 
many of which round out our collections and others which will be surplust to our 
needs but will be made available to other parks. 

Natural History Association * 

The Yellowstone Library and Museum Association completed the review of the 
galley proof and dummy of the Yellowstone Park Plants publication and returned t 
to the Wheelwright Printing Co. on October 2. During the month the Wheelwright 
people returned the colored slides used for illustr. 1 the plants book and have 
indicated that by earl; November they will make available a blueprint copy of the 
finished book. 

The Association's two publications "Yellowstone's Bannock Indian Trails" 
Replogle and "The Story of Man in Yellowstone? b; ■'. . Beal have both enjoyed a 
popular sales during the 1956 travel season. Up-to-date there have been 1019 
copies of the Bannock Trails sold and 1053 copies of Beal's book. 

Turing the month the dummies for 3 issues of Yellowstone Park Nature Notes 
were completed and the material in them edited and these 3 issues will be 
early in November and distributed to Mature Note subscribers. This will complete 
the 1956 edition of Nature Motes. 

Equipment and Sup] lies;. 

During the month orders were prepared for projection bulbs, photo flashbulbs 
and other special supylies of this type. In addition an order spared 
film stock. 



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Park Naturalist T ers received a new desk on October h as new property 
for the iivision and in addition to that we received on October 17 a tripod from 
surplus and also 117 rolls of 16mm ansco-color film which, although it is a year 
outdated, will probably work out satisfactorily. 

On October 11 we ordered an adrtressograph machine and sup; lies from the 
surplus listing of property. 

Photographic and Visual Aids^ 

The h ■■-$ SpeedgrapMc camera was on loan to the Engineers during part of 
the month. Enlargements on Inspiration Point oev&opments were made and sent to 
the Washington Office, They also received from us enlargements of the Campfire 
Pay activities at Madison Junction, Pictures were taken of Mr. Scotty Bauman and 
sent to the press. 

On October 17 an assortment of colored autumn pictures were sent to the 
National Geographic Magazine at their request and these were returned to us 
the month's close with the indications they were not the- type of pictures that 
the National Geographic used because we did not have people in the pictures. 

Considerable work was none in the darkroom b ^.uralists 3eal, T\ , 
and Conaon in the preparation of enl; and processing of film. 



David de L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



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Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park ember 3, 1956 

Chief Pi-rk Naturalist 

Monthly Report for November, 1956. 
paoial Activities and Conferences; 



Park Katurallst Condon took Mr. and rs. T evereux Butcher on a trip to 
he rr pper Geyser Basin and return on November 7. The weather was ideal and con- 
iderable time was spent in taking pictures. The Butchers* had an opportur 
o see several of the large <■ sers in eruption and in winter conditions and also 
ibserved a large number of inter I Is. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Overton of Pueblo, Colorado were in the Chief Park 
'aturalist's office on November 9 and were iven some assistance on localities 
here certain wildlife forms might be found and photographer . Mr. Overton is a 
ildlife photos rapher and writer for sports ma. azines. 

Park Naturalist Condon attended the regular staff meet in: on November 8 
mo all of the naturalists in the Division attended the staff meeting held on Nov. 
7 which was the first one under Superintendent Larrison. 

Mr. Robert J. Jonas who has served as a park ranger-naturalist for several 
ears arrived in Yellowstone on the 17th and stayed through the 18 and 19th and left 
n the 21st. Mr. Jonas was anxious to have personal experiences in Yellowstone dur- 
ng the winter sc that he would be better equipped to serve the people during the 

r months. Jonas is head of the Biology Dept. at Lewistown, Idaho - Normal 
raining School. 

Conferences were held on November 26 on the Wildlife Management Pro ram 
nd on the Canyon development contracts. Park Naturalist Condon helped revise and 
dd to the news release on the Management Flan for the Northern Yellowstone Elk Herd. 
ark Naturalist Beal encountered a drunken driver on the road between Mammoth and 
ardiner on the evenin iber 28 at about 11: [}0 p.m. Be got Park j r Perkins 
nd assisted him in handling the case. 

eli.y ous Services a - ' g cl - e , ; n 



The Yellowstone National Park Chapel at Mammoth was u. c ch Sunday for 
le regular Sunday School services at 10:00 a.m. and for the Gardiner-Mammoth winter 
Lnistry church services at 11:15 a.m. Both of these services have been well attend- 
Student Minister Robert Thomson functioned as pastor for the church services and 
is also directed the v outh Fellowship programs. The Youth Fellowship group has al- 
ernateri between Mammctn and Gardiner during the month in tneir meetings. A special 
inks( ivin^ Day Service was conducted by this group in the Gardiner Chapel. 



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Yellowstone Weekly News sneet. 

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The Interpretive Division continued- to mimeograph and distribute the 



ersonnel: 



Chef Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month except for 31 hours 
al leave taken at odd times durinj the month* Park Naturalist Beal was on 
11 month except for 68 hours annual leave taken during the period of November 5 
.hrough lh and November 27 and 28. Park Naturalist Tyers was on duty all ex- 
:ept for 8 hours annual leave taken November 1. Clerk-Stenographer Shirley Van 
ilder was on duty all month except for 32 hours annual le ":en tiuring the per- 
od of November 19-23 • 

Park Naturalist Beal was requested to go to Cc , >ming on November 27 
nd 28 to appear in a Civil Suit between the V-l Oil 2o rid the Z 's Bakeries, 

nc. The suit involved an accident which occurred on August 29, 195>3* and was in- 
estigated by Park Naturalist Beal when he was a ranger at the West Entrance, 

nterpretive Services; 



The interpretive services of the Division were not active during the month 
nd no outside talks or programs were given by the Naturalist staff members. The 
ord 16mm magnetic .sound motion picture on Yellowstone vas loaned to Travis Howe 
f the McAlester Fuel Co., Magnolia, irkansas and was returned on the 13th. 

The Interpretive Development Outline for Yellowstone was redone in draft 
orm and copies were .- iven to Superintendent Garrison and Assistant Superintendent 
amilton for review and comments on November 16. In addition to the Interpretive 
evelopment Outline a rought draft of an Interpretive Master Plan set was prepared 
r review and corrections before the completion of final copies. 

Fark Naturali; t Tyers took down the map signa from the Mammoth Hot Spring 
'jerracs for refinishing and prevention of further weathering. 

A complete set of 980 kodasli ,es were sent on loan to Mr. William Bugas 
f tie Ford Motor Co., at Houston, Texas. Mr. Bu as is going to use these si 
:p presenting a series of programs about Yellowstone on Television. The programs 
fe.ll appear each Saturday for 6 weeks and will be broadcast from the Houston, Texas 
fcation in color, A set of kodaslides were also sent to Dr. Arthur Hash at Minn., 
IJLnnesota for his use in presenting programs to roups in that area. 

Iiseum Activities and Exhibits: 



The exhibit shutters were placed on all of the roadside exhibit structures 
November 1 by Park Naturaliste Beal and Condon* During the month Park Engineer 
ines and Fark Landscape Architect Frank liattson looked over trie proposed amp 
teater site at Mammoth with Fark Naturalist Condon, On November 9 a 1000 lb. speci- 
isn of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff was snipped to the museum at Toronto, Canada, 

Park Naturalist Condon conferred with Mattson concerning the Canyon Develo] ■ 
imt and especially the visitor center on November 13. 






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On November 28 Park Naturalist Condon accompanied Superintendent Garrison, 
Asistant Superintendent Hamilton and Landscape Architect Mattson on a trip to Old 
tithful, Canyon, and Lake for the purpose of reviewing in the field proposals for 
jadside exhibits and interpretive stations. They also discussed the amphitheater 
.te at Canyon. 

Park Naturalist Beal prepared the skin of a coyote -which was picked up 
r Superintendent Garrison and Chief Ranger Otto Brown on November 26. This skin 
being tanned for use as a study-skin specimen^. 

ssearch and Observations: 



On November 1 two out of fifty-three geese on the river between Lake and 
an.;, on were observed to be wearing orange neckbands and on 'oveiftber 15 Park ■. atura- 
Lsts Beal and Tyers observed three geese with orange neckbands. On November 2 
i the Firehole iver one out of nine geese observed elan, that stream had an or; 
sckband. The observations of these birds have been reported to the Wyomi tate 
Lsh and Game Dept» 

A lot of swan and geese have been observed alon the river and the r 
rea of Yellowstone Lake on field trips made to those areas and Park Naturalist Seal 
as this to say in his report on observations made on er 15s 

On November 15 Park Naturalists Beal and Tyers observed e fox at the 
Duth end of Swan Lake Flat. On this same day swan were counted as follows: 60 at 
le outlet of Yellowstone Lake (6 were c gnets), 19 two miles below Fishin 
i Yellowstone iver, lU near the Dragons Mouth area (7 were cygnets), and i alts 
Bar the Dragons Mouth area. This makes a total of 99 swan seen, of which at least 
3 appeared to be cygnets. The relative number of Whistling Swan and Trumpeter Swan 
this count is unknown. 

On November 2 district Park Hanger .Karl Gilbert of Old Faithful had a most 
n usual experience in the Lower Geyser --asin. He observed magpies and a bald e; - 
n something out across the snowy flats and so stopped to investigate. Upon examining 
ne area he found one live Whistli- five dead ones. Three of the five b ; 

ad been almost entirely consumed by the birds and by coyotes. Evidence in the snow 
ndicated that the birds had crash landed on the white snow in the flats apparently 
n a severe snow storm and had attempted to get off the ground again but were un- 
ble to do so and were attacked by coyotes. The carcasses of the live birds were 
urned over to Park Naturalists Beal and Condon. Trie injured swan died during the 

t of November 2 and. an attempt will be made to salvage a study skin specimen 
rom one of the five birds. District Park Ran er Gilbert is oing to prepare a 
engthy story on his observation for Yellowstone Nature Notes. 

On November 2 Fark Naturalists Condon s al examined the Terrace Spring 
rea near Madison Junction where on other occasions a considerable number of small 
drds have been found dead in the small pits or caverns in that a"ea. Only two birds 
ere found at this time. One was a Western ob in and the other an Audubon's Warbler. 
»n this same day they observed a doe with three fawns in the Old Faithful area and 
ounted 58 bison near tne mouth of Nez Perce Creek. 

During the month evidence was found to indicate that there are black bear 
libematinf in the cave near Gem Fool in the pper Ge asinj in the cave abo t 
!00 yds, below tne bridge of the Narrows on the Gibbon River and that the black bear 
nown as "Baxter" is hibernating under the Stove Shed at Mammoth. Photographs were 















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tde of this bear in hibernation on the 18th. On "ovember 7 a bull elk with freak 
itlers wts observed on the Mammoth Hot Spring Terraces, T with respect 

the animal consisted of one tine which protruded straight down the animals nose 
lich had a large ball on it the size of a man's fist. The ball seemed to interfere 
th close grazing to the round but did not bother the animal wnen cro off 
ips of rasses and browsing on shrubs. 

The Grotto Cevser froup were observed in action on November 2, 7, 16 and 28. 
ds pronounced activity on the part of the Grotto is evidence that "he Giant is still 
i a dormant phase. On a trip to the Upper Geyser Basin on November 23 Park Nature 
tndon observed 8 bison in the Biscuit Basin, 21 at the extreme upper end of the 
iy Geyser Basin and 3 old bulls in the Madison Junction area. 

Park aturalist Condon spent considerable time on November 2ii watching the 
itting activities of the Hoc- t. [ule eei a in the zone below the Tourist 

year the Mammoth Elk Trap he observed 11 bucks and 23 does and fawns. At one 
me 7 different bucks were running 7 differ :c. fo ..'.' its between the buc 

observed. 

On November 19 a trip was made to the Norris Geyser Basin and also on the 
!nd for the purpose of observing and photographinj -host trees. 

.brar » 



Some material was obtained from the old park which are to be destr 
r the library on November 30 and there is considerable more which should be examined 
d added to the library collection before that eld material is destroyed. 

Several new books were obtained for the library and the listing of these and 
her use of the library for the month is as follows j 

Books received:- ------------------ -10 

Magazines --«--..-..- --20 

Pamphlets - - - - — .---9 

Books in cinmleitj.on- --------------- -181 

Books on indefinite loan -------------- 123 

tural History Association* 



The Vheelwrlght Lithoprinters sent to us on November 17 a b&iiie-print copy 
the book, "Plants of Yellowstone" by all am ley. In spite of our 
rrections of | alle. p ro£t and other changes there were still a number of corrections 
be made in the blue-print copy. A Ion- letter indicating the corrections desired 
8 prepared and sent to the Wheelwright Lithoprinters on November 23 and at this 
me time the blue-print copy was returned to them and t ere ; iven authority to 
oceed with the printing of the book after the corrections indicated were made in 
is negatives which were used in printing the blae-print copy. It is anticipated 
tat sometime during December copies of this book will be available. 

The May, June and Jul; , Au ust issue of Yellowstone Mat-ore Notes v 
f on the 28th, 29th, and 30th. It is anticipate t they will be placed in the 
11 on Fecember 3« 



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^uipment and Sup; li s: 



The public address unit which is used in giving the 01 thful Gone 
alks was taken down and brou, ht into Mammoth on November 2. 

We received on November 16, 107 rolls of Ansco lomm colored motion pic- 
ire film which was surplus property and consists of film about one ear out-of-date. 
3me of the film has been exposed and although grainy, seems to be satisfactory in 
feher respects. 

A new model 302C magnetic type l6mm sound motion picture projector was re- 
ived on an indefinite loan basis from the Director's Office on November 9. This 

a very fine piece of equipment and will be most useful in the presentation of 
xr interpretive programs. On November 21 an au\.;resso raph, a large supply of sten- 
Lls, a milling list storage cabinet and other accessories were obtained from sur- 
Lus listing. 

By the months close all property inventories for the Division had been 
Mnpleted and cleared through the Storehouse and reports submitted to the Board of 
jirve;/ on lost and damaged property. 

i oto^;raphic and Visual Aids] 



On November 1 pictures were made of the Ca o i evelopment so that prints 
Duld be submitted to the region for their use in illustrating a report on the 
CSSION 66 progress • On November 15 six photographs were taken of Superintendent 
arrisonj these were processed and 8x10 enlargements were made and turned, over to 
r. Jof e on the ljth so that newspapers near Yellowstone would have pictures of 
c. . arriEon'for use in news articles concerning his arrival in Yellowstone. 

During the month considerable darkroom work was done by Park Naturalists 
vers, Seal and Condon. A total of some 700 kx$ contact prints -were made and 57 
kIO enlargements were made and six iix5 film packs were processed. In addition to 
le darkroom work 600ft, of l6mm colored motion picture film was exposed and two 
\% exp. K135 rolls of film exposed. 



A large collection of black and white ne t ;* bives were received during the 
nth from the on Two Office. These negatives must be carefully reviewed before 
llnj adce-:. to the Yellowstone Photo files. Sets of kodaslides were sent on loan 
illiam Bugas of Houston, Texas and Arthur Nash at Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



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David de L. Condon 
Chief Perk list 

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Superintendent, Yellowstone lark Jauuar.y 8, 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly Report for T ecember, 1956 
S pecial Activities .. ferences 






Park Naturalist Heal appeared on the i :en dri 

as a witness on De< or 5« . ogan was com LOO. ■ on one 

char: e ai 10.00 on t^e cth- r. 

A special meeting was hel< ' ' t 5 

witn Superintendent Garrison, Park Engineer '.owe, rchitect Prank attson, 

Assistant Superinte emilton and Park naturalist tg» At tnis 

time the amphitheaters at i and Mammoth we , ree&ent was 

reacned on the site for the amphitheater at >een ar- 

rived upon at trie month's elo^e for the location of the amphitheater .it ( 

A conference was ■ L< i ith the jrintendent and other - 

on Tecember 5 with respect to tne Interpretive Develc . alar 

staff meet: scember 6. '<.■ i a' 

CI b neetii win.ston with t the 

park on December 17 • 

1st LI rickson, former park ran er laturalist stopped in for a 

visit at the museum en December 13. 

Relit; io us Services and ., \ el Use 






The regular . I i chool services were held each Sun ■.! low- 

stone Rational Park Chapel at 10:00 a.m., and tent church ser- 

vices were held at 11:1 . . on all \ s except ices 

were held. I lal Christmas 5ve Vesper Service w^s hel even! 

ember 2u at 6:30 p.m. ! r« obert Thomson, trie re; lister, c 

Bervices. 

A special memorial service was held in j Hows tone "'ational Park 

at 3:00 p.m. on Tecember 23 in memorv of rs. Alice . I -. s. Kitta sed 

awa,v in tne hivin ston ' emorial Hospital on e wife of Biolo 

i. r . it tarns. The service vaa cor.- cter o ert ' 

■ the v. , n i of the Livin ston lurch. 

Studc t inicter hobert Thomson left - t on a vacation 

to da .c ie in Canada id act returned by the 's close. 

' -Service Training; 



The Int vision continued to be the 

Yellowstone s sheet. 


















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Clerk- J Pi r Shirley Van Gilder tool 
the period I'.ecembor 22 to January 2. Park 
except for h hours sick leave taken on December 10. Park 

all month. Park "aturelist on usee 
month. 

On .' ". 18 t enm L ristmas 'iewe letter of the 
. to former seuecaal park ranger aat lints 
ti . 

I u t e rf r ■-.: 1 1 v e ^'erv i ce & 

Park Naturalist Tyera presented an evenin 
Ion tc leaders in 

.1 at ' rdiner on t g of December 28. 
this si oop on an all-di Lei arij Llowst< 

elk range area on the 29th a; id that evening, in the 

with a pro ovies - leral . n on 

December 30, took this part 2 hour tr ammoth 

The .a ver. i eptive party i 
Eton, 

Park Natural! t leal presented a motion \ L< on Vaterfowl Co tion 

to t th school children on Dec< U4. 

a tc res of Yelloi ... ion on . On 

1 13th he presented a bone Park Masonic Club. 

Earl;: in the month ail the and 

covers placed over them for t - ./lance of J . ■•: . as on the 

porch of t covered with t 

weather. 

A study skin oi wan was 1 - 

and collection and a full life-SJ 

through the ^'ellovstcne Library an »um Assoc' 
added to the Kammot rum eolleetio » 
pared b Lentfer Brothers in Livingston. In add bo thii 

: In has also been added to the sti collection. 

Research a. id Gbservati' M 

The Interpretive ! evelcjment Outline was Park 

Ratui and reviewed by nembere of the Interpr on and re of 

tne Superinte dent's staff, end then prepared in final 






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The final copies were typed by Clerk-Stern d were 

submitted to the Superintem or his recommendation and approval dssion 
to the iie-t iorial Cffice for review and approval on 20. Park Naturalist 

re, using the rough cory, prepared the fin i pied coy \ of the Interpretive sion 
map. 

On the trip with the scouts on .:>er 29 Park saw 8 

-tes, 5 bull buffalo, near Soda Butte, 1 bull b stal rous b 

of elk, 

A copy of tie diary of Mrs, L. ; . Shephard who visited fellows tone in 
was sent to us by Mr, T. . lear< . a. reported see" 
eeleior Qeyeer in eruption in her diary and if :cr deecriptie ct, her 
evidence indicates a later eruption of this lan that normally d to 
which is 1888. 

Library 



Turin.- the month considerable time w< tit reviewing the c: 
lark files and from there was selected a lot of material which, in all j robability, 
should be added tc the "ellowstone Park Reset. i ■ rary, • quantity of 
material was brou : ht to the museum and is stored in the libra time 

will permit, items of impori s selected for use in the library. 
also planned to nave the Association's librarian devote some of her time to 
review of these materials. 

The following is an account of the use of the library for the month of 
i , 191 i 

Boeka n ceived . . . , . , 2 

a I .vines • • • . • ,3 

Pamphlets • ,h 

Books in Circulation, .......91 

Books O: inite Loa i. 121 

;cl History Association 



On T^ecember 3 the Association nailed out the Kay, June - July, i 
issues of Yellowstone lark ■lature N otes an< Q sr 31 t! .'led out the 
September, October and November, December issues, r o treble time of the 
bers of tne rivision was devoted to multilithing,asaembling, an< -in t 
four issues for maili . ithethe mailing of these Issues on December 31, it < 
tes the series for 19> • 

Park Naturalist : ; eal spent considerable time carefully r« the two 
books ,: in Vonderland" and "Cubfcy Returns" • A long letter itemizing >sted 
ehan(;es in the two books were sent to Hrs« Frances r. 

iMrs. Fc-rnsworth anticipated publishing a revised edition of the c rid it was 
thought that tnis was an on ortunity to bring the text of the bocks mere in 

with tne facts about bears and also the policies of the Service with 
respect to wildli.e and its enjoyment. 



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During the period that the Nature Votes were being multilithed, the 
Association also ran off 1j500 blank newsletter heads. Earl in the month of 
ecember a collection of tape recordings of ids in Yellowstone were 

seit on loan to I r. Gerald A. Sterbutsel and these v 

of the month, Mr, Sterbutzel is going to use t ises 

for tne motion picture of Yellowstone which he is preparin • 

^qfij-mont <. ■ d ,'u: , lies 



All during the month of Tecember small quantities of the stationery 
BUj. lies ordered the 1st of June nave been i 

dc and V is al i -:\ s 



neiderable darkroom work was done 
t fifty 8x10 ; lossy enlargement* were ru . cial 

iork wea one for the Eh| Sneers in pre is for use 

arts and some picture! were made of the t enic tables in use in -.rk 
at the present time. 

ree reels of motion picture film and a projector we 
tebinFon for use while on annual leave La* 

A selection of negatives on subjects which t ion in 

;he Director's office in Washington wants photc ed werethe 1956 year were made. 
rhese are being sent as soon as another one-half dozen the 

collection. 

Park Naturalist Tyers has devoted the #ajcr part of his time during Decern- 
>er to detailed work on t <e kodaslide collection and t e serv eld 

lets cf slides which are used in the Interpretive programs. 



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UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

(Park or Office) 




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PLEASE RETURN THIS FILE PROMPTLY TO 



MONTHLY REPORTS, NATURALIST DIVISION 



1957 



(Activity) 



IMPORTANT 

s file constitutes o part of the official records of the 
al Park Service and should not be separated or papers 

awn without express authority of the official in charge. 

icials and employees will be held responsible for 

■ to observe these rules, which are necessary to pro- 

te integrity of the official records. 



FROM: 


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Superintendent, Yellowstoue Park 

Chief Pa: ir&list 

Monthly Report for Janiu , L957« 

Special Activities and Conferences 

The Chief Pi attended staff or squad meet n the 

following dates* January 2, 3, 7, 9, 10 and 31, He also atts eetinf of 
the Safety Committee on January 23 and a meeting of I Committee on 
January 2 . 

Tne montul. report for the division was prepared and sub on 
January 8, On Jar hief lark Naturalist r the 

ent plans with Landscape Architect r t , .:'■. 
cussed the need for observation platforms at the brink of the Lower Falls, 

Park Naturalist Beal spent considerabL thorou 
set of Administrative Manuals in the Interpretive Division and brouj ht 
these uj. to date making a check of all revii Lone and change; 

: t i ; ous Services a:i; r el jse 

The Yellowstone Rational Park Chapel was use or the 

regular Sunday School services at 10:00 a.m. rdiner- >th winter 

ministry church services were held in the Chapel each at 111 15 a.m. 
J. Josei nine Learner conducted the services on January 12 

Rev, Warren V. Oct conducted a communion service in conjunction with the i 
service which was handled b Stude Ister Obert . on, 

, i ren V/, Cst, Director of A Christian Ministry in the 
jnal larks, arrived in Yellowstone on January 11 and remained until Uith. 
On the afternoon s 11th and the raorni f the 12t: , 

- chairman of the Sup< fc'i dttee mat ten .o the 

■ent Mini.ntr - in llowstone National 

On the evening of January 11 a comb; /bees for 

a student ministry in the summer and for a wintei itryj.n Gardiner ani 
was held in the Conference Room of the Barracks Build ■ , 

conducted the meet in? and a fine representation -sibers wer< nt. 

The main pnapose of the meeting was to arrive at a d on as to i 
should attempt to obtain to serve as a student minister at 1 diir' 

the 1957 season and who would remain on as the r< ; - minister at 
the winter of 1 - , The in recommended by Rev. Oi , • 
Speed who has served as student minister at r eath 

Valley National 'onument. The combined committees v v. ( 

for Mr, Speed to function in that capacity. 



In-Service Training 

The Mechanical Rivision, tin , ♦ son, e in- 

service trai ••-' on Friday, January 18 at ltOO p.m. There wer> 

in attendance and three lomm motion pictures were shown. These were prov 
by the ' aterp illar Tractor Company. One was on t a of a patrol r, one 

on a Caterpillar front-end loader and the last film was a safety film on safe 
driving practises* The Interpretive ^ivision contl is- 

1'ite the Yellowstone Weekly News. 

Personnel 



Chief Park Haturalia : on was on ' 

annual leave taken on January U. Clerk-Steno Lrley er was on 
duty all month except for 10 hours sick lei en on the 29th and 30th. 

Naturalist Tyers was on duty all month except for ' lual leave taken on 
Jann 1 ■ eturaliat Beal was on ■ bh. 

Interpretive Services 

Park Naturalist Beal worked uj the nual Report ^o. 

8a3 on Information and Interpretation. This report was c submil 

on January 21. 

Park list Con; .'on completed arrangements to attend t tool of 
Public Administration at the University of Montana where he will present a pro- 
■ on February 12, As ; art of his trip a program will be presented to the 
lub en Februar. 11 and to the . . '.£., Local c. 65 on February 13. 

Chief Park ' i I List o on j resented a program to the Livingston 
Kiwanis Club on Janua . There were 20 men appre- 
ciate the pre ental on Yellowstone in 

n Wiley, Director o tamber oi ■ - - cussed park problems for some 

time with the park net t. On Jt 9a set of geology reference books 

dealinp with Yellowstone geology were sent to Dr. Low use 

in the presentation of a seminar course c Llowstone reology at t 
of Texas. 

A set of 980 kodaslides which were on lo;; r. . . , crd 
Automobile dealer, on, Texas were ret\ >n January 22. 

made use of these slices in presenting a seriei colored television pn 
The movie, "V, ; ild Animal heaven" is on loan to r. . : . lfer and the movie, 

t-ers, Kudpots and Pools" was loaned to r. rank I aw. Both 
were used to j resent prorreras of an Inter] nature deal* bh eliow- 
stone. 

useum Activities and Exhibits 



rini the first 1 art of the month the r a Divia Line 
for "e ; lowstone was ted and accomp< B an inter eveloj 

map showing the locatiort of proposed sxhibits, interpretive markers and intcr- 

tive structures. The j Ian, as submitted, was approved bj the 
and transmitted tc ostern Office of Design an< ruction. 






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All study collections of birds, nerbariurr en a m 
proof inp treatment during the month by Park Naturall t Tyera. 

Research and Observations 

Place Nsme proposal forms vere eo or 3h unnamed ft 3 by 

the months close and a memorandum covering the transmittal oi' these forms will 
be prepared earl" in February and they will be submi o the director 
approval and submission to the . . oar< on mea* Park 

Beal made a trip t I lows tone on Janua E for the >se of observinp 
and photographing the oversnow equipment demonetisations. At that time he made 
motion pictures, still pictures ar ■ operati< 

Park Naturalists Condon . material for the 

n;w Information booklet on Yellowstone* Chief lark list Condon bed 
a detailed memo ran- urn covering suggested s in this mater 

We also submitted a ;iumber of 8 x IX) glossy enlargementa which it was supi ested 

t be better for the illustrations in the booklet than the pictures which 
accompanied the text from the firector's Office, This work was com; 
28th of Janui • 

Fark Naturalj ers spent the 28th of January in t : observing 
the elk management operations and pictures of this work. On this dati 
observed a large bull moose in the vicinity of Tower Junction wl: its 

antlers. Park on made trips into eld on the 13th, 19th, 

and 26th, 27th for the purpose of observii: life under winter is, 

A lar; e flock of Redpolls were observed r ra on 

January 22 and on several occasions during thi e flocks of Hepburn's 

Rosy Finches and also Bohemian Vvaxwings were observ th area, 

Pfc t le&l cc d 12 algae samples from the 

Lng Terraces on January 28 a ose were sent to Dr« Paul A. L of the 

Haskins Laboratories in *)ew York. . Zahl will use the al? v.&e cultures in cancer 
research studies, 

Iar< list Beal reports a kingfisher using the < below 
the Powerhouse as its winter resident. The cold weather of Januai 
30 froze up much of the creek t Heated life is bir . 

Natural list Ion 

Arrangements made through the Association made it possible 
obtain 28 ski parkas for local employees durin month. These were obtai 
and delivered to park personnel by the months close and were purch* the 
Sportcaster Corporation, Seattle, 

A great deal of work has been 1 n associi-tic: 

durin;; the month of January, Park Naturalist onaiderab] 

to the cos^plete cueck of property records, j urchases, etc, of the association 
to tieterjiine the r. te invi of association its value. 

Cards have been made up on these values and tne will reciated within 
future ..-ears in keepinp with the recomnendat ons m&de b the Boarc ,. * 



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A ci • ical inventor y was made book sto< the 
associate all of those records wore the; L and a rts 

ared on the \9 l j>> fiscal ; ear operations, 
of Ti rectors a te association was held in t List's Of Lee 

January- lit with the following directors present! ill • Bealj Alia 
t, Jack . g nss | Jose. , - , - , Jf« 

astoch and . ■ . ■ airman Werrei •. e Lite was absent 
because he was in Ran Francisco on assignment* • •■ auel A. 

. crs vers invited as guests, Mr. Tyera and . ; rison were elected to 
membership on the board at the msetin . tutes f< leted 

b tlie months cIoon i in tht ds. ss- 

ful one and following it the annual report of n was submitted to 

the Kegional or af Region IT to 1 ' Lee. 

On the afternoon of Jj L Assist a it Kelt Ison 

of '-©Semite National Park called the executive secre Llowstone 

Library and Assoc; as ti er or not tion 

would be in a position to purchase 12 lots 1 towns ite in Yosemite Fatioi 

fcr the purpose of assist; emite to acquire private in- 
the park. ? embers of the V. tors were contacted and it was agreed 

b. unanimous vote of trie board members to. . . . • this 

land acquisition. Mr. sileon was so advil Lt is antici- 

pate . this tra-isactioii will be com} let. . 

Clerk- ley ?a L er and Park Naturalist Beal thor- 

ou, ov: r the rellowst .. ' List arid re- > rom 

that list those na*nes of in als who have not aair. 

The Telle searcl Libri 
useful in tro. .ion for a 

especial! in rt ta. T 

Librj the ,15^?! 

oks c calved • 12 

1 nes • • 

>t hleta 

Books in laticn. .102 

Hooks on Ir be loan. • • . •• 

Equipment c, '. : t lies 

Turin,: the month Park Naturalist 
1 ;n motion picture j rojectors. In <. : 
feioner I i wei^e order in 

ap hic I j ~: £• 

epart of ■ .rkroom work ae 

and 111; 8 x 10 enlargements we i e as well as a i 



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: n£ the month thirty-six U x 5 black and white nc a were expos 
developed. There was also 800 feet of aasco cole 1.1m ex f winter 
scenery, wildlife and opera* ' i . te roll of 35nm colored film was expoi . 

Park \ T aturalist Tyers devoted 132 hours of wo -'■ time to the 
catelo . inj , classifying, bin id lai- - Lnal kodasl: 

for inclusion in the original file of jictures used for park interim on. 
Sets of ■ ;eee now cri will be selected and duplicated for Lon to all 
of the field sets. 

A set of sixteen 8 x 10 gloss prints of Yellowstone subjects were 
sent to the editor of \ Ifidoa line for considerat p use in a 

forth cm:' ic of that publication on : ;ati s* 

3 1 litted, 



fav 

chief Par] list 

Condon 

file 

museum .■' 

cc 

PCondon/svg 



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NMrlattttteat 

"3f Park Naturalist 

Monthly heport for Febn. , 1957 

o : r\'\ - •■■ '■ ( „ 

Some time was srxsnt rev and 

a memorandum on this subject was submitted on mts 

of members of the division. The Mission 66 brief Lao m ents 
oarnifij ere submitted for considx n. 

Park list C< , , of 

two days wor] xpenditun 3rd 

of the 1 57 fiscal year. 

On 7 Personnel Officer Harold :ky frc al 

Office visited the museum and t considerable diseussion v 

respect to personnel matters as thej affected service in general. 

The Chief Park list attended s 

of staff members on February 7, 15, 20 arid 26th, ;.lr. Cordon ■ 1 a 

meeting with the i^anagement Review on 3 . ttee meet- 

s were attended by the C uralist ..nth, 

b; Chairman J off i 
on February 7, . ourne 

at park ht rters for about 15 minutes on the 131 • 

the Management I.eview Team out 
Condon, on February 9, made a trip te Yello 

son, ; or - 

of joining the Kan t >o m on a trip to vi. 

did not tiie represent at! v ce 

beyond the 7-Mile bridge in the 

Lie in Missoula on February 11 and 
taoted the Speec nivera >neernJ of 

their pertici nation in the present ant on 

conferred with the Forestr; >ors concern^ 

which posing for a new de conservation 

Forestry School, Dean ' illiams of the Forestry 
Bole part.. 1 in the discussions, 

I-eli vices and Chaoel Use 



chool services ware 
Jterk Chapel I lorning at IOiOO a,m, 

I services were held 1»15 * . . ob 

;e services. 






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Jn-..orv: ? r : *lgg 

The In-Service Training 
consisting of Ciiie:' I , . , 

, bert . . 

relist Di . ! eb, 

7, . activ 

tection Division and e revl 

on devi I on the desJ ty of 

and reporting local trainin 
forra be designed if possible to e-. 

at e figure re pre 302 " 3 -one 

'.oyoes while on Job. It 

of all en 3 for - tervice 

lnlog and the .'. oca to the Individ, ployee x- 

perience. 

Park Natur 
bei: ducted roteetion Division on . , . , . 

Natural i. 1 spent consider inistr _, ■- 

for-nati- n manuals and the field manual for museums. 

The Interpretive ued tc te the 






Chief Pr 1 'on was on duty all aonth urs 

annual leave taken on Fe^ . ,eal ws th 

and Park Natuj Tycrs wis on duty all month, CI;.. - 

"or wcs also on duty all month, y 7 a len teld 

•raancnt Staff eoncen 3 >nal 

person; .el dui e 1957 se son, 

Mr. B, J, Reneher from his position ?:•.. , -4, . .1, 

Jes:ie liornbaok 1 I in at ff ice 

making . ;n, 

r '•.■;: ,-rvices 



On February 1 . . brey L, aince 

Pat f ice and a lengthy dieeua Ld on the amphitheater 
uding the settl , .; eircu: 

ncerned with Lannin struct! 
ndon gave ti^e following 

,th 
'•roer*8 Lnion 

Lion»s Club ula 

School Of i ib3 

Ad Missoula 

Public and Ctudent 

Body of !£,:.. U. soula 



7 

Fe 

Fe 11 

February 12 

Fe; 



20 



A • '3 report on tho research wor 

"r .'tag© was receiv la the aed in ti.e Y bone 

research 1 • '4r, Arnitage is oeJdfij 

the Yellorbellied itarm . 

e time w : ted to the review 

aafckin Bannock Izxlii Taarker 

• lett. Sr. DpI on Fe< 

A small arrowhead wi;S del Ined as a si 
of t 11 and tr.e larger arr 

^ebruarj 26 sone tine t In r 

plants selec ; attson for ua< levelc 

arees, ons were *.ede for additional species to be 

and for certain plants which shoul not 

ve to Yellowstone, 

At the beginning of tne month of ;s on the 

Hot Spring Terraces lost its conpleto v< r ater e virti ormant 

throughout the month but at il s clone, a c siderabli 

again covered t rraces. The hot i activity 

Terrace has mowed back alon; rim -of . re ngc 

re it was active 2 years ago. 

Par 
Bio in observing ov rosion on tl> 

>ne elk ran e« Bei 1 r« x ■ -■ \ : " 
plants in s- a , tested snow 

quite nurasrouB on *e slopes*, but we: o still quits 

cent rsduot . ffalo wsr seven , a 

ast of the I« 
group of 63 nerr Crystnl Creek. 

,e and ether 1st nt. locations," 




During t .th a number of 

fork re Be rary and Mr* ber- 

joons gather! for studies which he 

it Mont- ?v tate Co 

The folio s an account i of 

February, 1957j 

Books receive*! *......... •...• 

Magazines* 

Pcnohlcts 9 

Books in Circi. ,110 

Books on IndAf ini te 












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Un February 19 the Yc tion sent 

ant of 11080.00 to e of 

purchasir lota in the fi I en In - rk. The 

later:, 'on will m 

Libr 
this land will become lent property and pti-t of 'ark. 

oayrae; 36 lots was tao coop n of the 1eT. 

Library an! ;n 

of r-:v I bol within t . oc. 

will be repaid their \ • >lete tj asscc<r:te" 

w: "er has been finished, wni in 

58. 

The annual a Yellowstone Libr on 

e Collector of Internal Revenue was 

e first shipment Bis booJ receive-} on 

^ebru: ry 15, Gobies of t ry 

>f Congress f - r e< ..right, the >irector, ' 

copies were sent to . Copies wi 

;o t ig&slne, agazine, the 

,ivin, stcn nterorise for ex; 

. . ' o close no v. : cs 

id been 3ent except v e 

.ivi^ rise, 

e association pure kodallidee o 

ive pgogram from t rican Museum atui ind . aul eoMt of 
>o1cj , . It is ant 

aumber of bird slides fr :tslide dealers in order 1 of 

lie is oaterlal will 1 :.ved. 

. ..-: -;' '.. ' L'i ■ : -c "'■-' ■■ . ■-..■• r 8«t tc . rly 

ind w<: s revi sod b f . rbhs close had been sent to the 

lhaelwrlghi Lithoprlnters in Salt 
K>ssibility of orlnting 20,000 copies, 
record form for use in ko association' 

'ora was filled out in detail and all i rds of bion brev 

,o date. 

iUip.-x-nt ■-. x/i l. ... lej 

During m was rnade of the i "' 

ipefationa and an order «i .eral aerv 1. 

'■'-■--' .- ' ■:■ ■ . - : -. 

Considerable time was spent or i on 

knd 72 4- x 5 ne were developed; 3 rolls of ts 

jiere ratde. In ad 15 tion to this wor. , 4x5 
»nla: {/omenta made* 



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on of 

luri. th to tlu lide collection - bin 

llidcs, classifying and fcitlii ill 

3c used at the field station* unraor. the 

3c. f historical pictures, geol -irts and 

tive material which will be helpful in presently ... 63 

original kodoslides wero selected for - : v; l<3 

sets. 

Respective! itted, 



. ondon 




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In-0erv3ce I 



Park Naturalist Tywn in portion of the trai :>ro- 

gra embers of D1m ich Chief 

sonducted on skiing. Park Naturalists Beal and Tyers participated in the r - 
ger patrol to Can; . , , at Thumb aid Sylvan Pasi od of 

larch 11 through 15. This gave t e practice! background of t! in 
winter as was possible for them t< 

of the d. : ' ter and take aoi i . They were 1 in the use 

of over si/ b« - - loft March 29 to [n- 

iervice train: :.iocl given at Omahu , . 

The . on continued to to the 

llo, v stone uee.,1; . . 



Personnel 



Park - ley 

Van Gilder were all on dui 

ark 
ranger naturalists whom it 

during 1957. They wert i ' sed of -her 
formation concerning plans for the 1957 season. 

had indicated they would re . neeessarj 

for then to resign and no word had been received .To fill 

vacancies, committments were out f ■ . L©r, 

Dr. . Davis, Jr. S ill iam Fisher, . >oi urphy an . rd C. Bowers. 

We still have one position to Till an urne s. 

Interpretive Lorviees 



On the evening of larch 2 the ro- 

gram at the annuel 's Banquet in Gardiner. resent 

and the e of ti 

March 1, 1- 72 when YollovTstone wrs established. 

Dui- .e month a plan . -es 

announcements which would be distributed at 75 points Tor 

the purpose of advising oeoole of t 

to then. The Chief Pal ralists d etin board fc 

of these announcements and Park Naturali i sample . n. 

As part of the interpretive , to 

Dr. Lowell G. Biddulph, Geology Dept., . ... 

Land and Geysers, uhxts ools. 

Two to .roups of 375 and 75 re: volyj Ge-.sers. » ' '.■■ ■ \ __ . 

Two showings to groups of 157 and 75 e# Tw< >nt 

to Dr. Biddulph for use later in the month and d 

Geyscrlsnd in .inter and VlldiAni.u . ven . In addition to these , 



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were sent to r. rt F, Jonas at the Lewis and Clark Normal School of 

Lewistou Idaho. These were wild Ani ■ y : rls of Yellcv/stone^ 

A movie entitled Your Yellowstone nt tu Or. , . lfer of Des ivloines, 

Iowa. These levies verj 1 oretive tools and 

larly received by the audiences where they are shown. 

__. u:. .'ciivJti.es and lacnibits 



Dux -a raonth details were 

would b :jd bet :ike and Canyon d the l c ;57 tr. 

signs will ho lo« a Absaroka Mountain view, 3 dies e Jot,} 

the Le Hardy's Rapids, Hud Volcano parking area, Black Dragon's Caitron, 
overlook bolo. o area, Irout Greek, and at the ' 

site. In addition to the naterlal for one wt.„ 'or place- 

ment at tae Natural 

Dm sketches were 

parking areas between , . gns 

were approved b, arintendent on thi 

the I KS and Region Two Office. Par) - Seal rew >nt 

and development theme rospectug for Bigrxle battle- 

field National 

he setae ... ., ..<..■ . . ■„■ _. L _ d 



on March 2 ip to the 

Norris Geyser Basin and return. ' obon 

liver rrii . te bird... rg 

neck bands, binoculars a number of elk m owept area 

along the top Gain. ral Coyote were seen. return 

trip t:.e lower ond of elope :ing 

on the 
area. Am i ■ ; ib. 

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sorner of 

is. 

I iland Spring on 1 ^.ed 

Lts violent activity on b ^suub e ound. 

:he sinter is flowing heavily th ss 

io the surf i ce at three other . led tr s. 

]>ome of oar to be 200 years or . 

s runnlaj down t and building .ter on 

I s buried the branches of tr< I 3 of 

ravertine. It a beautiful Bprlng, but It 

araage to 1 statlvs covering in t 

it continues its activity 3n 
wo and 1/2 nonths, the loop r 
o be closed to traffic. 



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On March 11 the Chief Pj vided Par. 01 dc 

rchitect Mattson with some infor on net i ts which would be 
a fur use in planting the Canyon Vill 

During the month consider n* in running town in- 

ormrtion on the Trumpeter Swan and their environment in tl 
ission to r. .ins ton Banko. In addition to t ed 

was sent a large number of pictures be useful 

o him In working up his monograph on the Truipeter Swan for 
ildlife Service, 

On the LVth of the mont , Lttams' outline for 

. he will present at the conference train! r 

rid Aorae suggestions made on it. 
A field trip was made to Canyon on March 19 and at that time Artist 
oint was visited and also the Upper Falls on both sides of the Can 
s an ice mass around the nd this had broken off many trees in- 

ze vicinity of the Observation platform, many pictures both blac ite 
colored were Bade of the Canyon area foi urpose of havir . material 
iii for use in the new Canyon Villa sitor Center museum section. Two 
ayote were captures in the deep sn: • nel o, 
sund to trevel easily up to a speed of 30 'idles p 
sar the ial area on Colfatara Plateau, 

On March 20 a set of >ne Travel sl3 \ Id 
Y the Drewry I'hotocclcr Corp* of Ciendale, Calif < ./ere sub itted Cor re- 
Lew and e: . done arai suggej 
Ltles which were in error. 

The large brown color r, locollj called sorter, 

jen hibernating under the Stove shed put in his appearance on March 1. 
>en out sunning himself on occ: r to tl be but c: 

nd circulated around some. By &arch 18 he 
uis and within a limited time tten into considerable mischief in t 
>mnunity. He was trap ;>ed and on tne 29th was released on utof 

lar B landing hill, At the month's close he has not vet returned t- 
last seen in tne vicinity of Apoliinaris S , 

On March 26 the %rk • 
ingestions were made concerning it. 

A field trip was made to the Canyon area on March 31 
•« Kenneth F. Raohen, a pho \\er from Billin , ongand a 

number of oictures were made of t i r Falls and sections of 
te Canyon. An observntion of interest de in I 

dl bu "f alo were approached the: i, telj plm into t stone 
.ver, each of tl Log ec nto 

te rh; r and t:.en coming up swinning across the river then b file 

it of the streem and up the opposite bonk leaving behind i 
l6 snow fr rack which thi tten on t 

ver. One of the bulls oaid no attention at all for it didn't eve er to 



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rivsr althou o -eared to be in 
ition as the four which for some reason bee d. 

la; while watching the ic nd 

sed a heavy wave action in the large pool be hen 

■bergs formed floated down the river i 
uralist Beal end Tyers were able t 

s and made observations on this trip and following to t: 
During the winter patrol the folic, des 

arc i 12, 5 bison in Pelican Valley; iiarc 13, 1 .in 

numb of Yellowstone Lake near \ 
n early roadbed; 3 bison near the hot s on t r 

ary Bay and 1 bison at the east end of rch 14.; a d ase in 

be deep snow along Cub Creek on Ifareh 14; "arch 15, 13 bison in 
irk Lists Tyers arid Beal skied into the 's Caldron oi 

td observed that its activity was apparently undlrain3 7 centralized 
a the s- ots as list fall." 

A series of 20 algae samples were collected on the cos 

I arch 27 by Park Naturalists heel and Tyers. These were collected for 
iuI ; . Zahl of the Raskins Laboratories in New York , use in 

sneer research work* Ihey were shipped to him by air parcel Ln vacuum 
mtainers. 



Mr. James Brown, b. S. ed all 

e legal books in the llbx 

endations which books should ept and w 

rown's memorandum is dat-d March 21* . ? 

s made rather extensive use of the library durln 
an account of t of the library for t , 37: 

Books received , 11 

Magazines... , 

Pamphlets 6 

Books in circulation 115 

Books on Indefinite loan... • • 



tur: 1 .;! -•{•■■■ i r ; elation 



The Yellowstone Library and Museuj 

achine on March 6. Five hundred dollars of the c ine 

supplied as a gift for that jurpose fr judent 'id 
association su ' an additional .'7.10 t< 

Lt and obtain ■upplies to accompany it. . Lewett of , Montana de- 

ered the o and demonstrated to all members of vision 
operat A gave instructions on its use. . 

On arc. 7 the association received the Yello mts book 
e Wheelwright Li t:;oorinters in Salt v. Then « 7500 copies of 



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,his book and of these 4950 are paperbourid end 2550 are clothbound. The totaj. 
:ost of publishing this book hat beer: $14»706*6l making the cost ook about 
1.80 for the pa^erbound and $2.27 fcr the clothbound volumes. The bill to the 

lwright Li thoprinters was paid on March 15. Compliment of the 

ublicntion were cent to I . raw . ;ley, Dr. . . , Jack . 
aynes, Harve; . tork, Dr. Raj J. ion Two office, Director's office, 

Ibrary of Congress and the Dept. of Interior Library. 

The association purchased 2000 Jiff; in two sizes, 1000 

if each size. will a procedure in mailing pub ' ons 

ni it is planned to use tie 1 1 inf crmation desks to mail books which necple 
o net wish to carry with them for the balance of their vacation tr . 
ssoc'- tion has paid for the duplication of s r of 35mm kodachrome 

Xidef and also for the preparation of a large number of black and white positive 
dides of historic L . In addition tc this ti id 

'or the processing of the kodachrome filri which v s been exposed by ti-. 
ind which is being added to the Yellovjstone udio v. on. 

At the month's close a large number .ides were out f on, 

. ,,' . t ,." ...Tolies 



Three screens which had been used for t 
yver to the storehouse for credit and disposal. These screens have been surv 
*or any salvage value which they might 

the no nth Park Mature 11 stsTyers cleaned and re 5mm 

Projection equipment and Park Naturalist Beal 
Jl6mra motion picture equipment. 



.i.c : i ' . -■ . :,-.! ,Md3 



All reels of duplicate motion pictures were 
luring the month, but the sound tx akes need to be c number of t 

re-recorded. 

Nine A x 5 black and white negatives were supplied to Ashton R. C 
hydraulic Engineer, Department of Agriculture, Montana State Co" 
pictures of over snow equipment demonstrated on January 25 > 1957 in tin 
irea of Yellowstone National Park. 

Final work on 30 negatives for the Was ce of 

'ark Service was done early in the month. r on negative 

mvelooea was supplied and! contact prints were mounted on the em 
>rk was cc i on arch 10 and the mater ' od on 11. 

Several rolls of indoor color film were od durj lonth to 
reproduce new slides of 6 old lantern slides of history subjects. 1 
returned frc jessing and are very satisfactory. 
of several other history photos, paintin 

Black and white . ere orde. \ receive- ;toa 

this month and will be added to the hist or. 



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Several rolls of outdoor film were exposed of mounted sped i 
from the Han aseum _: mth. The results have not t been received 
but it is expected the slices will be good . thus increase the number -of 
cies in the bird category of our slide sets. 

Darkroom work was performed on .arc. 20 whoa 4 filmpacks and 4 cut 
film were developed, T.ese represented pictures token during the winter patrol 
and at the Canyon area, and some of the negatives appoar to be v od. 
The 4x5 Lktfichrome film exposed at Canyon was removed from 
and sent in for nrocessing and a number of film holders vere loi 
Q Par. cut film. 

:-ctf ully submitted , 



d de L. Condon 
file CI: oralis' 

nuseum* 

London 
)Condon/svg 



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Superintendent ay 6, 1 

Chief Park Naturalist 

thly Report for April, 1957, 

r '/ . . ." Conferences^ 

The Chief list at to. t 3 in the eoi 

room on April 4- and April l£. Park Nati 

raeetii - 1 18 and at that tine took pictures of Mr. Lee Coleman receiving 
e cash awrrd for a su| on. fepec. 

attended by the Chief Perk Naturalist in the conference room on April. 
April 23. On the afternoon of the 1 1 -. Garrison, . '.ton, ( r , 
Frank hattson, Otto Brown, an-" 1 Condon looked over eater sit 

and went over t ' for t i moth area. ing 

Superintendent Hamilton, Chief Ranger Brown and Park Naturalist Con ' 

cial conference on the coordination of the ranger and naturalist work. Chief 
Park Naturalist Goiidon functioned as acting assistant superintendent from April 
2 to April 14 and as acting superintendent on April 2 and . 

On April 12 Chief Park Naturalist Condon with Superintendent Garrison 
confer? ontana State University Prof. Bert [ansen and Ginnis 
concerning the . t plans for Campfire Day. c April 15 a special sc 
meeting v/as attended in the Superintendent's office. On April 26 Chief Perk 
Naturalist Condon accompanied Assistant Chief r Garry and Mr. and rs. 
:rton to the Old Faithful area. - ton fell on the re? Ider :a 
Gem Pool and bumped her head against the car causing a laceration of «, 

The Chief Park Naturalist Laation charts for the Inter- 

pretive Division durin, aonth. 

■ ■■■'fflous Services and Cnaocl Use? 

e lellowstons national Park Chapel was used I day 

School services each Sunday of the month except Easter , 11 21. 
regular .'rote stent" church services were lie Id in the at 11:15 

a.m. with the exception of Easter Sunday when a speci lle-1: 

vice was held at 6»C0 a.m. There 1 

weather was ideal. 

The Yellowstone Park ^upt.'s Church Committee 
22, at which time they discussed the »n 

ed and moth-proof ed . They also .vent over the in tion ar aor- 
ials to be placed in tne chapel and especially r chapel i book which is to 
be obtained as a memorial to Mr. . . Dunn. The summer's us pr< For 
all denominations was also discussed. On April 24, ituralist, as 
Chairman of the Church Committee sent out letters to t 'cs, Latter- 
Day Saints and Christian tists concerning church schedules. e numb 
of let ere sent to d dry cleani its to i ne what could 
be done with respect tc ;aoth-proofing and cleaning t s in t el. 






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At the month's close r wero beir these istab t 

definite action will be taken in Hay on this aatt( . 

In-;, c x-vi ce -1 ret niuii ; 

Park Naturalist was in attendance at the 11 Goner 
istrative Training Course in Omaha for Region II personnel fr< 
14, He returned tt bh on the 15th. Durii vel to 

<a he 1 to tunit;, t> areas onal 

Park Service and to observe developments there n. 

The Interpretive Division continued tc be the 

YEL< ■ . 2800 newslettc • 1 s were run off for u , 

_; 

t aturalists Condon, Beal and Tyers were all on duty 
Clerk-i3teno. Shirley Van Gilder was on duty all month except for l c > 
re taken on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, of month. 

Early in the month letters offering employment to Drs, Willis Eggler, 
is, and Maynard C. Bowers were sent out. Bowers 5gler declined 

■loyment and Dr. Davis has excepted* Dr. .ill: . Saul res:'' . 

. einer waa selected on April 17 to fill this vacancy. No selectj 
oy created I; r's failure to report. 

Earl; in th< yers' 

were made and these were reviewed with thera on April 17 and their ra1 i sub- 
mitted for review and approv . 

r, Harry Robinson, Perk naturalist of Glaciej 
aking inquiry concern- r 1 Psrk 

Interpretive crviees: 



Park Naturalist Condon gave interpretive 
follows : 

April 11 - Butte Rotary Clubj 130 persons it, 

April 19 - rant Hall and 

April 19 - Mill Creek Hall; 120 present. 

On April 8 fifty 8x10 glossy i ents of Yello rk scenes 
were sent to Mr. Fuqua for use in the preparation of a book on the 
which is annually conducted by the coramuni ston. 



p 



On 15 a committee consisting of fir, Callison 
ardlner, representing the Gardil oer of Commerce, stopp 
tPark Naturalist's office, to discus interpret will bo 

in ftglea Hall during the summer at H»30 p.m. b June 15. 



ements were made for the manufacturing of 72 anr <;nt be 
for use in publisizing tne interpretive pr< ens. 















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The "V.ild Aninal Heaven' on loan to Dr. R. 

Moines Still College, ines, Iowa dur : . . month. was used 

several showings. 

Considerable progress has been ;oade during J ^ th on t 
of the new amphitheater at Mammoth, including the parking area and approaches to 
it. 



Museum Activ. i :k. .. ...its: 



rk Naturalist Tyers -worked up a med Owl skin for the study- 
skin collection. This was found by District Ranger Lee Coleman in th< of 
his pickup and its exact origin has not been determined. 

adison Jet. historical site sign which has been at 1 shburn- 
Langford-Doane campsite was turned over to Sign • ' for t 

construction of a new one. 

A fox skin which has been tanned by the Lentfer Taxidermists of Living- 
ston was added to tne study-skin collection and r sp 

display in tne display cases in the Mammoth : use. ApriJ ists 

3eal and Tyers. 

Park Naturalist Tyers i it considerable 
pishing the self-gulling nature trail labels and 1? Lders. Tner in 
good condition for use during the 1957 season. turalJ it con- 

siderable time durinj the month accessioning and cataloginj , 

historical, and ical items. were 217 s catalogued ate 

secessioni I . Six rock specimens were sent tc 

in the mo of an exhibit on rocks ks. 

Itesearch and Observation: 



On April 4, Lynn Gillett, a small . 
own a Mountain liluebird which ntly suffered a severe electri ock, 
The bird had its wings and part of its taJ rs burned to black cinders a d 
nany of the re on the body v/ere badly singed. It ound i wer 
Dole where high tension litres were pi t. It wi f .ive for t . hnfi 
the effect of the burns and captivity were such that it died. 

n a field tr t tf s and Coo 

Upril 7 there were 17 large bull buffalo along the Soda la 

Jutte and two large bull noose were observed in the insect f irk 

Naturalist Condon. 

Tne Mammoth Hot Spring Terraces were checked several times duri . 
nonth and the changes wliich have occurred and which are occurri; 
iinusual interest. The s nas been a pronounced change and shift in the activity 
sn Main Terrace with a i<eavy flow of water on tl i nt to the ter 

riowinj into large depressed areas ai beautiful pools. 
3f tuose pools are frecturi sracks 3 fe 

?r more wide in many places. i tj at a S oontinu be 

3pcctacular and a large toIu .* water is floi ure and 

Ln several i-thor places. At four of s, a ru trees have been and 









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are bein ; killed by the suffocating effect of the hot ■ • 1 6 a new 

goring was observed as it mm into being on t and Terrace on 

April 7 a considerable deposition of travertine and development 
as present in the spring. A return to that area on April 13 and L4 revealed 

extensive deposition and an abund: at I of algae in the hot ; . ril 

S, western bluebirds, western robins, red-shnfted flicker*, killdeers ite- 
' sparrows were observed on t ighland Tori ace area. In ion to 

these, there were four different species of flowers in bloom. 

Early on the morning of April 11, the Usprey were observed on the lower 
Gardner liver and apparently had returned to their nest site on or that 
late. 

On a field trip to Old Faithful on April 25 by atural: oal 
and Condon an abundant display of wildlife was observed. re 35 elk in 
the Terrace Spring area and 15 at t on Jet. in frost ma, 

the valley about two miles there were an additional 27 and bed wit 
were 5 bull bison. On a email pool a pair of Trumpeter Swan vera! 
Geese were observed. re four bi errace : 

In the Lower Geyser 3asin thermal , 

Fountain and Clepsydra Geysers had been actively < nd ere 

still in an active phase. 

A large number of bear tracks were observed in the vie 
Geyser Basin and the theraal features in this basin i 
but there is a great deal of cleanup work that al ct to 

t vicinity including names carved in the s of 

rubbish which should be picked up. There - .ice at th 
den near Gem Pool fehat the bear has periodical 

den. The Giant Geyser has not erupted at all duidn ber months. There 
is a great deal of evidence that one of the features in the C 

been erupting violently during ' nter months and that it - arently still 

doing so. It was reported later in trie mon 
actually floo , a road near the Riverside parking area. 

A bone which is probabl bone of 
sinter in this Chain Lakes area and had apparently been uncov ve 

action oT the violence of the eruptions which have been takini . • 

ing on Go, ' I erupted du.\ ie winter and cc 
been thrown out of its vent. Giantess Geyser lias apparently thin 

the last two months aid evidence around ' vo indie* 111 

in an active phase srupte . otto • in- 

cluding the Grotto Fountain Geyser has been active all winter. 

Another trip was taken to t I . iful ares on th by 
Naturalist Condon in c >r Garr; . arton. 

At this time the White Dome and Great P on. 

Sand ,-ane were observed near lymph Lak« iber of 

also seen. From Mammoth to the : ^->ct Geysej Ln notes indicate t > fol 
ing elk were set 












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■servoir area (Mammoth) 27 

'lata back Terrace Mtn. -19 

Clear Water Spring! 5 

Nymph •••- — 7 

Pond- 5 

Norria - 17 

Gibbon Meadows————— — 3 

foelow)- 4. 

Terrace Spring 39 

Madison Jet. -17 

H rce Or.)— — 11 

Fount 93 

Firehole Loop ■ -11 

■ /ay——— — — — — — — — — 5 

Biscui t £6 sin- -17 

sin— — — — — — —1;^ 

Total 

3 the - ffiiJLo calv . 
-stle Geyser and one near the . 

i proved tc 

fit. mule deer in the er Basin, cross ■ 

hole River near t- reyaer . 

iuralist Condon whistled to the deer i 
Geyser for 

action was due undoubtedly b„ : re to 

influence the s:< r basin and 

also t o winterkeepers have 1 

On April 27 :.d tri 

tion end at that tine observ - !ng 

ie saw one Golden Eagle ea , killde< . 

d on t ;>- 

served Grot , ..uttercupe flowers in bloom. On trip 

to the Lamar Valley w.- i d && buffalo were seen near Ci 
i were observed four new- o vos. 

On April 20 Chi Ott< srved two Canada G 
orange neckbands on t Lver about two 

le by 
Fishin. , : .led a verj ! . ner- 

vations were made in t rea a" 

mile north of Trout Greek. to observe Co 

a rather interei 5S of . . 

with three 2- about . 

area feeding on the ptasaei a.r: : 

p on t ts and 

ly tti of Canada e e 
graze. dr of Sandhill Crane : 

ce carried on. 
on and Buff le* 

•s were on the oppoeit ' 

Finches flew ir. to feed for a few min . te 












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side a river and aroused considerable interest on the part of t 

ber: ly # In addition to these animals there ware 'falo in 

t on the opposite side of . op or- 

tiaa to see wildlife in the aona the ground was 
green food was starting to come for the animals ui . 

Tv*e several large uull elk who have been 
f ian ioth bare new antlera in the velvet v. 11 over 

still several bull elk in the Upper . Basil: 

ntlers, 

frlbr. :-.v : 



Mr. John Heaneberger, Park .: in on 

Ipril 4 and iae of the Yellow st . 1st 

tyera took in out to tne FisbJ . Sen 

n the 6th. 

t.e Yellowatone Libz on pur 

se in the library and ii Ice bo< tied: 

_ cntributicn to t:;e Heril >. 

lor ace . tenth* 

a folic La an account bh of 

I, 1957s 

Books received/ 

^ines/ 24 

Pamphlets/ , 1 

Books in Circulation/* 117 

Books on Indefini i n/ 

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arr; sbinaon of Glacier ordei 

lothbound "Planta of Yellowstone Park" on I. . lice • 

sd by tne association as clerk tent considerable t 

1. All of the bock orders 
he month. At 's close a large portion 
een received incli. 40 rolls c c maps, 

ook stock wa eal and ;^rs. 

ood publication Bale a busi 

A lar^e nui. . 

luplication and these ',7ei-e receiv . 

lulpmc-r. lies; 

:il 15 the Inter . 3ion t 

ng I on transferring to then a 4*5 -oeed- 

Buri-e ft Jajata Grover wiew eaiaora . oil ell 

iinm motion i sent to the Bell 

or hall. 









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In the darkroom there were 2 rolls of 616 film, twelve 13 x 7 cu 
and twenty* r U x 5 cut films developed. In addition tc 
4 x 5 contact prints mode, eij hteen 616 prints and - 

made. 

Park Naturalist Tyers spariT several days durd nth 
kodaslide field sets for use in the interpretlv 
new slides added to each of the field sets and all field se1 
order for use during the 1957 sr . . re now 1100 sli ' 
sets. 

Park Natural ' »nt considerable time working on over 10 
of newly exposed 16 cture film; inspecting , c 

on stock reels for future use. 

Respectively submit . 



David de L. Condon 
Chief aturali.;t 



cc} Condon 

file 
museum' 
cc 
DCondon/svg 






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Saperintendent, Yellowstone Park June i, % 1957 

Acting Chief Park Katurslist 

Monthly Report for toe SSonta of Uay, 1997 

lltll aJttfrflilfal 1MB leTflTirrT 

On Bay 1 the Chief Park Naturalist spent the better part of the tfay re- 
viewing the Hayae's Guidebook with Mr* Jav4i ■ aynee aid suggest J »« c<*rreOvtiona 

and outages. 

Chief Park Naturalist Gondoa attended staff aeeiirge on the 2nd and 
apeeial meetings on the 7th, 10th and 23rd. Qa May 2 ttr« Garry 1 owe and Tea fc^de 
were shown the seasonal naturalists quarters below the hill and also examined 
the rest root wnich has gone unused in the eaapgrcuad* ecial aeao- 

randua was subnitted along with the new Yellowstone Park snap asking coooents on 
eorrections sod changes which aigat be nade in that siap* Mr* Lowell Adaas of the \ 
Fish and .1 Id life Service was in on the XTth r. sturaliet Tyere accompanied 

hia to the Trout Creek dump where they obt* deturss of the grisslies. Ibr* 

Tyars otherwise helped ttr. Adaae and on the 13th and 20th the Chief Park natural la* 
provided hia with soae help and information* Mr* Adaas left Yellowstone ca the 
21st. 

Kiss £liaabeth Kushaan was in tn* Oaief Park raXieVa office ea aay 

20 to dJseuaa the Student Conserve tie u rogran and at last tiae a oomaittaent was 
aade to provide thea with guidaaoe on an orient* tion trip on Assist 7 and ' . n 
£ay 25 Superintendent Garrison a*jd /ark naturalist Coadon net with Ur« Bert Hansen* 
Raloh aoGulnsss and Koss Miller of the Montana State University for tna purpose of 
reviewing the plans for the pageant to be presented in September at tne aeene of / 
the oaapf ire et ^sdlson Junction* 

BiaW9wf <™\OM WA ttfijgff* Vftf 

The 'iellevstone National Park Chapel was used for Protestant religious 
sarviaes each Sunday aoming st 11 i 15 a.m. with the Studs. star 

aondueting the service* OB May 19 a special congregational nesting was held a 
the regular church service* 

The last regular Sunday School service was held in the chapel on Hay 19 
and the Sunday School will re-convene next f«ll» 

Qa the evening of lay 19 the Yellowstone National Park Chapel was Used 
for ftfef baccalaureate eervieea cf the uardlnar High School* Ur* i ooert Thoaaon* 
the student minister, conducted the service* Oa May 21 the drapes in the chapel 
were taken down end delivered to the cleaners wiierc ware cleaned* They were 

returned to the chapel and re-hung on : *^ 29* The rugs will be cleaned const! as 
aftfcr ai?!«Septc aber« 



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Tr-ftrYlwr Tmlftlwr 

Park Naturalists Beal awl Tycrs participated in port of tha Spring 
Ranger Conference whioh wss conducted from an? 13 t trie 24th. Park iatia 

liat Condon presented on* part of tiiat training program on tfrie 13th* Members i 
tha Interpretive Division projected a nuabar of training films during the con- 
ference • 

Tha Chief Park Naturalist prepared in roufht draft form, an itinerary 
for tha training program for tha seasonal ranger force. This trainiiig program 
will be conducted June 17 through tha 20th, and as soon as topic assignments ha 
been completed, it will be mimeographed and distributed* 

Park Naturalist Beal was on duty all month* Park Naturalist Tyers wa 
on duty all month except for annual lenve taken May 28 and 29 and tha holiday a 
tha 30th* Park itaturaliat Condon vaa on duty all month except for 9 hours of 
annual leave taken on iiay 23 and 31* Clerk-: stenographer Shirley Van Gilder was 
on duty all month* 

The tours of duty for ?ark Naturalists Beal and Tyers were changed to 
lieu days which permitted a permanent nan to be on duty on Sundays and ; atur 
each week* 



tha personnel for the Interpretive Division was selected and coamlttme 
were made for all jobs* Mr* Karl Davenport, Richard P* Sorrel and Ldon Jenkins 
ware selected for laborer janitors* Mr. Thad Gtevena entered on duty :.iay 20 at 
tha Mammoth Museum and Ted Parkinson entered on duty at uld Faithful the 27th* 
Alma L* Teuscher entered on duty at Fishing Bridge on Say 31 and ldon Jenkins 
entered on duty as a janitor in tha Mawaoth Huaeun the 27th of -ey» 



The printing of interpretive program aimounoomenta was arranged tiirough 
tha lellowatcne Library and Museum Association during tha month* These pre cram 
announceraentt will consist of six different Interpretive headings mhich will be 
used at different stations and six apace s tor announcenenta of activities at 
stations, or if there are not this many activities some "quotable uctes" will 
be used* There will be 72 of these announcement boards stride up and these are be': 
constructed at the Carpem&er Shoo at tha present time* 

Park Naturalist Condon presented the following programs during tne aont i 



's Union - Emigrant - iA&y 10 - % people* 
Lion's Club - Casper, Wyoming - May 15-32 peo >le* 
Kiwanis Club - Casper, Wyoming - May 16 - 91 *sople. 
Zsaak Walton League - Casper, Wyoming • May 16 - 102 people* 
Big Horn Basin ildlife Club - icrland, Wyoming - May 21 - 

97 people. 
Sin an a School - Livingston, Montana - 'ay 24 - 350 present 

Association of Midwest Pish and Game Law enforcement officer 1 * 
convention - >ieat Yellowstone - May 28 

Park Waturaliat Beal oonductad the Geology class of Hooky Mountain College 
and the Park County highschool seniors on field trips on May 22 and 23 and Pork 






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J.Uawtoa. until »*»»* Ju ~„ 6 w .S^ote troUFaithful «Hh t» D.u.lng. on tto 

of wildlife photography, 

— „ *w»*««ji „ iiwiraxj. «. oxaaiupn, University 

of Texas - Two showings - 93 people, 
GEYSERLAND IN WINTER loaned to Dr. Lowell Biddulph, University 

of Texas - Three showings - 263 people. 
BIRDS QT YELLOWSTONE loaned to Robert J. Jonas, Lewis and Clark 

Normal Schools, Lewiston, Idaho - one showing, 

95 people. 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 



All of the wayside exhibits were in use during the month of May, The 
Norris Museum foyer was used and the Mammoth Museum was open all month. The Old 
Faithful museum was opened on the 27th of May. 

Research and Observations 



Three bull elk with antlers almost full grown have been frequenting the 
Park Headquarters area throughout the month. At the beginning of the nonth their 
antlers were about 1 foot long and at the month's close had 5 prongs to each antler, 

A specimen of algae was collected on May 17 from the Mammoth Hot Spring 
Terrace 8 to fill a request from Mr. Robert Krause of rfaverford College, Haverford, 
Pennsylvania, This specimen was mailed to him on the same day. 

On May 15 on Park Naturalist Tyers' way to South Entrance he encountered 
a cow moose and calf on the road ,6 «f a mils below l«St Thumb. The cow went to 
he left and the calf to the right of the road, Tyers stopped, turned off the engine 
f the truck and took some 2x2 slides of the cow as she crossed behind the truck in 
effort to reach her calf. The most interesting thing about this episode, however, 
s the fact that Mr. Tyers distinctly heard the unexplainable whirring noise that 
a been heard over Yellowstone Lake by different persons through the years. 

Mr. Lee Coleman, district ranger at Mammoth reported seeing a newborn calf 
Ik on the evening of May 24 in the Steven's Creek area. At the month's close the 
nada Geese were off this nest with goslings in many areas of the park. Sandhill 
Cranes were still nesting at t^mpaALake area and the American Bald Eagles are nesting 
at the sites below trie 7-mile bridge on the Madison River and at a point of about 2£ 
les below Fishing Bridge on the east side of the Yellowstone River. 

On May 7 two trumpeter swan were observed by Park Naturalist Beal on a pond 
just south of Nymph Lake, The Osprey nests in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone 






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jtst of Inspiration Point and east of Lookout Point were occupied by nesting birds 
larly in the month. A pair of Peregrine falcons were observed at Lookout Point 
m May 7# During the latter part of May a pair of Trumpeter Etean began nesting 
ictivitie3 on an island in the Yellowstone Liver near the Hayden Valley overlook 
war Alum Greek. 

;he Matural History Association 



Mr. Lorin Whaalwright of Wheelwright Lithographing Co., Salt Lake City, 
Jtah was in the park on May 17, and after a careful review of The Story of old 
'sithf ul Geyser publication the Chief Park Naturalist, as the Executive Secretary 



>f the Association, entered into a contract for the printing of 25>000 copies of 
dais publication in its revised fcrm. The revised form will consist of a new format 
rith a full color cover, three duo-tone plates inside as illustrations and a whole 
lew set of black and white plates. In addition to this, the publication will be 
lade up of set-type instead of done on a typewriter as in the past, and will cost 
.6,7^ per copy F.OJI. at Park Headquarters. It will be sold at the information 
esks for 25# per copy. The first proof of this publication was reviewed and re- 
iurned to the printers on May 29. 

The association entered into an agreement with the Park County News for 
ihe printing of the interpretive program announcements for the 1957 season. A large 
lumber of these are being obtained and will be distributed throughout the park, 

Yellowstone Library and Museum Association sales stocks were prepared for 
the field stations and public sales begun as follows: 

Mammoth — — —- — — — May 1 

Old Faithful—— ——-May 27 

Pishing Bridge— —————May 31 

JQUipment and Supplies 

On May 7 a LaBelle 35mm kodaslide projector and a tape recorder were re- 
i Reived on indefinite loan from the Washington Office. The Bell & Howell niovie camera 
irhich was sent in for repairs in April was returned on May 7. 

Park Naturalist Beal serviced the four Knight public address systems and 
five converted Bell & Howell public address units on May 9 and 10, The public 
jddress system for Old Faithful Geyser cone was put up on May 26 and awaits soldering 
>f several electrical connections before it can be put into use. 

Motor vehicle* I 12026, I 12099 and I 12027 were brought out of storage 
the Mechanical Department and put into use at Mammoth, Old Faithful and Fishing 
idge, respectively. 



The following is an account of the use of the library for the month of 

Books received——— — -———.— — — — mnnn 9 

Magazines— ————— —————— ————— ———26 

Pamphlets------------- ————— ———10 

Books in Circulation— ————— ————— —121 

Books on Indefinite Loan— — — — — — — — — — 95 




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frotognnhla maA Visual Aids 



On tiny 2 Park Naturalist Tyers took a picture of the Yellowstone repre- 
isntstives who participated in tne 17th General Administrative Training course at 
; *eha, rwbraska for news release purposes. Park :<atur list Seal usde a nunkber of 

x 10 enlargements for use as illustrations on the new interpretive program 
JSJIIIIIFMK limits 



Publicity pictures were aede of the opening of the l^aat *nd South 
n May 15 1 and the Montana Stete Fed^rftion of Federal i£»ployeea Unions Convention 
in May 25. Several f Unpacks and sheet filas were developed during the nonth, 
jot&ling about 60 exposures and contact prints were made for most of these* About 
sventy-five enlargements (8 x 10) were made during the month. Eighteen of u*»ee 
iotures were dona for the Engineering Division. 

Respectively submitted, 



Merrill D. Beal 

Acting Chief Park Naturalist 



act Condon 
Beal 
file 

museum 

oc 

DCondon & DBeal/svg 



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Acting ^uporintendont , 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly heoort for June, 
Sjeda: lUcs >nf arena— 

into the aAminietretion bui on June 16» 

on building dur e balance ' h« 

- ; ntendent 
headquarters Museun on June 16 and 
tive problems with Uu 

On June 5 Park 
which occurrod on -West . • 

was brought bef ♦ . . 

Wild) r i ur in 

the month and • 

Mr. areeent .-aukee ry« 

b acti 
Hwision fro* June It.. June 13 . vo, 

■etjoagMU ' aoifio Railroad r Coon isted 

him in obtaining '-■. pictures* 

on tne evening of J 
L!r. Tony Killer f ■ v . essive l 

nor'a court and f . 

.00 for . . r wns 

license JG-4715. * 

MAffiott? - ghftpe; Lse 



The drapes o Yellowstone 

atalled is ■ Ye lie crs, 

nents were * wde for t:\eae cleaners to clean the r. . Th 

in July. 

with the raJU 

Park C • Seve - , 

the 8 inistry program has c .-ote stent I • 

gram of activities under 

ousr , 

services , -cted x ■"■ t ■ 

?uler on relii .;• Lb attached t rt. 






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In-.crvSoc _^_ 

Par f an oa 

drivers for the Yellowstone in the Canteen building on 

of Juno 9. On Jui;e 28, he gave a slmil: 
Faithful Inn. 

The annual In-Gervice Trail 
ta 7th s held during; s 17 t 20. T. "n- 

ify am conformed to the itinerary of 

port. Park Jaturalists of the Int 

am. There were 39 se 
IS i ts part 

3d are as follows i 

rt son 

Gacrga L. i)own: 

■e Good Kalp 

an 

Robert Tur: son 

Wm. Fischer . son 

Donald .on • £ohroeder 

Al . or 

er 

The Yellows' 
four (4) buses for . 

tion pictures a rtion 

in the in-: , iai 

uS fit in- 

Me - a of 1 

cedures to 

r 
1957 season. 

. 

Park 

ular ribute IderBb 

.. Park Nat srs fmt 

time. -stural" 

June 1 to June 13 and w to aci.'.vc duty on 

for 1 . 

xcept for 8 

Good 

left foot while atte iptir. 
Spring. Tlds accident occurred on J 
for treatment. 



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Seasonal Park Ranker i on 6 its ft 

season i 



Herbert T # Lystz-up 


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Eugene Devenport 


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L. Downing 


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Elmer on 


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J. Devi s 


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Lowell . 






1 M a Beal 


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Arthur Nash 


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.ace M. G 


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Walter "'. lierriiian 


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Don . • rphy 


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Wayne . le 


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Burt >8 • son 


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Robert J« Jonas 


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rphy 


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Dav.' 


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Clarence C, Alleraan 


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way on June 20 • 
report* 

In order that t 
pretive services r\ ■ -, *oen 72 in 

boards made up and the.?* 5 isve >ee 






These announcement boards advise the people 
various cer.ters of . r con . 

was re 3 on Ju 

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Per 

on June 2 

oth to To\7e3 

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and inter o services to the • 

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terrace area in the nee r± 

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- 5 - 



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on Ju mi 7« the cut-flo -er y at the J on June 7 

and the one jamoth . 

All o ! ba were 

month cf June* 

a were 

- , jo on u 

, r. on June L . &r. 
In t I ice on June . 

'eel aspects 
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June and 1 
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park June 1 for rpo3e of atteiaptin 

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occasions. 

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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



June 3, 1957 



:ULARj£L- 



Religious services in Yellowstone National Park for the 1957 season will be- 
i| with Protestant services June 2, and will continue through September 29. Latter-Day 
fnts services begin June 9 and continue until September 8. Roman Catholic services 
11 begin June 23 and continue until September 1. (There will be a special Roman 
■nolic service on Thursday, August 15). Protestant church and Sunday school services 
I conducted each Sunday throughout the year in the Yellowstone National Park Chapel at 
noth. 






TIME AND PLACE OF 
RELIGIOUS SERVICES EACH SUNDAY 

Yellowstone National Park Chapel; Mammoth: 

Roman Catholic 9:00 a.m. 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 10:30 a.m. 
Latter-Day Saints 7:00 p.m. 

Old Faithful Lodge Recreation Hall: 

Roman Catholic 6:00 a.m. 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Scientist 1:00 p.m. 

Latter-Day Saints 7:00 p.m. 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry 

Vesper Service). 8:30 p.m. 

Lake Lodge Recreation Hall: 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 8:00 a.m. 

Roman Catholic 10:30 a.m. 

Latter-Day Saints 7:00 p.m. 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 9:00 p.m. 

Fishing Bridge Museum Amphitheater: 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 10:30 a.m. 

Canyon Hotel Lounge: 

Roman Catholic 6:00 a.m. 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry 

"Canyon Vespers") 10:30 a.m. 

Latter-Day Saints 2:30 p.m. 

Canyon Outdoor Amphitheater: 

Protestant (A National Porks Ministry) 6:30 p.m. 

- 1 - 



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Camp Roosevelt Lodge Lobby: 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 10:30 a.m. 
West Thumb Recreation Hall: 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 8:00 a.m. 
West Thumb Recreation Hall (Tuesday evening) : 

Protestant (A National Parks Ministry) 9:15 p.n. 

SATURDAY SERVI CES 

Yellowstone National Park Chapel, Mammoth: 2:30 p.m. 

Old Faithful Lodge Recreation Hall: 

Seventh-Day Adventists 10:00 a.m. to 

12:00 noon. 

These religious services are to be announced each Saturday night at the 
oipfire programs by seasonal park ranger naturalists. The personnel manning in- 
itiation desks at all museums and ranger stations are to use the schedule provided 
|h this circular in answering inquiries about religious services. 

Printed schedules of church services for the 1957 season are posted on 
.etin boards at all public use areas. Refer people to them. 

The Protestant services conducted by a National Parks Ministry at Mammoth, 
ajyon, and Camp Roosevelt will be in charge of Student Minister Robert Thomson and 
hfse at Old Faithful, West Thumb, Lake and Fishing Bridge will be in charge of Student 
iEster Jack Jennings. These young men are sponsored by the National Council of the 
■rches of Christ and will be available all week, each week, to render any aid they 
a; to the park visitors and employees. Student Minister Thomson will be headquartered 
tMammoth and Mr. Jennings at Old Faithful. 

The Roman Catholic services will be under the direction of the Rev. Francis 
3 enny of Cody, Wyoming. He will be assisted by three priests. 

Latter-Day Saint Services will be directed by missionaries from the St. 
jihony, Idaho Stake Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 

There will, in all probability, be inquiries from people concerning the time 
f church services at West Yellowstone and Gardiner, Montana. There will be Roman 
aholic services in West Yellowstone in Our Lady of the Pines Roman Crtholic Church 
ah Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. The Roman Catholic services in Gardiner will be held 
nSaint Williams Church each Sunday at 7:00 a.m. There will be Protestant Services 
.nWest Yellowstone at 11:00 a.m. each Sunday and in Gardiner at 8:00 a.m. Latter-Day 
>aint services in Yifest Yellowstone at 7:00 p.m. Protestant services at Cooke, Montana 
Ltj8:00 a.m. 

This circular is supplied so that you will be able to properly inform the 
'iitors on all religious services planned for the 1957 season. 



Lemuel ft. r r\-r-- ; =i.r-- 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



PROGRAM OF INTERPRETIVE SERVICES 
1957 Season 



May 27, 1957 



The program of interpretive services to be in effect for the 1957 
season in Yellowstone National Park is as follows: 



MUSEUM HOURS 
INFORMATION DESK 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



GUIDED WALKS 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



MAMMOTH 

8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk dur- 
ing the museum hours „ He answers questions and 
sells literature on the National Parks. 

The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives mus- 
eum talks whe never enough visitors who are inter- 
ested in obtaining interpretive information are pre- 
sent to call them together. Museum talks are given 
each time bus parties arrive at the Museum. When 
the work load will permit, two men should be in the 
museum during rush hours. 

NATURE WALK - Exploring the terraces and woodlands. 
Leaves the headquarters museum at 8:00 a.m. and 
Liberty Cap at 8:15 a.m. This walk follows the 
route of the Terrace Forest Trail from Liberty Cap 
to Narrow Gauge Terrace, thence to Clematis Gulch 
and down Clematis Gulch. The trip is completed by 
11:00 a.m. 

TERRACE WALKS - To interpret and view thermal phen- 
omena. Morning trips 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. be- 
ginning from Liberty Cap. Afternoon trips at 1:00, 
2:00 and 3:00 p.m. These terrace walks are to be 
taken over the lower portion of the Mammoth Hot 
Spring Terraces and return to Liberty Cap. 

CLEMATIS GULCH SELF-GUIDING TRA IL - maintained by 
the Mammoth naturalist staff. It is a self -guiding 
trail which begins at the mouth of Clematis Gulch 
and continues up this gulch for about l/2 mile, 
crosses the ridge to the vicinity of Narrow Gauge 
Terrace and returns to Liberty Cap via the Old 
Norris Road. There will be no guided trips on 
this trail, but is is well signed with interpre- 
tive labels for the use of all park visitors who 
care to travel the trail at their leisure. 



AUTO CARAVANS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



TERRACE CARAVAN - Begins at the headquarters 
museum at 2:00 p.m. Goes over the upper terraces 
visiting Main Terrace, Prospect Terrace, Soda 
Spring, and terminates at Angel Terrace. 

WILDLIFE SEARCH CARAVAN - begins at the headquarters 
museum at 6:30 p.m. and returns to the campfire 
circle by 8:00 p.m. Visitors drive their own cars. 
Moose, antelope, deer and other animal life may be 
seen on this trip. The road follows the main high- 
way from Mammoth to .iillow Park or over other road 
sections if it becomes desirable to use them in order 
to seek wildlife. The time of this activity may be 
advanced to an earlier hour in the evening in the 
late season. 

Each evening a program is held in the Mammoth out- 
door amphitheater at 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a 
short campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 

A program will be presented each evening in the 
Eagle's Hall in Gardiner, Montana from 8:00 to 
9:00 p.m., and will conform to the program pattern 
for the park. A naturalist from the Mammoth staff 
will provide this service. 

NORRIS GEYSER BASIN 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk dur- 
ing museum hours. He answers questions and provides 
other interpretive services. 

Short museum talks are given to groups of people 
who assemble at the museum and to bus parties at 
the time of their arrival there. 



GUIDED WALKS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
CIRCLE 



There are geyser walks conducted by park ranger 
naturalists over the main geyser basin loop trail 
in the morning and afternoon upon the arrival of 
bus tour parties. Additional trips will be made 
whenever there are large enough groups of motorists 
or special parties which have assembled and who are 
interested in such guide services. 

On a trial basis an evening campfire circle group 
will meet in the Norris Campground for an informal 
campfire talk on Mondays, V/ednesdays and Fridays 
of each week. 



SELF -GUIDING TRAIL 



GREEN DR AGON SPRING SELF-GUIDING TRAIL - a well- 
labeled self -guiding geyser and nature trail. It 
is maintained by the park ranger naturalist at 
Norris. This trail has two routes that can be 
followed - a short trip of one mile, or the entire 
southern Norris geyser basin loop of 1-3/4- miles. 



-?, 



MADISCN JUNCTION 



MUSEUM HOURS 
GUIDED TRIPS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

Special hikes will be organized and conducted from 
this station as work time available permits. 

A park ranger naturalist is on duty at the inform- 
ation desk during open hours to answer questions 
and sell publications. 

The park ranger naturalist on duty gives short museum 
talks on the history of the park, the Park Service 
and the development of the National Park System to 
bus parties, special groups and whenever there are 
enough visitors assembled to provide an audience. 

There is an informal campf ire program at the camp- 
fire circle each evening from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

CID FAITHFUL 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



GUIDED WALKS 



GEYSER TALKS 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He answers questions and 
sells literature on the National Parks. 

NATURE WALK - exploring Geyser Hill and the forest 
trail to Observation Point. The trip begins at 
Old Faithful cone, leaves at 8:00 a.m. and returns 
to Old Faithful Geyser cone at 11:00 a.m. 

GEYSER HIL L l/ALKS - exploring Geyser Hill. Route 
of travel is over Geyser Hill, down to Lion group 
and return to Old Faithful. Trips after each 
eruption of Old Faithful Geyser from 8:00 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. 

NOTICE: All walks begin from Old Faithful Geyser 
cone and announcements of these walks will be 
made in the Old Faithful museum by the naturalist 
at the information desk. The naturalist conduct- 
ing them will announce them at the Old Faithful 
cone talk. 

CONE TALKS - The naturalist conducting the walk 
from Old Faithful cone will present short 10-15 
minute talks preceding each daylight eruption of 
this geyser. 



-3- 



MUSEUM HOURS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



FISHING BRIDGE 

8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 
p.n. Open 9:00 p.n.'to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a nan on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He will answer questions 
and sell literature on the National Parks. 



MUSEUM IiJTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives 
museum talks whenever enough visitors who are 
interested in obtaining interpretive information 
are present to call them together. Museum talks 
are given each time bus parties arrive at the 
museum. 



GUIDED WALKS 



THERMAL OBSERVATIONS 



EVENING TALKS 



NATURE WALK - begins at the Fishing Bridge Museum, 
explores the lake shore area and explores the 
swamp near Fishing Bridge. The walk begins at 
8:30 a.m. and should return to the museum by 
11:30 a.m. On the trip people should learn the 
biology of the Lake area, geology of the Lake 
area and should have an opportunity to see plant 
life forms and an interesting array of animals. 

NATURE WALK AT LAKE - starts at the Lake Lodge at 
9:00 a.m. and returns by 11:00 a.m. The route to 
be followed is the old Elephant Back trail. 

Park ranger naturalists at Fishing Bridge will 
patrol the Mud Volcano area and render information 
service. 

EVENIiE CAriPFIRE PROGRAM * held in the Fishing 
Bridge amphitheater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It 
is a short campfire talk illustrated with colored 
slides or motion pictures. 

LAKE LODGE TALK - held in the Lake Lodge recreation 
hall from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. except on Sundays. It 
is a short talk illustrated with colored slides or 
motion pictures. 

CANYON 



GUIDED WALKS 



NORTH RIM T RIPS - route followed will be one of the 
park ranger naturalist's choice, and may be any one 
of the following: exploring the Canyon-Cascade 
Creek Trail, the guided trip down Red Rock Trail 
or the bear campground nature trail. All trips be- 
gin at the Canyon Ranger Station at 8:30 a.m. and 
return to this point by 11:30 a.m. 



-5- 



.—6, 



I 






! 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE 
AT OBSERVATION 
POINTS 



EVENING TALKS 



TUTU RIi.i TRIP - This is the adv \urous and thrill- 
ing hike dorm Uncle Tom's trail \.a the canyon bottom 
at the bcse of the Lower Falls. These v/alks start 
at the South Rim Upper Fall Overlook at 8:30 a.m. 
and return by 11:30 a'#m» - again at 2:00 p.m. and 
returning about 4-: 30 p.m. 

Seasonal park ranger naturalists are stationed daily 
at Grand View or Lookout Point and at Artist Point 
from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. These men provide inter- 
pretation, information and help to park visitors. 
They present short talks which interpret the Canyon's 
scenic grandeur and geology to any and all groups 
that can be assembled. In addition, they serve the 
protective function of looking after the public's 
safety. 

C ANYON EVENING C&IPF IRE PROGRAM * this program will 
be conducted in the old Canyon amphitheater from 
8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It is a siiort campfire talk ill- 
ustrated with colored slides or motion oictures. 

TCUER FALL 



GUIDED UALKS 



ITature walk exploring lost Creek is a naturalist 
guided nature trail hike which leaves the lodge at 
Camp Roosevelt daily at 8:A5 a.m. and returns by 
11:15 a.m. This is one of the outstanding trails 
in 'the park for f lovers, birds, mammals and scenic 
landscapes, l/hen there are no hiking parties the 
naturalist will provide information service at the 
Observation ooint at Tower Fall. 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE 
AT OBSERVATION 
POINT 



The park ranger naturalist stationed at Tower Fall 
serves the park visitors at the Tower Fall obser- 
vation platform from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. He 
meets the people and provides them with an inter- 
pretation of the landscape and informrtion on 
Yellowstone, 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



The Lost Falls self-guiding nature trail winds up 
Lost Creek to Lost Falls. The nature labels along 
this trail will be maintained by the park ranger 
nature list strtioned at Tower Fall. 



EVENING PROGRAM 



Each evening in the lebb of Camp Roosevelt Lodge 
at 8:15 p.m. there will be a short talk, illustrated 
with colored slides or motion oictures. 



The scheduled interpretive activities for any station are not to be 
changed until the proposed changes have been reviewed and approved by the Chief 
Park Naturalist. The program as outlined here should be adequate to meet the 
interpretive needs of the public during the 1957 season. If this program can 
be improved by changes in scheduled activities, or by the addition of activities, 
your suggestions will be welcomed by the Chief Park Naturalist's Office. 

REFER TO THIS SCHEDULE 17HEN YOU ARE IN DiUBT AS TO THE THE AND TYPE 

OF ACTIVITIES THAT ARE BEING CONDUCTED AT THE VARIOUS INTERPRETIVE STATIONS 

THROUGHOUT THE PARK! • ,. ■ 1 

/ / -// > / 

_ David de L. Condon 



( 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 

FRE-SEASON TRAINING PROGRAM 

for 

SEASONAL RANGER FORCE 



June 17. 1957 



MORNING 



CANTEEN-MONDAY- JUNE 17. 1957 



^0 - 8:15 Purpose and organization of Chief Park Ranger Brown 

Conference, 

.5 - 8:30 Welcome to Yellowstone and to Superintendent Garrison 

Conference, 

iO - 9:00 Basic employment data: Salary; 

pay periods; deduction from 
salary; Medical plan; Annual and 
Sick leave; Overtime; Quarters; 
Uniform allowance; Shopping 
facilities; Church; Dental ser- 
vice. Fiscal Accountant Gabbert 

r)0 - 9:30 The primary function and re- 

sponsibility of the Protection 
Division of the Yellowstone 
National Park Ranger Force, Chief Park Ranger Brown 

$0 - 10:00 The primary functions of the 

Interpretive Division of the 
Yellowstone National Park 
Ranger Force. Chief Park Naturalist Condon 

00 - 10:10 RECESS Show of hands for meal check . 

10 - 11:00 Functions, objectives and policies 

of the National Park Service. Chief Park Ranger Brown 

CO - 11:30 Organization of the National 

Park Service, Park Naturalist Dave Benl 

.30 - 12:00 Yellowstone National Park 

Organizations and Operations 

including functions of divisions 

other than the Ranger Force. Assistant Superintendent Hamilto; 

!00 - 1:00 LUNCH HOUR I 



I 



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! AFTERNOON 
io - 1:30 
ifO - 1:45 
45 - 2:45 



1 5 
5 






2:55 
3:25 



5 - 4:15 



5 - 4:45 

5 - 5:00 
EVENING 



- 9:20 



Concessions Operation Management Assistant Joffe 
Cooperating Government Agencies Chief Park Ranger Brown 



Investigative jurisdiction of 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
in Yellowstone; conduct of co- 
operative criminal investi- 
gations. 



Supervisory Park Ranger 
Harold R. Jones 



RECESS 

Jurisdiction in Yellowstone 
and function of Resident 
United States Commissioner. 

Characteristics of the 
Yellowstone Visitor, and 
Information Service to ful- 
fill visitor needs. 

Public Safety responsi- 
bilities. 

Employee Attitudes 



Significance and outstand- 
ing features of Yellowstone. 

Plans for Field Trip 



United States 
Commissioner Brown 



Chief Park Naturalist Condon 

Supervisory Park Ranger 
Harold R. Jones 

Chief Park Ranger Brown 



Chief Park Naturalist Condon 
ii it n tt 



- 2 - 






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FIELD TRIP-TUESDAY-JUNE 18, 1957 



RNING 



8:00 Group assemble at Park Head- 

quarters Museum. Explanation 
of the procedures to be followed 
on trip. Park Naturalist Condon 

8:10 Buses loaded and trip underway 

8:30 Swan Lake Flat. Story of the 

Gallatin Range. - Geography - 
Geology - Biology of general 
area viewed from this point. Park Naturalist Condon 

8:55 Moose Exhibit, Willow Park. 

Story of Moose - Beaver - 
Origin of such willow parks - 
value of wayside exhibits. Park Naturalist Dave Beal 

9:15 Apollinaris Spring. Story of 

Cold Spring, brief comment on 
trees of the plateau. Park Naturalist Condon 

9:30 Obsidian Cliff and Exhibit. 

Short story about obsidian - 
its origin, uses, and its sig*»' 
nificance as a geological 
oddity. Park Naturalist John Tyers 

9:50 Roaring Mountain - story in the bus. 

L0:00 Nymph Lake, Sandhill Crane - story in the bus. 

10:10 Norris Geyser Basin: 

Trip over north basin trail Park Ranger Naturalist 

(25 minutes). Dr. Arthur Nash 

Museum talk and review (10 

minutes); Trip to Steamboat 

Geyser and brief on self- Park Naturalist 

guiding trail. Dave Beal 

LI: 10 Virginia Cascades - story in bus, 

Lli25 Solfatara Plateau - story in bus. 

11:30 Burned over area - story in bus. 

LI: 4-5 Canyon Village Park Naturalist 

('MISSION 66) Condon 

A teNOON (Tuesday, June 18, 1957) 

JL2:45 LUNCH - Cany on Mess 

1:4-5 Artist Point. Story of Grand 

Canyon - Geological intcrpreta- Park Naturalist 
tion - scenic grandeur. Wayne Replogle 



I 



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': 






2:15 Lookout Point. Story of Uncle 

Ton's Trail - Red Rock Trail - 
Stairway to Brink of Falls - 

Moran and his interpretations Park Naturalist 
of the Canyon. John A. Tyers 

2:4-5 Inspiration Point. Osprey 

and other birds of the Canyon- 
Construction of new observation 

facilities - a review of the Park Ranger Naturalist 
Evergreens of the park. Robert J. Jonas 

3:30 Dunraven Pass area. Timberline 

Trees; White Bark Pine; Blister District Park Ranger 
Rust; Forest Management. Harold 0. Edwards 

A: 20 Tower Fall. Geological story 

of the Canyon and Falls - Park Naturalist 
Specimen Ridge. Condon 

4:45 Petrified Tree - story of the Park Naturalist 

Fossil Forests. Dave Beal 

5:15 Hell Roaring Overlook above 

Insect Infestation area - Wild- 
life problems and management District Park Ranger 
policies, Harold 0. Edwards 

itENING 

6:00 Arrive Back at Mammoth. Dinner - Mammoth Mess. 

8:00 Round Table Discussion - Canteen Building - MAMMOTH: 

A. The uniform - when, where Supervisory Park Ranger 
and how to wear it. (Management Assistant Garry) 

B. Naturalist Evening pro- Park Naturalist 
grams. Condon 

C. Yellowstone Library and Park Naturalist 
Museum Association. Dave Beal 

D. Visual and Audio equip- Park Naturalist 
ment - its use and care. John A. Tyers 

E. Government Property: 
1. Issuance, use, re- 
sponsibility and Park Naturalist 
accountability. John A. Tyers 

F. Preparation of reports 
and station records: 

1. Statistical reports. Park Naturalist 

2. Daily records. Dave Beal 

3. Monthly Report. Park Naturalist 

Condon 



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MOR NING 
:00 - 9:00 

:00 - 10:00 

3:00 - 10:10 
D:10 - 11:10 

L:10 - 12:00 



2:00 - 1:00 

L:00 - 1:30 

L:30 - 2:00 

2:00 - 2:30 



CANTEEN-WEDNESDAY- JUNE 19, 1957 



1957 Physical Improvement 
Program for Yellowstone. 

Organization, facilities 
and operation of Chief 
Ranger's office. 



Park Engineer Rowe 



Supervisory Park Ranger 
(Management Assistant Garry) 



RECESS Show of hands for meal check 



Yellowstone Forest and 
Building Fire Protection 
Organization and operations. 

Inspection of Fire Fighting 
Equipment, Fire Cache and 
Dispatcher's Office. 



Assistant Chief Ranger 

Chapman 



Assistant Fire Chief Stevens 
Fire Cache Supervisor Tracy 



AFTERNOON (Wednesday, June 19, 1957) 



2:30 - 2:55 
2:55 - 3:05 
:05 - 3:30 



LUNCH HOUR 

Operation, Maintenance and 
care of Government vehicles. 

Communications System and its 
operation; CONELRAD plan. 

Safety: in personal work 
practises; in relation to be- 
havior of Park visitors and 
natural hazards; in re- 
lation to Government facilities 
and Tort Claims, 

Highway Patrol activities. 

RECESS 



Equipment Supervisor Robinson 
Supervisory Park Ranger Valdcr 



Supervisory Park Ranger Jones 
Supervisory Park Ranger Jones 



Entrance Station Operations; 
Scope of operations; 
Fiscal responsibility and 

reason for bonds; 
Situations encountered and 

how to meet them; 
Use of Manual; Need for courtesy; 

and a helpful attitude; Supervisory Park Ranger 
Correct information. (Management Assistant Garry) 



- 5 - 



( 



I 






3:30 - 4:00 Emergencies other than fire Supervisory Park Ranger 

(Management Assistant) Garry 

4:00 - 4:30 Rules and Regulations and their 

enforcements; responsibilities; 
common offenses and methods of 
handling, (Admonition, reprimand, 
arrest); preventive law enforce- 
ment. Supervisory Park Ranger Jones 

4:30 - 5:00 Assessment of special qualifi- 

cations and experience of trainees, 
and listing thereof; (First Aid 
and water safety, typing and 
clerical, 

mountain climbing, 
motor boat operation, 
saddle and pack horse use, 

forest and building fire control, (Chief Park Ranger Brown) 
trail maintenance, Supervisory Park Ranger 

statistical analysis). (Management Assistant) Garry 

EVENING 

:00 - 9:00 The National Park Service 

MISSION 66, including Yellow- 
stone's Program for the next Landscape Architect 
9 years. Frank Mattson 

:00 Plans for the Field Trip Chief Park Naturalist Condon 



- 6 - 






< 



( 



) 

FIELD TRIP-THURSDAY-JUNE 20, 1957 



DRNING 



6:15 Breakfast - Mammoth Mess . 

7:00 Buses leave Mammoth. 

7:50 Chocolate Pots, Gibbon Cascades - slow 

passing - story in bus. 

8:05 Beryl Spring - story in bus. 

8:20 Gibbon Falls - view from middle obser- 

vation point if possible to swing buses 
in and out. Bus story. 

8:25 Tuff Cliff - Bus story. 

8:30 Terrace Spring - Bus story. 

8:35 Historical Museum, Madison Junction 

A. National Park History 

B. National Park Service History 

C. National Park Service 

Policies and Ideals, Park Naturalist Condon 

9:00 Firehole Falls and Canyon - story in 

buses, 

9:15 Nez Perce Creek. Story of the Nez 

Perce retreat and incidents associ- 
ated with it which occurred in Park Ranger Naturalist 
Yellowstone. Dr. M, D. Beal 

}:4.0 Fountain Paing Pots. Morning 

Geyser, Clepsydra Geyser and Park Naturalist 
Fountain Geyser. H. T. Lystrup. 

10:Q5 Firehole Lake - story in buses, 

10:10 White Dome - Great Fountain 

and Surprise Pool, 

10:20 Excelsior Geyser - Grand Pris- 

matic. Trip through Midway Park Ranger Naturalist 
Geyser Basin. T.l T t rkinson 

10:4-0 Trip through Biscuit Basin, 

catching Sapphire and Jewel Park Ranger Naturalist 
in erruption. M, D, Beal 

11:00 Morning Glory - Vandalism and Park Naturalist 

its effects. Condon 

11:10 Grotto, Giant, Daisy - Black 

Sand Basin - Story from the 
buses, 

_ - 7 - 



« 



I 



. 



I 

FTERNOON (Thursday, June 20, 1957) 



11:20 Greater Geyser Hill Walk, Park Naturalist George 

D. Marler 

12:45 LUNCH - Old Faithful Mess, 

1:4.5 Kepler Cascades, Rhyolite 

Flows - Origin of Waterfalls Park Naturalist 
and Cascades, Condon 

2:05 Shoshone Point. Talk on lakes 

of Yellowstone - other National 
Parks, emphasis on neighbor Park Naturalist 
park, Grand Teton National Park, John A, Tyers 

2:35 West Thumb Geyser Basin. Trip 

through basin - Pott's letters -Park Ranger Naturalist 
Absorka Mountains - Lake, Dr. Wm, Driscoll 

3*30 Lako Fish Hatchery. Tho " 

etcty.of spawn taking -,tith- 

trapping aod artifioial pro- Fish & Wildlife or 

pogation - examination of Park Ranger Naturalist 
specimens in the acquarium. Alma E, Teuscher, 

4-: 10 Fishing Bridge Museum, Talk 

on birds of Lake area and re- Park Naturalist 
view of Museum exhibits. Dr. Lowell Biddulph 

4-:4-0 Leave for Lake Butte. Pelican 

Creek - Squaw Lake stories in 
buses. 

5:00 Lake Butte, Review of Yellow- 

stone's Natural resources and 
values they have for the people. Park Naturalist Condon 

t^ENING 



6:15 Dinner - Lake Mess 

7:00 Leave for Dragon's Mouth and 

Mud Volcano. 

7:25 Mud Volcano area, seeing: Black 

Dragon's Caldron, Mud Volcano, 

Dragon's MoTith and Sulphur Park Naturalist 
Caldron. Dr. Lowell Biddulph 

8:10 River overlook at Alum Creek, 

Story of Hayden Valley - River - Park Naturalist 
Bison, Dave Beal 

9:10 RETURN TO MAMMOTH 



I 



( 



■i * 






) 

TRAINEES ARE EXPECTED TO: 

Be punctual and orderly in loading and unloading. 

Pay attention . Be alert. Take notes if they will be of later value, (Use back 

of these sheets if you do not have a notebook.) 

Ask questions . Avoid horse play. 

Make surest ions , to leaders if points are not clear or are nissed. 

Capitalize on the information made available. 

The following sources of information are available to you: 

An information manual on Yellowstone National Park. 

Park Rangers Administrative Manuals on: 

(a) General Park organization 

(b) Duties and Instructions 

(c) Park Regulations 

(d) Information and Policies 

(e) District Boundaries 

(f ) Yellowstone forest fire plan and guide 

Park Rangers Checking Station Manual 
Report Manual, giving details on: 

(a) Wildlife reports 

(b) Forestry and fire protection reports 

(c) Accident reports - (All types) 

(d) Checking station reports 

(e) Miscellaneous reports 

(f) Travel regulations and reports 

(g) Issuance of permits 

Red Cross first aid text book. 
For Fire Protection and Fighting: 

(a) Fire protection training handbook. 

(b) Western Fire Fighters guide, 

Yellowstone Trail Manual, 

Station library consisting of good books on Natural History, Western History, and 
especially all outstanding key publications on Yellowstone. 

These manuals and source material can be obtained from: 

(a) Headquarters Research Library at Mammoth 

(b) Your immediate field station library 

(c) District Ranger's offices 

- 9 - 



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August 2 . 

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intendent, Yellowstone Park 
Lef Par 

Month" 1 . rt for September, 

pecial /ctJvHI-. j ■ i Conferences 

Chief Pork b advised the A»erj 

f t height of infill* a J ,icn ne noon or 2, 

7. T:ie time cf eruption was 11:43 *•*• and t. 

, rt ;lansen and <r. Lot .- arrived in 

P September 6 from the diversity. P la- 

tent portraying the ashburn-Langford )oane carapfire st 
ad I through September .. Prof. 

uost apartments from iber 6 to . 

Kflng their ttete automobile wrecked due to a collision on the 

h between th and Gardiner. stures , it \ 

Dented on the 12th, were sent out rs on the L rk 

list. Park Naturalist Condon 
yige, Jpckson hole on the 17th. It b to oance 

:>f.ire day pageant on Geotember 19 because of inc. 
lllen oil ay and th d, 

S l (till stor ' that evening. 

were brief opportun 
many of the 

>rds with Lurali.it John E. Doerr and Chief i 

maid Lee. on the evening of the 17 

>rae natters irith t! . 

lcrt conferences -sere not insti . by the 
r t ivolvod. 

afternoon of 
imraittee visited wii:h the Chief 

Cn September 20 Peril 

-son to the road section bet 
iat ti:. I the p i are tx 

>adway. 

ley, former perk naturalist ii :1 & - tor 

l book "Plants of k" was in 

fice on the 25th and t tiic nts book soussed. 

easure to know that the authors were well n. 









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ber 26 'lin 

ottBf .'.ayne brjrent and Par ineer Bee 

illage where the grov its 

. 30 went t 

he exhibits to be installed in 3 . 

Park Matu 
at the v 

. O :T l 

Car; , e, ..... 

Man 'roth, 

Madieon 

n ' urn and , 1£ 



>n the 20t . 



sras cl< 



Ul — M „■' - find, litowl v?,<? 

iervices v; e chu 

he Roman C Le services were t> 

b i, and 

i the month, 

■ 
services at 9: . . . . 

nd a t service wr . m on t 

beii 3on, i 

or anoth-Gardiner eoaraunitv 13th 

ant service which was con 
f Boaeman, Montana • . Jack ■ 

the su , 

^©s:5 .- . 

nnelj. 



as on 

eptember - . 

eeaonal personnel were terminated dw 



Wm, . "iac 

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Joseph J, 

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Clerence G. A3 , 

John Telsberg Laborer ( 

owart Pa: ., 

• • 

tMUll ?£ ,, 

ins Laborer (, 

Pr 
ervices were eai 

arler 1 cts of 

as elvised b; ? of I 

ler© would b« 

and urn arr' 

P v5500 and on the basis of , 

Lose cf t 

ascciated sit 

Loy personnel to rill it,. 

Pork 

• ■ 

■iecest- rts on 

je. 

•evented by 

>sn tnsy ser 

inyon area. 

inter. 

t the conferrees. 

:St fr,T 

•operation m reec . , 

r. 

t t. 
-•ere in t g 

■ 
araoth oaths 6th, 7th and th, and dress rehearsals war- eld - • : . ' : ; 

La*. ? V' 

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s were wtv\e 
nts as well es Vie arrangements fo: 

I 
8 well received. It was 
resent 

e Canyon theater wr:. 

replr ce tc the right 

when 1 • 

j r- 

fc'l am i .... 

, 11th 

■d the 12th. Prrk 

tel on the evening of 

ace al • 

• 
e School 
geant on 

. • on 
13th and ' 71 'f, £**%r**v>-^ y . . 

. '• • 

• • I 

in i , , rris, 

'ax 

.nee ct th , 

Is » « . . 

ntr.na br to Xell< ". - . 

iturallat Condon 

tri i b via t . 

lis {Toup at 

Jcing them to Lake I utte » . 

theater at 
mat being laid, fireplace 
.e was fin 
11 be in readiness 
saoth ter we a c 

re die ! as of V. 

ce at MsaBothj Morris | idlsoa, 
we ...-raent signs 

jater as well os the se2 - j. 

Par 
tor ny and Jaokson . , 

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tfm-seun ' ct.lv dibits 

F. . oer son was taken t .ild si ti 

end at th ie sort of a -cture 

exhibit cT nits was reviewed. 

A copy of n was 

worked up and was . r- 

ents Conference and a copy of t 

Btw Canyon V:' . ck to 

in fua 

Ti- 
to nnel was p^ 10 

, 

on 

>er 3C AsyufO^+*~*^' 

r, 
Lly 
in the »] an but had 

'Mud V< " 

Th oth an . 

lad. 

ber on to herbarium in the peo 

lgfi~' -■ " .: . ^ • >- T on 



• ■ trip to ': :id 

names of John 
ce vhei 1. 

Dr. :e of 1 ♦ . . , 

on September 4. end or, . , an 

3ta for the 

Lble, to 

travertine quarries are: , er, . coal 

bed air! sediment . lot 

1 * terraces and the Koodoos, 

rettp and t. ,ed th- , 

t 7*Mile Bridge and . They also v. the 

area on the Gardtoefr'River, , j£l 

5 ea and spent 

part- ere: H, S, Hicke and W, J, n of 

Robins of 306 Longs iale , esota; Dr. . . 

Department of , ntt; )r , . • Jcl , 

rrio and . . .... it 1 

in the but it 'or anyone to be of service to them. 






Dr. 

f iber, . 

her ^l ch st . r # 

r 15 incrc 

he oldest of these f in- 

oeess . 

;ber 1( 
•11 Telephone 

whole . 

corrosive effects which the r.cid, t 

On 

aid. 

• and brought the . 

■ 
tvie, 

t 
Lspla; s of 

a ell were unanimous in thai 
b©> nytain , f roI !j - 

raens with reds end orenges 

: izon but « 

aes in the west, t . 

(lades of light o< ctly 

■frerhti b swirl 

|il anting waves from 

astern tc the ctly 

»ad« It mi an ui 

littles • I.obert 

jure , 

■ 

temperature of 

... aon of Island , 

^■vd on the 2?th, 

oer 3C 
k t . 

lC- I 
8e , 

irily l 
e raaained slon the i'ellcwstcne iv r ' r i.rt ■ • . 



liij i. 



Mrs, Lucile . until 

Hbober 14 v 

Agner's work consisted of 
P a 13 brer, • 






record of tho library ae 



Books recel ved . , . . ••••••••••••••••••• 

..274 

m Iti'lef.Vt.au 

...... ..ir 

...........••• 



HKli LttBS tidUL 

r: . 

Lark and m 

icto albiuas u ate. . . 

■ilno ted her so . • 

■; tact " 
>rt anefta f . 

n arid on of . 

ke expense , . . sut 

rms used 
bree ith &- 

1 aference. 

Mflpcien^ anfl "up^leB 

!•] , , ic 

Idresc unit and v ice, 

.lovrstone P**rk I 

ublic orris, 

•em fiej 

it 'or use ir; ' 

>en x _ t Lirned • 

!£££_= U±S - IB 

John Teisbe 

>• A social riln Ho xrl 

icsc noctures were taken of : LMi&i&t- y 3 

-Old 

, 
►Us of 3c exp. 35m kodftftlJ c 

i© aonl . m were :;3ed i: 

ide sixty»six 

ire •' , 

> to late . 

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Mr, itens , --ilif • 

... 
;a to Mexico ] * 

lo who it r of 

jftiore \ TV 

;iven help on low : *e. 

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hran . 

9th of . 

Mr» Ir\ I 
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Wit: , . • 

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lent 'i3 Eilgae wet: 

>f a li.lt brine CI y :r- Is 

rhere thoy feed on i. s 

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■y . It ' 

iteuti "* . , 

in v ' ' . 

:ool was ; ." 

Bohemian 
losraunl-. If ba 

Lag to I : 

•A flock of 
| i :. 
plew Into t 

"Glossary of 

-biers >a" 

"Ii. 

• 

Books •••«••«....« 10 

• • ••••••••• 

oka on 

• 17 

3 

Pel Is ai 

*e turned about . . 

itorA - 

• asscoictio, 
succeed :iira. 
laoe 



ssoe'uti one's bi .. ■; has been In the fern of • 

BDt tC 

d on No vest , .•••■ esse . • 

. v . - 

in 1 , 

.ion ai on of n # 

— — - - £l 221A&I 

' x 16 ■ scr 
heater fro -11 1< art 

frftV ,' ?- .-, ■ 9*<4 .Mil 

• V. : 
,©p of .vunsen Peak on ^ 

A set cf 79 or 

en in e 7 a. 

t t 

»re sen . 

ets of seen -.<■.. . 

All o 

16 esseabl-: 

r, " 
a tevc 

i 
- 

' strict . . 

aese m Is on . 

•- 
or submission to the 

ilea. Iheso wsr^ ied in I 

itto : to b • ce on 

; 
hirty-four L a wer^. , 

crtfc 8 x 10 en! 



■ber 
kee ■:> cur 



py to i Condon 



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9tt] -ndent 

f 
Monthly Kepcrt for 

problcaa on ""ecentbar 4* At this c , 

kittaas. Maynard 13 arrows, otto . , 

- 
bar 5, ar: 
held. 

■ 
raanca award i , rison. v e 

•ash allowance-. 

. rof. 

of tics fron 

pictures* 

fi&~ 2 

. 
inst tt~ 

i reeonmen is. 

tit. 

The Yellowstone atrl 
at 9 1 00 A..-/i. eac ..- an-: 

Maa&oth Protc , . on 

the evenii- . . :! ng 

the serviv . 

. 
■onth and on 1 , 

a the . 

This saae group had a Mire show on th 

whici; t ' ovles depict ' shown* Un- 

fortunately, these saovies ware not > 












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jpar-.erYioe JM 

3 from t of four 1 

Service Train! i. 
era. 

'e Uenegeoent , . 

f Par!. in 

,ra» an 
n»nt us . 

rintendent'e 
Mati ice on 

it waa 

* of 1958, e . 'e do. 

plana Tor tr thin their u. 

early in January. 

- 
.la two hour tr eorrea r 18 

in the Cox see room. 

. I6aia 
tc the ? vi school in *; . 

Yellowstone were n school, 

. 

^ ^ 

Clerk" for 

40 hours an 

■a was on duty all month* 
except for £0 usual leave 1 . » 

was on duty t 
rs snn 
wxalist George . arler was on &• 

- 
neti ■ other -nel «h »• 

Chief Park Natum 

ns for - ij 
latv; - itions luring t 

be up- . is of t 3. 

^~^~^2 BEXeSSI 

. rotarj in 

Livingston was i t's offloe a] 

with com ie ini" Lon on 
terraces at . He was loanc 

• . t ■ - : i 

expects to prt>par* articles • 



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... 

otor &i 
i. . \ . j picti . ^ wen tarn I . . 

ie 5 been : 

lu ad ml refinements to be in it I 

r 

eir tw r - : : 

iesin. 
let . 
Fall 

jttesticne 
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tseune. 



:eeaber 5 • a sap c 

.ceuraev ai 
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t inttrc: rts g ore obe , 

leer t.etor 

een si 

Gclien-oye were ol on Ie; 

r etrc bove t 

r« ob*i , 

wan ban -.. :: -: . r- r.ccJ.l : 'z :~ w II . * 

• 3 vert 



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. . . " ;oT\ t was la 

)Icturt otor m 

tello*3tcne% 1 >a were . 11 to t . 

Iia club an-5 to t "le Club, 

r 13 Ch 
ie hat been e to an 

las adiiticn&l refinements to in It ber 

Interpretive n* 

oercbor n took 

Jcouts ■ sir tw< LI* 

lasin* 

totur rs took t I on ? . ni; or/er 

? all 
flzestione ani shewed saovies to tl I ' I ~s* 

vere ftflsd th* 

Sati : . . |j& 

'erk • 

E fli—ua Act 

A request v, 
if Additional 

3 of accea teens* 

Ft 

9f 

i 
ra at 

Suaeune* 

■ ■ 
in December 5. At that t 
ic curacy an I cor 
x;r an-1 1c 
jf li : is wore observed 

Jlfccr area | aeon i i 

Jan?- . an wc r Elver • 

vjcllon-oya were observe- on Yellowstone Lake i 
Jest . . an! four ' -te 

! 
Wre o\ 

nlei with cr lore b .. 

an 5 , in t 

1th h . 
>wan b 
■anntr. .ere r 



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Maryland and et the month's clo: 
that the bir la m 

v hen, 

lists 

'en, ■ ^ 

*ain e r on t 

3 area. This mi 1 was to r, 

the Mayor's Guidebook. 

m 
was in 

uffelo jaws from e 
ore heads f I 

1st , 

in »rch study on the 

The Opal 

driv up completely 01 »r 21 «u of 

faiuvea tion, 
ranewei its act . , &WGd 

act Lve. 

rej ial act 

basir; area unt 

pftasibli vehicle. , 

• r; - 

. Mr, 
December ; . 

aal fe< i a v ir: 

the vie 

of vapor, 

■* ■ 

four were 

ems an abundance of 

(teubtedly t 

runoffs e. 

Park . iiat John „ 

sty field trip 
following in etlon a ;>» 

17, 3 

o 

.'*.ncr • 

Snowshoe Cabin, 
fiallrsaring Creek was 



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auger tatioa. The third !r :-, 

1m Tellowc . 

Ik were classtf iol on t le tr owes 

■ slope* of Cottonwoo . 

were onweod 

[ellowston* aivar below Cottonwoc k* It 

;ri ; la t -at I became noi-* iaant , 

led an opportunity t m «or< 

• 

Ir le&iers on a hike 
>ighorn roiaa, 7 ewes an i 1 lamb on 

r t esj 

fawn aj id 1 

a 



ie lellowe: 
Kurini a mont:. 

eceat . 

„ mmm , — 3 

.— — — 

•»«.- ... . 



JL ty . 

leameX 
Iheul- 

tn an atteia 

&e 2fev.» c, : 
Hecoab . 



rton v 
month kept the books 
locossiorr # 

■ 
jsoclation e c 

JSuseua A 
stural 



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L^p^nt and : v 



ionth t 3 were in 

'bul • This i.net* . - ' ty 

nacessarv t 
d en 13 • 

B^tc r ...ic .' ..aual 



. ■ new 

bov3c ns w * 

se proviewln "lira made notes is 

mticipe J ite in J . 

The t ' A was 

•krooa work, 
the Park for rri8oii| uts of 

Mrer f i pre 
I 2ity an 

: . albums and ' 

nogstiv. 
v: se . ao 

A gJ : enlax 

s 
rnla on & .:. 

t to t 



, 



Condon 
file 
museum 
Reeding Copy 
DConlon/svg 



1960) 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

(Park or Office) 




O -n 

50 F 

o" m 

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n 



03 

rn 

70 



PLEASE RETURN THIS FILE PROMPTLY TO 



MONTHLY REPORTS, NATURALIST DIVISION 



1958 



(Activity) 



IMPORTANT 

ile constitutes o part of the official records of the 
J ark Service and should not be separated or papers 
l without express authority of the official in charge. 
lis and employees will be held responsible for 
observe these rules, which are necessary to pro- 
ntegrity of the official records. 




" 9 5 



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w 'el ,*uary 5, 
civ: 

r Janu , 

■peela! Activities and f . orJTer^ncea 

■ ■ i i i 1 1 1 1 1 

The Chief 
Qarrison*s of 
Tillage i • 
West Thumb th. 

on -lage. ♦ 

sa ;)s data 
plan at v 
vera prew 

• 
Par). 

1 
17. 

uary 11; and at i os were . ilfred . 

A c 
servatj 
was reviewed . . • 311 . 

- 
on Jamjars • 

i was 
27. 
Brown, , , , 

Assistant Lton, 

atural.' >»• 

as 

wrii 

aso ar -jrized 

changes or • 

aeetin, w 

21. 



^— — iiiw ■ m i n i ■m» > M Mww n h pi hww i hi n i wmihh w 

* 
'3 of . 

expaoftioi 

1th 1 s close 

t 

tk Jertnin :s» 

» of 

t 

Van wont 

■ , 
iona in t . 

At 

... 

Nmoni ;l 

■i 

of annual leave, 

anr' ?. . 

Par 

Park Natural. 

loavo taken en 1. 

aonth Bxcor ! ... on -.' • 

• 
and the a 



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—— ■ I I I 1 1 I ■ I I .1 1. ■ I » 

t 

ith's clos® 
in . 

' » of 

Tral." ' t * 

trips 9 and war© is. 

ions in t 3. 

Pa- 
at 
ton, . • 

ati 

Qflg| 

Par 

of annual leave. 

annual 7. . • 

Par / . 

Park '^aturaii 

leave taken on 1, - 

aonth axcer-t in •. 

- 
and tho an 



sine 

uraliat v 
retary 

- • 

i 1 1 i - - ■■ i t i i m i i ii i - - -■■ - i mi 

pre. .alks. 

■"5ar< . 

were 2: , 

on i 

s aaxmc; - 

Puri 

M 

\iry cc. 
we:'^. froawn a .. s;.i.n;-3u tc . - w'arda hai ^-al 

- > i • 

follows* 

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trtan 

in 1 

turn or . 

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area* ml # 

assaot ol 

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The 
Par , 

Cthar lark 
in answar . 

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Bat. :rrJ. 



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-_ <m .aade v 

I • iadt i ., . 

annu<; 

l"ll'r-i : - z Lil-ror ? esuw iseoeiaJ •■:: ..v.- .", ; •.. , -;sbh l # 

Ai 

on 1 . 

. 
♦ la attendance at 1 

, . . . 

find a let! 

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port or. Inter . 



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file 
museum 
Reading Copy 
DCondon : svg 



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^erinton lent March 11. 

Chief Park Naturalist 

Monthly for Petor 195^ 
>cial ;,otiYit ■•, :■■■ Conferences 



faliet Tyers, a member of t 
etings of this corned ttee on February 5, 10 
>artioipated in the antelooo count which was me 1a on February 20, 

Arrangements ware male with 
iign for the Lost Falls nature trail at 
o repaint jyaer sit;ns for y and > rs» 



. 



z Conion at1 
•rriaon's office on February U» 

A study was aaie of t 'a finance 

pportionoent i.epcrt was planned ar , 

fXtalOW Soryioee sj£ , ... U^e 

The Yellowstone Batl 
Shurch Schoci . . 

ervices ct 10:CX) a.ra, Kov, Jac) a cos 

wbruary* 



Park List Tyers i in 

ha Conference Room on February 21, 

•the is Training Course I , , 3« fror « 

aturrlist Conion wes on special assi .:©. 

srsonnel 

Park un was on duty all sionth "rom 

•brutry 8 through the month in 'ice at lska. Park 

turalist 3eal was on iut ?r six hours an: n on 

•bruary 2/,. He attended the [&ise\ urge i d 

returned to the P&rk on February 13. rs was 

onth and Park Natui , on iuty ,11 : -., 

hirley Va; sr was also «, tonth. 

The Per sonnc _oe lias been ree 

oaiticn and at the iaonth*e close . 

ight vacancies hawe now the se T f 

nd action will be taken early in ♦ 















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4 
























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The Yellowstone Park 16am aovies with 
41 interpretive prograias y >aont. , r » -mnt 

ogion Five office la Phillielphla fos , nta 
osa, California line a copy of "Your Yellowstone" and ";.',' n»* was 
ent to Mr* I cbert J. Jonas cf Moscow, o# 

ark" b? the For I Motor Co. wee els > 

1 office and used the "Your ' ;3tone» movie te 113 

Pc: ^ in a1 ing 

ehool in Nasi . C. from January 13 ihr 

The iiorwss dJepiotin, ' the 

xhibits to be installed in the new Canyon V. 
hanges which are to bo nadw« 

It wai tv ■ 

1 ■]© exhibits would, be a star- ■ 

ould be 30" above gj 

isignin*: the st. structure to b * 

Par ,1st X: 

Eds that were acquired in 19 • 

The jnuseua basement was r^ Ln- 

tallstion has ap proved t , new 

witches and outlet plugs which 
lectr'eal ec,uipnent ts # 

Wt ! -' j^ttrwatiea 

Dr. Jessop £ # Low of the Utah Co 
tah was in the close e raonth to pick 

hich had been collected fron so rs» 

• Low is vsinc efceriaJ ln©< :o in a 

ffects of flourine on wildlife* 

Par orgs , 

entana on February 21 as part esearc 

s obtained o rablo r, >nos conce 

the early 1900*8, Ho also ®xe _ ' -3 hes 

he thermal features* 

Copies of t . s were 

ancroft Libr i , 

February 1 o. 
on observed a bobt*. „ 



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EIGP 

The Tallowstone Park Research lib 
ftaff during the aonth and ae\ t books, 

aotual acccunt of tiie use of this 1 1958 

as follows s 

Magaain^s———— -——«-— — — ——-»—«.- .• — «——«x5 
PaaphletB'"—-— •■*—*•— •• —« •-— -.—-«. «.«-«- ■»«•»• «.«mmmm 
Books on Indefinite Lo ..■..— ——«-—— .————.— i 
BookB check out— — 



The January-February 
•mplotel and mailed out to 337 subscribers 
Deal eaployeee* Twelve (12) oultilith masters v 
rture Notes cover a* 

&re# Bertha friiarton eontlnut 
large number of kodaalides , 

The storage cheat fox 
Leted during th; 

MftWP^c ^... 

Twelve 8x10 glossy prints • on, 

ontana for use in Illustrating r. b- 

xtyfive 8x10 glossy mts we o in t 
Dnth end 68 4x5 contact prints 
Bniel T, Pott* ra were processc , 

There was a aixup on kc 38 sent on loan to & 
sllowatone receiving Rainier 1 » s2J sler receivir 
as cloorad up and b\ the asaftb' Lowstone had their ow , 



. ?on 



>py to i Condon 

Piles / 

o ^ 
Reading Copy 

bnionisvg 



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Superintendent April 3 » l958 

Chief Park ;Jaturallst 

Monthly Report for March, 1953 

Special Activities and Conferences 

Park Naturalist Tyers was appointed to a caamittee which is investigating 
tospital insurance plana. This committee net on March 24 and 28. 

Park Haturalist Condon returned to Yellowstone on March 1 from his assign* 
sent to the Region Two Office in Omaha, Nebraska. lie served as Acting Superin- 
tendent on (die 4th, 5th and 12tu of the vaoat.fr. A considerable portion of his 
tine during the month of March was spent in catching up on back work and in ret- 
rieving correspondence, memoranda, and other materials. A good part of one day's 
cine was devoted to careful study of the correspondence being carried on by the 
>lrector's offica with the National Park Association, the Wilderness Society, 
the Sierra Club and other conservation groups. 

A proposed itinerary for a guided trip to be given tho Student Conservation 
Program group from Grand Teton National Park was worked up and sent to them. 

lellgiou Services and Chapel \Ss& 



The Yellowstone national Park Chapel was used for the regular Church school 
services at 8:00 a. a. each Sunday morning and for tho Protestant church services 
jkt 10:00 a.m. The Rev. Jack Jennings conducted the Protestant services on each 
}t the fivti oundays during the month. The chapel was used for choir practices 
■luring the latter part of the month. 

a- Service Training 



Park Naturalists Baal, Tyers and Condon presented a two day training see 
for twelve park rangers and several others who visited the sessions. This train!? 
Us held on March 17 and 13 and the sessions dealt with the interpretive program 
ind interpretive techniques as used In Yellowstone and elsewhere. 

Chief Park naturalist Condon attended an In-Service Training program on 
performance ratings on Thursday, March 27, 1958. 

tersonae l 

Park naturalist Baal was on duty all month. Park Naturalist Tyers was on 
uty all month except for five hours sick leave taken on March ft and four hours 
ick leave taken on March 28. Park Naturalist George D. .larler was on duty 
11 month. Clerk-Stenographer Shirley Van Gilder was on duty all month except 
or 4 hours sick leave taken on March 6 and 8 hours sick leave taken on /larch 7. 
hlef Park naturalist Condon was on duty all month. 






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The Poation Description for the Clerk-Stenographer job in the Chief Perk 
aturaiist's office was re-described and will become a Secretary-Stenographer, 
JSS-5 position. This was cleared by the Region Two Office on March 21 and the 
personnel office is recruiting for this position. The potation Descriptions 
fat up-grading the Park Naturalist GS-7 to a GS-9 and the Park Naturalist G3-9 
to a GS-11 ware completed and submitted to the Region for review and classifi- 
cation. 

On March 10 Park Naturalists Condon, Seal and Tyers worked with Mr. Henry 
Pratt of the Personnel Office on the grading of applications for park ranger 
ixaturalict positions. 



icxoos ox ei.J.Kie&v* tor pwt* nuxs* iiatutaxitit poBiuww ana imkmp m wisgciou 
: six persons to fill vacancies. These are: 

Mr. Thomas E. Morledge Mr. Richard C. Townsend 

Mr. Donald S. Chipmaa Mr. Robert S. Whitmire 

Mr. Gilbert R. Mage* Mr. Douglas B. McHenry 

One hundred copies of THE NATIONAL PARK WILD2RNESS were sent out to 
former park ranger naturalists, present park ranger naturalists and to other 
persons interested in the National Park program. 

A register of eligibles for the Museum Curator position was supplied dur- 
ing the month and three persons were approached with respect to their availability, 
Correspondence was sent to Mr. Jesse I*. Nusbaum of Region Three Office concern- 
lag Mr. John E. Engmanson. Mr. Musbaum reported very favorably on Mr. Engcaaas on, 
land he was offered the Museum Curator GS-5 position on March 27 with instructions 
to report for duty as soon bb possible. 

Interpretive Services 

Park Naturalists Condon, Beal and Tyers held a conference on March 21 for 
{the purpose of reviewing the interpretive program o£ 1957 and determining what 
alterations should be made in It for the 1933 season. Several changes have 
been planned and the program for the 1953 season will be worked up in final form 
early in April. 

Park Naturalist Merrill D. Beal presented a special program to the Optimist 
Club in Soseman, Montana on March 27. There were 35 persons present. 



Condon presented a program at the Yellowstone National Park's G5th Birthday 
Party which was presented at a combined meeting of the Rotary, Lion's and Kiwanis 
clubs of Livingston. There were 215 people in attendance. 

Nation pictures used for interpretive purposes in March were as follows: 

Title User Showinga Attendance 



rOUR YELLOWSTONE Clarence C. Alleman 4 2,560 

rOOR YELLOWSTONE Ted Weight 3 64« 



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1 SMHTX09 ttttl 

I 

■lit"- S*' I 

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Title User Attending 

BIRDS OF YELLOWSTONE Robert J. Jonas 2 9C 

WILD ANIMAL HEAVEN TV station la Thermopolis, 

Wyoming 1 unknown 

The 16mm novie YOUR YELLOWSTONE vac sent on loan to Mr. Svald S. Srickson 
at 925 Highland Avenue, Groans burg, Pennsylvania for use in presenting a pro- 
gran in the Veteran's hospital there. 

Museum Activities and Exhibits 

Park Naturalists, Deal, Tyera and Condon spent the day of March 6 reviewing 
carefully the Interpretive Development Outline before Its final typing. Park 
Naturalists Tyers and Baal carefully reviewed the entire proposed program to 
be sure that Mr. Condon, In preparing it, had made no ©amissions. Park Naturalist 
Tyers has worked up the interpretive toaster plan sheet on interpretive develop- 
ments shoving the location of various interpretive facilities. Clerk- S fcanogrtpoer 
Shirley Van Gilder is typing this in its final form at the month's close. 

Park naturalist Condon worked whenever possible during the month on the 
Museum Prospectus for the Prjrk, and a partial rough draft of this has been 
completed for review. Park Naturalists Beal and Tyers have been requested to 
review copies as it has been prepared. 

Park Naturalist Beal had devoted considerable time to the assembling of 
materials for use in the preparation of the exhibits for the Canyon Visitor 
Center. A number of photographs and specimens are not yet available and 
these must be obtained by or before '.lay 15. 

Research and Observation 



Park Naturalist George D. Marler has been working all month on the thermal 
area research and has submitted reports on the Castle Geyser and its activities, 
the Splendid Geyser and its activities, and one on the Daisy and its activities. 
Ha began making trips to the geyser basins along the Pirehoie on March 26 and 
has been continuing his field observations since that date. 

Orders ware placed for wairs to be used in the thermal studies for measuring 
the volume of water being discharged by the various hot springs. 

Park Naturalist John A. Tyers accompanied the Snow Survey Team on a field 
trip around the main loop road and to Sylvan Pass. The trip occupied the period 
from March 2 through the 5th. Mr. Tyers made field observations and obtained 
black and white and colored pictures and 16mm movies. He reports having seen 
17 bison in Haydea Valley, 25 trumpeter swan on the Yellowstone River and at 
the Lake outlet, several coyotes including one bobtailed one, two bull bison 
near Pelican Creek and two bull bison near Mary Bay. 

Park Naturalist Condon prepared an article on vandalism entitled Man and 
Geysers and this was submitted to Mr. Edmund B. Rogers for publication in the 
periodical prepared by the Colorado State University at Fort Collins. 



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Park Naturalist Condon devoted considerable time to a careful review 
of a manuscript prepared by Winston S. Banko on the trumpeter even. This is 
to be published la the north American later Fowl book which is soon to be 
released by the American Ornithology Union. 

On March 21 the complete manuscript for the monograph on trumpeter swan 
which is being written by Mr. Banko was received from 24r. Mackay la Canada. 
Park Naturalist Condon spent the 22nd and 23rd carefully reviewing this menu* 
script and also had Park Biologist Halt Kit tarns examine it. It was sent back 
to Mr. Banko on the 25th with s long memorandum of suggestions and comments 
with respect to it. 

Per the record, we should include here sotue coawants on activitie. 
the Mammoth Hot Spring Terraces. The alua ^..rin^ has continued to be active 
during the winter months at the same location where it was flowing through the 
summer of 1957. The deposition of travertine from the waters has accumulated 
to some degree and has completely filled two of the large crater-like pools. 
During March a heavy flow of water came down over the large terrace front and 
Joined the run-of* from Minerva Spring to add to the voluiae of water flowing 
over the lower portion of the terraces. This development is very interesting 
in view of the unusual trough-like channels which have been developed from the 
deposition of travertine. The Opal Spring which was dormant for a good part 
of the winter was revived in late February and has been slowly increasing in 
its volume of flow and at the close of March it appears that this spring may 
be active again for the 1958 season. It would be unfortunate if the water 
flow does not revive because it has been an unusual attraction for a number 
of years. 

The Highland Springs running along the big rift from Orange Spring Mound 
to the eastern edge of Highland Terrace has been discharging a very large 
volume of water which is gaining access to the surface in several places, 
flow has built up cowe beautiful terraces and pools. It has been unfortunate 
that trenching of the flow and digging up of toe travertine depositions have 
been done in order to keep the road free. If the flow of water from these 
springs vera permitted to flow free without any interruptions, it seems that 
large and beautiful basins, pools and terraces would develops. 

District Park Ranger Elliot Davis brought in copies of some new maps 
{which have been released by the U. S. Army which include Yellowstone National 
Park and its environs. Two copias aach of these maps have been ordered for 
use In the research library. 

Lit— > 

■ ■■inn phi ii i M 

The Yellowstone Park Research T .ibrary has been used extensively by several 
of the Park employees during the meat arch. 

Books received ", 

Magazines 21 

Pamphlets 

Books on Indefinite Loan 64 

Books checked out 



AiMaa 

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Natural History Association 

Mrs. Bertha Wharton has been employed during the month as the Association 
clerk and has worked on the typing of the rough draft of the Museum Prospectus, 
has bound several hundred kodaslides, and has handled the mail sales and kept 
the hooks of the Association. The Association purchased during the month 50 
reams of multilith paper for use in the publication of Mature Motes. Mew metal 
■aster stencils were purchased by the Association for use In multillthing cover 
illustrations to be used on Mature Notes and for other purposes. 

Mr. Sills 2. Gabbert and Thomas Somerville, Jr. audited the Association's 
books for the first time. They made a complete audit and prepared a report 
which was favorable. They indicated that there were e number of minor weaknesses 
in the record keeping of the Association and suggested some improvements* 

The association arranged for the purchase of additional 16am motion picture 
reels, motion picture mailing cases, and also for the purchase of a considerable 
assortment of repair parts for the 16mm Bell & Hovel 1 motion picture projectors. 

The Bureau of Internal Revenue annual report 99C-A covering the operations 
of non-profit organisations was submitted to the Bureau along with a copy of 
the annual report of that association. 

The Association ordered a copy of a l&am motion picture entitled ^^yoming's 
Wealth of Wildlife". It is planned that this will be used frequently as an 
Interpretive program. 



EUfrlpmant and Supplies 

A large quenity of photographic supplies were received during the month 
and have bean placed in the darkroom and photo materials storage cabinets. 

All of the 16om motion picture* projection equipment was thoroughly serviced 
and checked by Park Naturalist/ Beal .and Tyers has been working on the 33mm 
kodaslide projectors. 

A new IBM electric typewriter was received on March 27 and has been put 
into use. 

Twelve new megaphones were obtained for issuance to field stations for 
their use while conducting guided trips. A supply of light bulls for the museum 
exhibit cases and museum rooms were obtained. 

During the month two stovepipe traps were made for us by the Plumbing Shop 
and these are being used in an attempt to capture small mammals for mounting 
in the Canyon Visitor Center. 

Photographic and Visual Aids 

Twenty-one glossy 8x10 enlargements vera seat to Mr. Kerry Fuqua of Living- 
ston, Montana for use in the Tmout Derby publication. 



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Park Naturalist Tyars exposed sixty 4x3 negatives. These were processed 
and in addition to them an additional twenty 4x3 negatives taken by Park 
Ranger Burns of Old faithful were develipejeVand printed. Park Naturalist Tyers 
also exposed 250 feet of colored Item motion picture film and two rolls 36 
exposure 35mm film. Park Naturalist Condon exposed 300 feet of 16mm colored 
motion picture fila.ge also exposed six 4x5 negatives and Park Naturalist Beal 
exposed twelve 4x5*3. 

On am STchang* basis 32 duplicate kodaslidee of Yellowstone ware sent to 
Mount Rainier National Park and a like number were received from that Park. 



David da L. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



Copy to: Condon 



Files 
Museum*- 
Reading Copy 
DCondon:svg 



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Chief Park naturalist 

Hoathly Report for April, 1958 

ecial Activities and Conferences 

Ou April 1 Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a conference ia Aasistaat 
perintcndent Hamilton's office on the Bighoie Battlefield developiaent plan, 
ril 2 all of the park naturalists attended a special treating in the Conference 
em which dealt with the planning for the Grant Village development and other 
vol operants contemplated Tor the Park. 

Mr. Fred Martin of the Park Co. News was at tfaumoth on April 3 and at 
at time was given a large number of 3 x 10 glossy prints .or use in the prepar- 
Lon of a special Yellowstone edition of the Park Co. 'Jews. 

During early April considerable time was devoted by the Chic . Park !atura- 
»t In completing estimates for the Division operations for the 1960 fiscal year. 
mm were turned over to Administration Officer Anderson on April 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon served as Acting Assistant superintendent 
April 5 through the 15th. 

Park iaturalists Condon and Tyers attended a npecial meeting of the Boating 
ittee on April 3. 



Ob April 10 a special inspection was mama of the bridge construction pro- 
:t at the stta of the lower bridge near Gardiner. Some suggestions were made to 
t Project Engineer and the contractor's superintendent with respect to the geoi 
the area and the danger of road collapse unless extreme caution was used ia 
avations and work being done in the alluvial fill at the bridge site. 

teou. District Hanger Lea Berg and Sub-district '-anger Louis Guazel on an iaspee- 
n tour of the geyser basins along the Pirehole River to determine sites where 
man walks might be best placed. Information on the location of these walks was 
ided Mr. LeBoy Wohlbrandt. 

On April 16 Chief Park naturalist Co n don and Landscape Architect •iattson 
scted the sites for 14 parking areas along the Tower .'all-'lammoth road and 
being constructed with waste materials from the landslide area at Phantom Lake. 

Chief Park Natural ist London attended the Chamber of Commerce dinner at 
on April 17. Ha attended a special staff meeting on April 17 and special 
ferences in the Superintendents office on the 17th with respect to the bear 
»lem and soil and moisture projects. 



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da April 17 Chio£ Park Naturalist Condon made arrangements Cor Dr. IU D. 
al of Idaho State Collage and the Dean of the College of Fine Arts to come to 
llowstone on May 2 for a conference dealing with historical research which laight 
done on Baghole Battlefield national Monument. Oa April 23 Chief Park Natura- 
Bt Condon reviewed the plana for a proposed Lake-Fishing Bridge area development 
i prepared a rather lengthly aowrandum of comments on this. 

Park Natural ists Beal and Tyers prepared special loemorandums and suggestions 
the location and improvements of wooden walks in thermal areas. 

Park Naturalist Tyers served actively on the Boating Committee and on the 
3pital Plan Committee. He attended meetings of these committees on April G and 
rll 22. 

.igious Services and Chapel Use 

The Yellowstone National Pari: Chapel was used for the regular church school 
rvices each Sunday at 9:00 a.m. and for the regular church services at 10:00 a. a. 

A special Caster service was held in the chapel at 6:00 a.m. on April 6 
i this was followed by a coffee hour in the canteen and the;: an Caster Sgg hunt 
the chapel lawn for the children. 

The Rev. Jack Jennings was gone on vacation and to a special meeting of 
ministers involved in the Student Ministry in the National Pa ram April 
rough April 24. During his absence on April 13 students from ; itana btate 
Liege at Boseman conducted the church services and on April 20 Bishop Sterling 
Her of the Itontaaa Diocese of the Episcopal Church conch services . 

A meeting of the Superintendent's Church Coon held in the Chief 
Naturalist's office on April 15 and those in attendance were as fol 
Tom Milligan, Mr. Houston Turner, Mr. Joseph Kurts and Mr. Dave Condon. Mr. 
was elected by the group to serve as chairman of the committee rs. 
ligan was elected to serve as secretary* treasurer. The committee requested that 
|j chairman prepare letters to the Superintendent asking that projects be included 
the Government development work plan for the installation of new flooring in the 
1, for restrooma, and for re finish! an the pews. These memos were prepared and 
tted to the superintendent. 

'Service Training 

Park Naturalist Beal assisted by Park Naturalist Tyers presented two In- 
rice training movies to 35 employees in the canteen building on April 11. The 
:les of these movies vara "A Day in Court and 'Versatility Unlimited 4 . 

rsonnel 



Park Naturalist Condon was on duty all month except far four hour~ annual 
»e taken on the 3rd and 13th. Park Naturalist Beal was on duty all month. 

laturalist Tyers was on duty all month and Park Naturalist Marlor was on duly 
month except -or eight hours annual leave taken on April 14. Cleric-stenographer 
Lrley Van Gilder was on duty all month. 









I 















Position No. 13 occupied by Park 'naturalist Deal was up-graded from a 
>9 to a GS-ll on April 6 and Position No. 12 occupied by Park Naturalist Tyers 
i up-graded on this seas date from a GS-7 to a GS-9. Chief Park Naturalist 
idon spent the better part of the day of April 9 discussing the performance 
:ings with Park naturalists Seal, Tyers and Marler. 

Arrangements were made to hire Mr. John S. Ingmanson as a liuseum Curator, 
•5. Mr. Ingmanson's reporting date was delayed until May 19 so that he could 
m>lete his requirements for a Ph. D. degree in Anthropology at the University 
Arizona in Tuscon. 

On April 23 a Position Description was prepared for a G3-3 Clerk-Stenographer 
be hired on a temporary basis to assist Park Natusalist George D. Marler with 
rical work associated with his research studies. This was turned over to the 
•sonne 1 Office and we are awaiting action with respect to the selection of someone 
do this work. Attempts were made throughout the month to get Personnel to 
lure a classified applicant for the Secretary-Stenographer, 03-5 position in the 
Lef Park Naturalist's office. At the month's close no satisfactory candidates 
I been obtained although Miss Beverly Dai lew of Grand Teton was contacted but 
fclined. 

A selection was made of additional park ranger naturalists during the 
lith since vta. A. Moore and Mr. Torraey who had been selected declined. Mr. 

and and Mr. SI las on were selected to fill these two vacancies and Mr. Tod 
tkamen, a former seasonal park ranger naturalist was selected to fill another 
iltion in the Interpretive Division. 

On April 25 station assignment*.- for personnel on the Interpretive eta 
re firmed up and a memorandum of assignments and quarters will be issued early 
May. 

:erpretive i^crvicea 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon gave a special talk to 10 students of the 
Iho State College on April 3. 

Movies were shown to the members of the Mammoth community on the 8th of 
i month. The titles of these movies were "Animals Unlimited" and "teaming 's 
^lth of Wildlife". There were 162 people present for the showing of these movies. 

Park naturalist Beal spent April 3 and 4 with Dr. Pulling and 10 students 
a the Idaho State College. Biologist '"alter Kit tarns also devoted sorae time to 
s group. 

The 16cm movie 'Tour Yellowstone 1 ' was used by Mr. Svald Eric! a pre- 
lng a program to 300 people in Pennsylvania. This same movie was also used 
Grand Teton national Park as part of an In-Service training program. 

The Interpretive Development Outline was conpleted in what we hope will 
its last draft for seme time and this was turned over to the Superintendent for 
lew and approval. Copies were sent on to the Director's office, L'OOC, and the 
;ion TwooQdfice. 

Activities and Sxaibits 

Portions of the museum prospectus were reviewed with superintendent 



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drrisoa on April 3 and as opportunity presented itself work has been done on 
|rthering the prospectus plans. 

Park naturalist Beal spent considerable time during the month of April 
i sembllng, labeling, and packing exhibit materials for use in the museum section 
the Canyon Visitor Center. On April 17 nine (9) cases of material were shipped 
i d they weighed 605 pounds. In addition to the cases of materials shipped, a 
number of photographs, documents and other items were also sent to the 
tern Museum Laboratory. 

Park Naturalists Beal, Tyers and Condon worked up copy for interpretive 
to be placed at the Upper Falls, Brink of the Lower Fails, Lookout Point, 
View Point, Inspiration Point, at other stategic points along the Canyon 
i, and at the blowdown area near Leiiardy Rapids. Park Naturalist Condon worked 
the text for use on a new sign at the Washburo-Doane party campsite at lladison 
tction. 

A number of specimens were collected for use in the Canyon Visitor Center 
um section during April. These consisted of a California gull, osprey, golden- 
it le ground squirrel, pika, chipmunk, northern violet -green swallows, and a 
zzly bear family. The family o ily bear were collected on April 30 and 
.1 be taken to Jonas Brothers in Denver, Colorado on May 5. These animals were 
at the Quick Freeze bftfemY Plant in Livingston, Montana and will be taken 
over in a frozen state. 

Park Naturalist Tyers worked up a proposed exhibit plan for the Apollinaris 
rings and submitted this on April IS. 

Park Naturalists Beal and Tyers made pictures of a white-footed mouse mA 
&rat for use in the exhibits at Canyon. 

0a April 29 Park Naturalist Tyers prepared the Masnoth Museum -or opening 
the public on May 1. He removed the covers from all the exhibit cases and 
sred the stagecoaches on the museum porch. 

Park Naturalists Beal and Tyers worked on exhibit plans for the exhibit 
Otter Creek on the Nez Perce raid, and for the Hayden Valley Overlook. 

and Observation 

ii ii •— <~ 

On April 5 the Protection Division determined that it was desirable to 
Liate "Baxter 1 , a large brown-colored black bear that has frequented the area 
m Obsidian Cliff and Mammoth for the past 14 years. This animal had become 
Lsance around Mammoth and after being hauled away several times, there seemed 
be no other alternative left except to dispose of him. 



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Copies of some of the research papers on the . Urot.is study being made 
a group of scientists in Utah were provided to us by Dr. Greenwood for our 
irch library on April 8. 

District Banger lit Davis reported seeing a goose with an orange neckband 
Mary Bay on April 14. He also reported seeing the first sandhill crane on that 
Other interesting dates for bird arrivals were - osprey in the Gardner 
on April 5, California gulls on Yellowstone River on April 28, osprey in 
canyon area on April 14. A great grey owl was observed at Mary Bay on April 
and on this same date twenty-two adult western willets were observed in that area. 



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Garrison on April 3 and as opportunity presented itself work has been done on 
furthering the prospectus plans. 

Park Naturalist Beal spent considerable tine during the month of April 
assembling, labeling, and packing exhibit materials for use in the auseum section 
of the Canyon Visitor Center. On April 17 nine (9) cases of material were shipped 
and they weighed 60S pounds. In addition to the cases of materials shipped, a 
large number of photographs, documents and other items were also sent to the 
Eastern Museum Laboratory. 

Park Naturalists Beal, Tyers and Condon worked up copy for interpretive 
signs to be placed at the Upper Falls, Brink of the Lower Falls, Lookout Point, 
Crand View Point, Inspiration Point, at other stategic points along the Canyon 
rim, and at the blowdown area near LeHardy Rapids. Park Naturalist Condon worked 
up the text for use on a new sign at the Washburn-Doane party campsite at Madison 
Junction. 

A number of specimens were collected for use in the Canyon Visitor Center 
museum section during April. These consisted of a California gull, osprey, golden- 
ma.itle ground squirrel, pika, chipmunk, northern violet-green swallows, and a 
grJssly bear family. The family of gristly bear were collected on April 30 and 
wi? I be taken to Jonas brothers in Denver, Colorado on '.ay 5. These animals were 
frozen at the Quick Freeze Locker Plant in Livingston, Montana and will be taken 
to Denver in a frozen state. 

Park Haturalist Tyers worked up a proposed exhibit plan for the Apolliaaris 
Springs and submitted this on April 18, 

Park :3aturalists Beal and Tyers made pictures of a white-footed mouse oil 
a muskrat for use in the exhibits at Canyon. 

On April 29 Park Naturalist Tyers prepared the Mammoth Museum for opening 
to the public on May 1 . lie removed the covers from all the exhibit cases and 
uncovered the stagecoaches on the museum porch. 

Park naturalists Baal and Tyers worked on exhibit plans for the exhibit 
tter Creek on the ilea Perce raid, and for the Hayden Valley Overlook. 

Research and Observation 



On April 5 the Protection Division determined that it was desirable to 
eliminate " Baxter , a large brown-colored black bear that has frequented the area 
between Obsidian Cliff and Mammoth for the past 14 years. This animal had became 
a mi sauce around Mammoth and after being hauled away several times, there seemed 
to be no other alternative left except to dispose of him. 



Copies of soma of the research papers on the flurosis study being made 
by a group of scientists in Utah were provided to us by Dr. Greenwood for our 
research library on April 3. 

District Ranger £lt Davis reported seeing a goose with an orange neckband 
ary Bay on April 14. He also reported seeing the first sandhill crane on that 
lake. Other interesting dates for bird arrivals were - osprey in the Gardner 
Canyon on April 5, California gulls on Yellowstone River on April 23, osprey in 
the canyon area on April 14. A great grey owl was observed at Mary Bay on April 
30 and on this same data twenty-two adult western willets were observed in that area. 



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An Asaorican raven was observed constructing a nest at Golden Gate on April 1 
feed established nesting by April 8. The bird was still on her nest on May 1. A 
young bald eagle has been frequenting the area between the water gaging station 
above Chittenden Bridge and Alum Creek and it is apparently feeding on the ducks 
In that general area. Three American golden eagle ware observed on April 29 la 
the vicinity of the Hud Volcano by Park statural is ts Condon and Beal on a field 
trip into Hayden Valley. On this same date Park Maturalists Condon and Beal saw 
a profusion of wildlife. They observed elk at Roaring Mountain, :>outu Twin Lake, 
a>mph Lake, and near Itorria Junction. There were a large number of bull bison 
scattered through Hayden Valley. Eight osprey were observed between Chittenden 
Bridge and Alum Creek. Nine grizzly bear were seen in Hayden Valley; hundreds 
of Canada geese and eleven pair of Trumpeter swan. There were eight coyotes near 
the Trout Creek dump and a number of others were observed at other points in 
Hayden Valley and near Mary Bay. Redwing Blackbirds, Brewers Blackbirds, Killdeer 
aau two pair of sandhill crane were also observed. 

An incident of unusual interest occurred at Elk Antler Creek. A large 
bull moose was observed running up the east side of Yellowstone River and he was 
immediately followed by a smaller bull moeae which in turn was closely pursued by 
a large female grizzly bear. The lead moose went on up the river and iato the 
stream; the moose in the rear plunged into the river and came directly across to 
the mouth of Elk Antler Creek where wermere stopped. The grizzly bear jumped 
right into the river behind the moose and by this time two other grizzlies had 
arrived since they ware in hot pursuit and following the same trail. The bear 
in the river observed us and turned back but the moose continued on over until he 
was relatively close to us. The bear went back on shore and all three grizzlies 
reared up, ware nervous, milled around awhile and then decided to go back up on 
t a hills to the east. After studying the animals it was concluded that this was 
a emale with three year old bubs. Both moose followed the Yellowstone River 
staying in it and traveled on up the Mud Volcano Area where they were last observed. 

On the evening of April 29 Park Naturalist Condon spent some time at the 
dump ground near Gardiner and at that time saw four grizzly bear. Two of these 
were probably four year old bears and the other two were older animals. ;n the 
30th, a morning dove was observed in the Mary Bay area. 

Park Statural is t Tyers observed two sandhill crane in the slough below 
| Twin Lakes on April 20. Qcuthis same day he observed two osprey along the Cibbon 
River in Gibbon Meadows, two trumpeter swan on the Gibbon River below Terrace 
Spring, and four bull bison were frolicking in the Terrace Spring area. Two 
homed larks ware observed near the Black tail Bear Creek elk trap on April 15. 
On this same day a large bull moose was observed in the insect infestation area 
en the Tower Fall road. The interesting thing about this animal was the fact that 
he did not possess a noticeable wattle, but simply had a tuft of hair or goatee. 
Sow he lost his wattle or did not come to possess one is a mystery. Another bull 
moose was observed this same day in the trees above Tower Fall ranger station. 
He was in rather poor condition and looked gaunt. Both of these bulls had lost 
their antlers, of course, but showed signs of new ones. 

The grizzly bear family collected for the Canyon Visitor Center museum 
section were taken near the Mud Volcano. These animels were eviscerated and taken 
to the Quick Freeze Locker Plant in Livingston, Montana. They were weighed at 
that time and the female weighed 225 pounds and each of the 17 month old cubs 

weighed 71% pounds. It is estimated that the blood loss and organs removed from 

the adult weighed about 40 pounds and this would have her weighing about 265 pounds. 

The organs removed from the cubs weighed probably no more than 15 pound:; making 

them weigh about 86% pounds each. 



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Library 

A set of the old Ilaynes Guide Books were sent to the i I, J.G.S. office ia 
Denver and sons historical books from the research library were also loaned to 
then for their use. An actual account of the use of the Yellowstone Park Research 
Library for the month of April is as follows: 

Books—-—-- —————————— -..-.-6 

Magazines— — — -— 19 

Pamphlets - — - -00 

Books on Indefinite Loan-————-——--—- — —66 
Books checked out— ——————— — —————— —106 

Batumi History Association 

fhe Yellowstone Library and Museum Association sent out ail of its book 
orders on April 1 and by the month's close the majority of these had been received, 
checked, paid for and are now ready for sale and distribution to the field stations. 

This association ordered two (2) copies of a movie from the Uses on the 
JL955 eruption of Kilauea on the Island of Hawaii. 

The Yellows tone Mature Hotes were multilithed, assembled and mailed out 
by April 25. 

Mrs. Bertha Wharton was employed by the association as clerk for the month 
o April. She has handled the book work, associated with the business activities 
and lias also spent considerable time binding kodaslides. 

This association purchased 2000 ffB slide binders for use in preparing 
the kodaslides for the interpretive program. 

Four now Portapage units were purchased and the cost of these were $82.25 
each. A number of 2000 ft. movie reels and shipping cases for XGran movies were 
purchased. 

This association purchased one copy of the 16am colored sound motion 
picture entitled "Wyoming'* Wealth of Wildlife" for the film library. This cost 
the association $130.99. 

A number of parts for use in the maintenance of the Bell & Howell 16mm 
motion picture equipment were purchased. 

Equipment and Suppliff 

Park Naturalist Tyers spent considerable time thoroughly servicing each 
o the eight 35mm Spencer projectors, .lev leather straps for these were prepared 
by Save Pierson and Jim Kimberlin and all of the projectors and cases tan now in 
good order. 

A supply of 100 flash bulbs were obtained and two newV&fe inch lens for 
the spencer projectors were also obtained. h 



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frflEof traphic and Visual Aide 



Mr. Len Serg, District Ranger at Wast Yell ovs tone returned the sat of 
kodas lidos and the projector uhlch were loaned to hies lar.t fall for presenting 
programs in West Yellowstone and adjacent areas. *-!r. Berg reported that no pro- 
grams had been presented by any of the members of the Protection staff. 

Mr. Harvey Reynolds of the Region Two office returned a set of kodaslides 
which were on loan to him. six sets of 50 slides each were added to the field 

Twenty five 3 x 10 glossy enlargement ■ were sent on lc rry 

Tomeras for use in illustrating a book of poems on Yellowstone which he plans to 
publish. 

Darkroom work was done by Park Naturalists Seal and Tyers and consisted 
lie following: film processing • two roels 620 film, sixty 4x5 negai 
126 3 x 10 enlargements and 180 4x5 contact prints. 



David dc L. Condon 
Chief Perk naturalist 

Copy to: Condon 

Files 

Museum * 

Reading Copy 
DCondon:cvg 



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Superintendent JuttC - l * l 953 



Moutaly Report for 2 Icy, 1953. 

ppecial Activities and Conferences 

Oa May 3 * conference was held in the Superintendent*;, e with As**t. 
Lpt. Warren Baailton, Ass't. Chief Sanger Frank Sylvester, Park Naturalist Save 

il, Dr. Sanuel M. Seal, Dr. Stevenson, and Chief Park :iatura jadon 
ittendance. The purpose of this conference was to lay the sround work for a 
cooperative agreement between the :latio;ial Park Service aid t 
or historical research <xi the :*oz Perce Indians and on le Battlefield. 

Mr. Alna Teuscher was in the Chief Park naturalist's office on .lay 3 for 
visit. 

. 'arren 2. Garst, freelance wildlife photographer arrived la the Park 
■ May 8 and has been here throughout the balance o£ the taoath. fir. Garst 
•king 16cm motion pictures of the various species of wildlife a ..icially tlie 
eung of the larger oaanalc, 

On May 19 and 20 the aew projection house at the llauaoth aaraphi theater was 
Biated and the screen housing and backdrop were treated with sta 



Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a conference in. the Superintendents 
sa an May 21. Also in attendance at this conference yere Park E tans, 

kef Hangar Otto Brown, District Sanger Elliot Davis, and 

tlvester. The purpose of this neeting was to discuss the :he 

utbera section of Yellowstone. 



Fifteen parking areas ware finished on the Tower Fall-Mannot ion of 
iad. These were a very aarked addition to this section of road m idoubtedly 

rove pcpular with Park visitors du .*e susnsr oonths. A pro route for a 
^ail, 560 yds. to Wraith Falls, was walked out by the Chief Pari t on 
«y 25. 

Mr. Jaaes Levitt, a school teacher in lUecarta and a bus driver in Yellow- 
one during the sunaer oonths submitted the manuscript copy for a booklet entitled, 
aofcpri.-.t.; in Obsidian' . This was reviewed by Chief Park Mature! 1st Condon and re- 
med to Mr. Levitt with consents. 



Chief Pack Naturalist Condon served as the Act log Super t fron 
to May 28. 



A conference on the Grant Village Development was he! ie Superintendent's 
ee on May 27. Tand B c epa Architect Matteon, Aaet* Chief Ranker ylvestcr, and 
lii1)i" '" ^cra Carry were in att en da nce at this neeting. 



A new operation program for the interpretive Division was made up oa 
May 22. 

Oa Hay 29 Chief Park Naturalist Condon departed for Dinosaur national 
Monument where ho attended the dedication ox the Dinosaur Visitor Center. xitc 
he :cjppod at Teton national Park and delivered books to them for t taral 

Lory Association and conferred with Park Naturalist ilerlia R. Pot I ayae 
Bryant. lie also talked with superintendent Oberhansley. 

Pour trailer houses which will be used by the Interpretive Divii 
quarters for the 1958 season were obtained. Three of these had been established 
on sites in the field at the end of the month. 

|eligiou3 Services and Chapel I .e 

The Yellowstone national Park Chapel was utilized £or Protestant religious 
services each Sunday morning at 10:00 a.m. during the month of May, :Jay 11 was 
last Sunday on which the regular Church School services were held at 9:00 a.u. 
Hie Rev. Jack Jennings functioned as the Protestant minister in charge oj. the aer- 
vices held in the Chapel. 

0a Sunday, lay 18 a special congregational meeting was held and the 
finances of the Winter Ministry Program were discussed. At ti. tg the con- 
gregation voted to donate $IjOC from the '.inter Ministry fund to the building pro- 
gram at the chapel in Gardiner, Montana. 

lay 20 the Summer ry committee met in the c s room of the 
ymi ntstration Bldg. and reviewed the Summer Ministry Program and settled upon a 
Mhedule for the Protests it services at the various field station A che ou 
■oaths. At that time !fr. liuntley Child turned over to Chief Park Naturalist Co 
Chairman of the Superintendent's Church Committee the sum of $646 to be used in 
latablishing memorials at the Yellowstone National Park Chapel in memory of Mr. 
-chols and Mr. C. A. Hamilton. 

Special automobile permits and lodging tickets were issued to the Lattcr- 
)cy faints elders from St. Anthony, Idaho and to the Roman Catholic priests Iron 
5ody, V>yoming. These were sent out to those respective denominational groups on 
toy 20. 

The church services schedule was worked up by the Chairman of the Church 
pocnaittee and submitted to Mr. Joe Dill, Yellowstone Park Company printer, at the 
Month's close. These church services announcement** bulletins will be posted through- 
xit the Perk early in June. 

;n- crvice Training 



On May 1 and 2 Mr, Baruc facDonald, rom th anal Office 

Led the activities associated with the Snow Survey Operations tr , school 
n Yellowstone. 

The Protection Division held a Sanger Conference trai. 
headquarters during the period -ay 5 through lay 14. Chief Park Naturalist Cond 
•■ducted the rangers on a guided trip over the lot pring Terraces on 'lay 14 as 
tot of this training program. Pork lateral lot Deal attended the Sanger Tr 
ference on the afternoon of May 14. 



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Personnel 

Park naturalist John A. Tyoro was on duty all month except for 80 hours 
annual leave taken May 5-16. . . Tyers terminated his services aa a Park Maturai 
in Yellowstone on May 31 by transfer to Mt. Sainier National Park as a Pari Nstura- 

-v. Park statural is t Merrill D. Deal was on duty all month and Chief Park 
Haturaiiiit Condon was also on duty all month. Clerk-, tcao Shirley Van Gilder was 

:uty all oonth except for 3 hours annual leave taken :iay 8 and 2 hour.: sick 
leave taken May 20. Mr. John 3. Ingmanson reported in on May ID terod 
duty jxy 19 as Museum Curator, OS-5, a permanent position in the Interpretive 
jion. Mr. Ingmanson has been on duty the balance of the month. 

All of the selected park ranger naturalists were advised nc to their 
fiportins dates by special letters and memoranda on May 12. jcile or 
has employed as Librarian for the YLMA, arriving here on May 17 and entering on 
doty May 19. Mrs. Bertha Wharton continued the function ns cler: 

The final selection of personnel was made on May 20 at which time 
Paul D. Sebeata, :ir. Sylvan U. Wall r. Donald Greer wera selected. 

An attempt was made to obtain the services of Mr. Lou- 
naturalist to oucceed Mr. Tyere, but he declined the opportunity to t . 
sad plans to teach school. 

An attest was made through the Personnel Office to obtain a clerk-t: 
[to work on the thermal research work with George D. Marler, but at the 
close no one was available. 

Mr. George D. Marler was on duty all month except for 8 hour ^ave 
I 24 hours annual leave taken during the month. 

A farewell party was held in the Museum Bids, for Mr. 
Ac afternoon of May 28. At that time light refreshments war to a number 

>f Iyer's friends and working associates and he was presented with th® community 
;ift consisting of a small picture. The members ,. Interpretive Di n pro- 
Meted Mr. Iyer's with a copy of the Field Guide to Rocks and Minerali id with 
\ copy of "Cubby in yonder land" for his son r his e 

eeny. 



lilOMl 



During the month several seeeonals entered on duty and they were as 

Thad W. Stevens / 4 

Ted J. Parkinson May 29 

Aloe S. Teuscher May 29. 

Mr. Merle Clark entered on duty as janitor at the Fishing Br useua 
I May 28. 

Park Naturalist Beal served as the Acting Chief Pa ram May 

9 to June 2. 



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fr mrpretive ferv^ces 

The script for the oricntational talk to bo used in the Canyon Visitor 
■tor was approved by the Superintendent and if in readiness ior submission to 
• Director *s office for the preparation of an automatic slide talk. 

The Interpretive Program for the 1958 season was worked up and 1200 copies 
■eographed. A copy of this program is attached. 

Park Naturalists Beal, Tyers and Condon rendered interpretive services 
i a number of special parties during the month of May. la all instances these 
■ups were taken on conducted trips out into the Park or around the loop. They 
re as follows: 



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ttHL 


Attendance 




rdiner llighschool 








Science Group. 


5/9/58 


32 people 


Co mOD 


•tana State College 








foreign studentaa 


5/14/53 


36 people 


.Jon 


lor ado State Univ. 








wildlife students. 


*/22/58 


32 people 


Condon 


cky it. College 








group. 


5/22/58 


60 people 


Tyers 


tee Forks High 








School. 


5/16/58 


32 people 


Baal 



The Interpretive nap section of the Master Plan tor Yellowstone Mationai 
rk was received from the Western Office of Design and Construction on lay 26 one 
isms recommended for approval by the superintendent on Jay 28. 

The amphitheaters at Mammoth, Canyon and West Thumb were made ready by 
III Naturalist Beal and aido on May 30. 

The orientational mapu for the Mammoth Hot springs tor race 3 were put up 
the 30th and those in the Lower Norris Geyser Basin Groan Dr. area 

May 29. 



The public address system was put into service at the 
* on May 19. 



thful Gey 



Interpretive services became available through seasonal personnel at Old 
.thful and Fishing Bridge an May 29 and were available at Mammoth throughout the 
tiro month of May. 

Activities and inhibits 

A number of specimens vera collected during May for use . Canyon Visiter 
r. Specimens, dates and the collector are as follows: 



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-:. 


.scat! en 
Insect Infestation 


.- -:L,- 


to 






area. 


3/3/58 


llpmunk 


Insect Infestation 






area. 


5/3/53 


if tern 






■toegaf 


Mfadison Junction 






Pft*flpgTQUnO , 


5/27/50 


. Ilantled 






ground squirrol 






In the Hoodoo's 


5/2/53 



Collector 

David de L. Condon 
David de L. Condon 

John A. Tyers 

John A. Tyers 



On the evening of May 5 Park naturalists Condonaand Beal left 
larters and took the grizzly hear family to the Jonas Dros. taxidermists in Denver, 
ilorado. litcy also delivered at that time the specimens of the Pike, Chipmunk, 
i the Golden Mantled ground squirrel. The bears vaare taken in a ..'rosea state 
4 were delivered in Denver at 10:00 a.m. on the 6th still in a frozen state. Beal 
I Condon returned to Yellowstone on the 7th. 

A California gull, an osprey, and two northern violet green swallows were 

►pod by John Ricks of the Liv jn, :iontana Quick Freeze locker Plant to Wards 

Kit i fie Supply House. These specimens arrived in Mew York in poor condition and 

ma possible for the Scientific Supply ; louse to salvage only the California gull 

the osprey. Additional specimens will be supplied to the taxiden^ i early 



A large rhyolite specimen was collected by Park Naturalist Deal and shipped 
I the Craters of the ^1oon ilational llonuaant on 'ley 21 lor use by them in the 
pdbits which they have in their Visitor Center. 

The moose exhibit case was brought into &Jaamoth on the I w refurbishing 

id a new structure to house it was built. The exhibit was returned and put up at 
• month's close. The Obsidian Cliff exhibit was repainted, a new plate glass put 
to replace the one broken last fall, avid It was available to the public at the 
hth's close. 

A large specimen of bright yellow rock was collected by 'ark Natura- 
Bt Condon from the canyon rim on iJay 25 and this was shipped to the eastern Museum 
boratory for use in the Canyon exhibits. 

Park Banger naturalist Stevens made some cho ,r the stagecoaches on 
I front porch of the lianaoth :5useum. The coaches were placed in the chocks 
i people could not move them around. 

The shutters on all field exhibits tjere removed by lay 17 and these exhibits 
Hi available for public use. 

lesrch and Observation 

Chief Park naturalist Condon made a field trip to the Lamar Valley on May 
ad at that time collected the pika and chipmunk for the Canyon Visitor Center 
libit s and also made seas pictures of moose, elk end trumpeter swan. On : lay 4 a 
p was made to the Calcite Springs area where specimens were collected for the 
on Visitor Center exhibits. A large number of pictures uere taken of thermal 



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Lturcs in the Calcite Springs area. Later la the day a trip was made to Canyon 
I Lake and an inspection made o£ the Clack Dragon's Caldron. This particular 
ituro, during the winter months, lias moved some 20 feet to the southwest and 
i created a very deep pit on that end of the crater. Two griaaly bear were 
tr the Black Dragon's Caldron and a good number of bull bison were observed at 
of points in Ilayden Valley. 



A large flock of starlings were seen in Hayden Valley and apparently, 
M species of bird is to become one that must be added to Yellowstone 'c check 
the trip from Mammoth to Slack Dragon's Caldron 9 different black bear were 
mrved along the road. 

A duck hawk was observed on the afternoon of Say 22 chasing magpie 
\ parade grounds at Mammoth. 

On May 25, on a field trip behind Bunsen Peak, oovies and stills ware 
le of trumpeter swan, sandhill crane, and elk. The trumpeter swan ore ties ting 
one of the small lakes behind Bunsen and the sandhill cr re nesting in the 
mhy areas boardering these lakes. 

Grouse were observed strutting in the area on the Canyon-Tower Fall 
d just below the switchbacks on Antelope Creek. Each year for several years now 
Richardson's grouse have used this area as a strutting ground. 

Two bull moose were observed feeding in Beach Spring Lagoon on* May 3. 
aaada goose wearing an orange n e c kband was observed at the same place. T. 
i day an immature bald eagle was seen attacking two Canada geese simultaneously 
point about l*s miles south of Chittenden Bridge on the Yellowstone River. The 
le departed when we stopped the car, but left one goose near death and unable 
novo and the other severely crippled. 

Five California gulls were observed on Swan Lake on the morning 

■B 

The Yellowstone national Park research library was used by several of 
Park employees and other interested during the month. The follow an 
on it of it use: 

Books- 

Magazines—— — — -21 

Pamphlets— — 9 

Books on indefinite loan—— —67 

Books check out — — -110 

. . Lucile B. Wagner was employed by the association as librarian 
1958 season and entered on duty May 19. 

frral History ftiinff fsjle^ 

Tho association has again employed Mrs. Lucile D. Wagner as librarian, 
arrived on May 17 and entered on duty May 19. Mrs. Bertha A. Wharton continued 
unction as clerk of the association and devoted her working time to keeping the 
s, assembling field orders for distribution to the stations and working 



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t the black and whito photo album. A lar^e stock of the publication Chemical 
•aturoc arrived from the printers on May 26. The sale; stock far the Old 
lithful Musoum was delivered to that field station on the 26th. Sales publications 
ire made available to the public at .'iasmottt on May 2, Old faithful oa May 29, and 
Lshing Bridge on May 30. 

mipment and Supplies 

The janitorial supplies for use for the Interpretive Division during 
be 1958 season were purchased at mid*mouth. 

Processing services were acquired for 20 rolls of lorn notion picture 
Lbs and 20 rolls of 35wa kodachrane film. 

A sectional oak book case, an office chair and an oak file cabinet were 
fttained as property for the Interpretive Division oa :&y 20. 

Two large metal insect storage cabinet*, were received on May 20. 
intact printer for use in the darkroom arrived and was added to the Division 
roperty on May 23. A water wier which is being used by George D. .Inrlor in his 
bermal area research studies was modified by the Park blacksmith on May 30. 

bjstographic and Visual Aids 

Park Naturalist Condon exposed 43 4x5 oegativ toy 4 and during the 
mth Park Naturalist Beal exposed 72 4x3 black and white negatives. These were 
I processed in the darkroom and contact prints made of them. During the month 
10 3x10 prints were made for the special Snow Survey Report; 10 3x10 prints were 
lis of grissly bear. In addition to these, 72 4x5 prints were made of the 
leder blade device for cleaning gutters and SO 4x5 contact prints were made 
mi Calcite Springs area. Seven 4x5 black and white photographs were made of the 
■■oth School classes before the close of school and these have been added to the 
kllowBtone Park pictorial files. 



David de h. Condon 
Chief Park Naturalist 



tachment 

py to: Condon 

Files 
Museum 
Reading Copy 
DCondon:svg 



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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



PROGRAM OF INTERPRETIVE SERVICES 
1958 Season 



May 7, 1958 



The program of interpretive services to be in effect for the 1958 sea- 
son in Yellowstone National Park is as follows: 

MAMMOTH 



MUSEUM HOURS 
INFORMATION DESK 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 






GUIDED WALKS 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk during 
the museum hours. He answers questions and sells 
literature on the National Parks. 

The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives museum 
talks whenever enough visitors who are interested in 
obtaining interpretive information are present to 
call them together. Museum talks are given each time 
bus parties arrive at the museum. When the work load 
will permit, two men should be in the museum during 
rush hours . 

NATURE WALK - Exploring the terraces and woodlands. 
Leaves the headquarters museum at 8:00 a.m. and 
Liberty Cap at 8:15 a.m. This walk follows the 
route of the Terrace Forest Trail from Liberty Cap 
to Narrow Gauge Terrace, thence to Clematis Gulch 
and down Clematis Gulch. The trip is completed by 
11:00 a.m. 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



TERRACE WALKS - To interpret and view thermal phen- 
omena. Morning trips 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. be- 
ginning from Liberty Cap. Afternoon trips at 1:00, 
2:00 and 3:00 p.m. These terrace walks are to be 
taken over the lower portion of the Mammoth Hot 
Spring Terraces and return to Liberty Cap. 

CLEMATIS GULCH SELF -GUIDING TRAIL - maintained by 
the Mammoth naturalist staff. It is a self-guiding 
trail which begins at the mouth of Clematis Gulch 
and continues up this gulch for about 1/2 mile, 
crosses the ridge to the vicinity of Narrow Gauge 
Terrace and returns to Liberty Cap via the Old 

(1) 









AUTO CARAVANS 



Norris Road. There will be no guided trips on 
this trail, but it is well signed with interpretive 
labels for the use of all Park visitors who care 
to travel the trail at their leisure. 

TERRACE CARAVAN - Begins at the headquarters museum 
at 2:00 p.m. Goes over the upper terraces 
visiting Main Terrace, Prospect Terrace, Soda 
Spring, and terminates at Angel Terrace. 

WILDLIFE SEARCH CARAVAN - begins at the headquarters 
museum at 6:30 p.m. and returns to the campfire 
circule at 8:00 p.m. Visitors drive their own cars. 
Moose, antelope, deer and other animal life may be 
seen on this trip. The road follows the main high- 
way from Mammoth to Willow Park or over other road 
sections if it becomes desirable to use them in order 
to seek wildlife. The time of this activity may 
be advanced to an earlier hour in the evening in the 
late season. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Each evening a program is held in the Mammoth out- 
door amphitheater at 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a 
short campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 



NORRIS GEYSER BASIN 



MUSEUM HOURS 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



There is a man on duty at the information desk dur- 
ing museum hours. He answers questions and provides 
other interpretive services. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



Short museum talks are given to groups of people who 
assemble at the museum and to bus parties at the time 
of their arrival there. 



GUIDED WALKS 



There are geyser walks conducted by park ranger 
naturalists over the main geyser basin loop trail 
in the morning and afternoon upon the arrival of 
bus tour parties. Additional trips will be made 
whenever there are large enough groups of motorists 
or special parties which have assembled and who are 
interested in such guide services. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
CIRCLE 



An evening campfire circle group will meet in the 
Norris Campground for an informal campfire talk on 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of each week. 
8:00 p.m. 

(2) 



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fc£LE«J2UIDIW# -WIAIL 



GREEN DRA GON SP RING SELF-GUIDI NG TRAIL - a well- 
labeled self -guiding geyser and nature trail. It 
is maintained by the park ranger naturalist at 
Norris. This trail has two routes that can be 
followed - a short trip of one mile, or the entire 
southern Norris Geyser basin loop of 1 3/4 miles. 

MADISON JUNCTION 



MUSEUM HOURS 
GUIDED TRIPS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

Special hikes will be organized and conducted from 
this station as work time available permits. 

A park ranger naturalist is on duty at the inform- 
ation desk during open hours to answer questions 
and sell publications. 

The park ranger naturalist on duty gives short 
museum talks on the history of the Park, the Park 
Service and the development of the National Park 
System to bus parties, special groups and whenever 
there are enough visitors assembled to provide an 
audience. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



There is an informal camp fire program at the camp- 
fire circle each evening from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. 



OLD FAITHFUL 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He answers questions and 
sells literature on the National Parks. 



GUIDED WALKS 



NATURE WALK - exploring Geyser Hill and the forest 
trail to Observation Point. The trip begins at 
Old Faithful Cone, leaves at 8:00 a.m. and returns 
to Old Faithful Geyser Cone at 11:00 a.m. 

GEYSER HILL WALKS - exploring Geyser Hill. Route 
of travel is over Geyser Hill, down to Lion Group 
and return to Old Faithful. Trips after each 
eruption of Old Faithful Geyser from 8:00 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. 



NOTICE: All walks begin from Old Faithful Geyser 
cone and announcements of these walks will be made 
in the Old Faithful Museum by the naturalist at 

(3) 



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the information desk. The naturalist conducting 
them will announce them at the Old Faithful cone 
talk. 



GEYSER TALKS 



GEYSER OBSERVATIONS 



CONE TALKS - The naturalist conducting the walk 
from Old Faithful cone will present short 10-15 
minute talks preceding each daylight eruption of 
this geyser. 

Park ranger naturalists stationed at Old Faithful 
will be expected to make geyser observations daily 
and post major geyser eruption times in the Old 
Faithful Museum and on the announcement boards at 
the geyser. As part of this geyser basin duty, 
field talks will be given at every opportunity by 
park ranger naturalists to the assembled crowds 
at the eruptions of major geysers. 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



GENTIAN SELF -GUI DING NATURE TRAIL - begins at the 
Firehole River Bridge crossing and parallels Geyser 
Hill for a distance of 1/2 mile, coming out near 
Beach Spring. Travel can be either direction on 
this trail. Labeling of this trail is done by the 
naturalist staff at Old Faithful 



EVENING TALKS PROGRAM 



CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - Held in the Old Faithful amphi- 
theater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a short 
campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 

OLD FAITHFUL LODGE TALK - Each evening except on 
Sundays there will be an illustrated talk given 
in the Old Faithful Lodge Recreation Hall from 
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 



ILLUMINATED ERUPTION 
OF OLD FAITHFUL 



The first eruption of Old Faithful occurring after 
9:00 p.m. will be illuminated. Prior to the illum- 
inated eruption a short geyser talk will be given 
by a park ranger naturalists. 



GUIDED WALKS 



WEST THUMB 

GEYSER BASIN WALKS - regular guided trips are made 
through the West Thumb Geyser basin at the time of 
the arrival of the scheduled tours. Walks will be 
conducted by the park ranger naturalist on duty 
whenever he can assemble a party. 



GEYSER BASIN INFORMATION 
AND PROTECTION PATROL 



There is a park ranger naturalist on duty in the 
geyser basin from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. He will 
conduct the geyser basin walks and the balance of 
the time he will be on information duty and basin 
patrol. 



(4) 



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SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



OVER-HANGING GEYSER SELF-GUIDING NATURE TRAIL - 
begins at the King Geyser and travels along the 
forest paths, up the lake shore to geyser and 
return. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Held in the West Thumb amphitheater from 8:00 
to 9:00 p.m. This will be a short campfire 
talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures . 



FISHING BRIDGE 



MUSEUM HOURS 



8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed 8:00 p.m. to 
9:00 p.m. Open 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He will answer questions 
and sell literature on the National Parks. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives 
museum talks whenever enough visitor who are 
interested in obtaining interpretive informa- 
tion are present to call them together. Museum 
talks are given each time bus parties arrive at 
the museum. 



GUIDED WALKS 



THERMAL OBSERVATIONS 



NATURE WALK - begins at the Fishing Bridge Museum, 
explores the lake shore area and explores the 
swamp near Fishing Bridge. The walk begins at 
8:30 a.m. and should return to the museum by 
11:30 a.m. On the trip people should learn the 
biology of the lake area, geology of the lake 
area and should have an opportunity to see plant 
life forms and an interesting array of animals. 

NATURE WALK AT LAKE - starts at the Lake Lodge 
at 9:00 a.m. and returns by 11:00 a.m. The route 
to be followed is the old Elephant Back trail. 

Park ranger naturalists at Fishing Bridge will 
patrol the Mud Volcano area and render informa- 
tion service. 



EVENING TALKS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - held in the Fishing 
Bridge amphitheater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It 
is a short campfire talk illustrated with 
colored slides or motion pictures. 

LAKE LODGE TALK - held in the Lake Lodge recrea- 
tion Hall from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. except on Sundays 
It is a short talk illustrated with colored 
slides or motion pictures. 

(5) 






CANYON 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the Visitor Center 
information desk during the open hours. He 
will answer questions, operate the automatic 
orientational program and sell literature on 
the National Parks. 



ALL DAY HIKE AND 

CARAVAN 
(Monday -We dnes day - 
Friday) 

UNCLE TOM'S TRAIL TRIP 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE AT 
OBSERVATION POINTS 



EVENING TALKS 



MT. WASHBURN HIKE - Will begin as a caravan 
at the Canyon Visitor Center at 8:15 a.m. on 
3 days each week, returning to Canyon Village 
by 3:15 p.m. 

CANYON HIKE - This is the adventurous ana 
thrilling hike down Uncle Tom's Trail to the 
canyon bottom at the base of the Lower Falls. 
These walks start at the South Rim Upper Fall 
Overlook at 8:30 a.m. and return by 11:00 a.m. 
- again at 2:00 p.m. and returning about 4:30 
p .m. 

Seasonal park ranger naturalists are to be 
stationed at Canyon observation point when- 
ever possible. These men provide interpre- 
tation, information and help to Park visitors. 
They present short talks which interpret the 
Canyon's scenic grandeur and geology to any 
and all groups that can be assembled. In 
addition, they serve the protective function 
of looking after the public's safety. 

CANYON EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM : - This program 
will be conducted in the Canyon amphitheater 
from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It is a short campfire 
talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures . 

HOTEL TALK - 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. each evening. 

TOWER FALL 



GUIDED WALKS 



Nature walks exploring Lost Creek is a natura- 
list guided nature trail hike which leaves the 
lodge at Camp Roosevelt daily at 8:45 a.m. and 
returns by 11:15 a.m. This is one of the out- 
standing trails in the Park for flowers, birds, 
mammals and scenic landscapes. When there are 
no hiking parties the naturalist will provide 
information service at the Observation Point at 
Tower Fall. 



(6) 



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INTERPRETIVE SERVICE AT 
OBSERVATION POINT 



The park ranger naturalist stationed at 
Tower Fall serves the Park visitors at the 
Tower Fall observation platform from 1:30 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. He meets the people and 
provides them with an interpretation of the 
landscape and information on Yellowstone. 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL The Lost Falls self-guiding nature trail 

winds up Lost Creek to Lost Falls. The 
nature labels along this trail will be main- 
tained by the park ranger naturalist stationed 
at Tower Fall. 

EVENING PROGRAM Each evening in the lobby of Camp Roosevelt 

Lodge at 8:15 p.m. there will be a short 
talk, illustrated with colored slides or 
motion pictures. 

The scheduled interpretive activities for any station are not to 
be changed until the proposed changes have been reviewed and approved 
by the Chief Park Naturalist. The program as outlined here should be 
adequate to meet the interpretive needs of the public during the 1957 
season. If this program can be improved by changes in scheduled activi- 
ties, or by the addition of activities, your suggestions will he welcomed 
by the Chief Park Naturalist's office. 



REFER TO THIS SCHEDULE WHEN YOU ARE IN DOUBT AS TO THE TIME AND 
TYPE OF ACTIVITIES THAT ARE BEING CONDUCTED AT THE VARIOUS INTERPRETIVE 
STATIONS THROUGHOUT THE PARK? 



7 



Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 

MONTHLY REPORT OF TUB INTERPRETIVE DIVISION 
JUNE - 1958 

Special Activities and Conferences 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended the dedication cere- 
monies at the new Visitor's Center at the Dinosaur National Monunent 
on June 1* Mr. Condon participated in the ceremonies, and also made 
noving as well as still pictures o£ the proceedings. He returned to 
Yellowstone on the evening of June 2. 

Park Naturalist Condon attended a meeting held with the con- 
cessioners in the Superintendent's office on June 5; at which tine the 
recreational program for employees in the Park was discussed at some 
length. On June 11, Hr* Condon attended the regular squad meeting. 

During the month, visiting officials from the Washington 
office were Hr. Kenneth Dale, who was in on the 9th and the 11th; 
Mr. Gunner Pager land, who was in on the 13th, and who was shown the 
new Visitor's Center at Canyon. 

The textual matter for interpretive signs, which are to he 
used at the five range-study enclosures, were reviewed by Park Natur- 
alist Condon after having been prepared by Biologist Kittams. 

Park Naturalist Condon completed a special assignment on 
the evening of June 15. He visited Crater of the Moon National Monu- 
ment on the 14th and 15th, and at that time made pictures for use by 
the Director's office in Washington. 

On June 20, Park Naturalist Condon accompanied LeRoy Wohl- 
brandt, and at that time they staked out the route for a trail to 
Wraith Falls on Lupine Creek. 

On June 21, Miss Shirley Ann Vm Gilder, who has been a 
clerk stenographer in the Chief Park Naturalist's office for the past 
two years, was married to Hr. Dundee Little* The ceremony was per- 
formed in the Methodist Church in Livingston, Montana. 

Hr. Warren S. Garst, a free-lance photographer, has been 
in the Park throughout thfc month of June. He stopped in at the Mu- 
semm and Park Naturalist's office on a number of occasions, and was 
given assistance in some of the work he was doing by members of the 
Interpretive staff. 



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On the evening of June 24, a meeting was held with Dr. 
Ralph McCinnis, head of the speech department of Montana University, 
and with Dr. Castle, Acting President of the University, to discuss 
the Pageant, which will be directed by Bert Hanson, and will beheld 
in Yellowstone on August 25. Superintendent Lemuel A. Garrison and 
Chief Ranger Otto Brown were also in attendance. 

On the sfternoon of the 26th of June, a young Belgian be* 
case stranded on the walls of the Canyon - just above Inspiration 
Point. Park Rangers Howe and Budge, with their Aids, effected a res* 
cue, and Park Naturalist Condon and Park Naturalist Replogle Bade a 
number of black and white and colored pictures of this taork v*en it 
was in progress. 

Religious Services and Chapel Use 

The printed schedule for the Religious Services program 
for Yellowstone was completed and distributed to field areas for 
posting. A special circular on the Religious Services program was 
released to all field personnel, and to the registration and lnf emo- 
tion desks at all concession establishments. 



The Roman Catholic services commenced June 15, and are be- 
ing conducted under the direction of Reverend Francis D. penny of 
Cody, 'Wyoming. The priests conducting the services are Father Uicien 
Senecal and Father Gerard Senecal. 

The Latter Day Saints services commenced June 15, and are 
being under the direction of the Saint Anthony Idaho State Mission 
of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 

The Protestant services are being conducted by a Chris- 
tian ministry in Yellowstone, which is sponsored by the National 
Council of Churches of the U.S.A. Reverend Jack A. Jennings is the 
resident minister for Mammoth and Gardiner, and is the Director of 
this program. There are a large number of Protestant services held 
each Sunday; a program and other church work is handled by tills 
group during the week. Reverend Warren tt. Ost, Director of the Chris* 
tian Mlilifttry in the National Parks, arrived in the Park June 13, and 
participated in the services on the 15th. Mr. Ost conferred with the 
chairman of Superintendent's Church Committee on the 16th, and, at 
that time, the Christian Mlnlstery program was reviewed; some helpful 
suggestions were received from Mr. Ost, and in turn he was given some 
help with his work. 

In-Service Training 

On June 9, Park Naturalist Condon conducted an la-Service 



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Training meeting for the bus drivers of the Yellowstone Park Company. 
This seating was held in the Canteen Building, with some forty-three 
bus drivers in attendance, and about eighty other employees and in- 
terested persons. 

The regular In-Service Training program for the seasonal 
Park Ranger Naturalists and the seasonal Park Rangers, was held June 
16 through the 19th. There were sixty trainees participating in the 
program, and Park Naturalist Condon and Park Naturalist Beai conduct- 
ed much o£ the training. A copy of the program used in presnetlng Ma- 
terials to the trainees la attached to this report. Those participa- 
ting from the Interpretive Division were as follows: 

Thomas B. Morledge Gilbert MaGee 

Joseph R. Murphy Sylvan Wall 

Paul D. Sebesta William T. Driscoll 

Richard C. Townsend Herrold Asmussen 

Donald Greer Lowell G. Biddulph 

Alan Sliosoa Wayne F. Replogle 

William Geroeraed Robert J. Jonas 

William Lewis Donald E. Chipman 
John Earl Ingmanson • Museum Curator 

Park Naturalist Condon presented an In-Service Training 
program for the employees of the Yellowstone Park Company, and other 
concessioners at Maaaoth on the evening of June 27. This was held in 
the Recreational Hall, and some two-hundred and fifty person were in 
attendance. Many of these proved to be Park visitors. 

Pork Ranger Naturalist Stevens assisted with the T.n-Ser- 
vlce Training Program at Camp Roosevelt on June 20, and Park Natural- 
ist Replogle and Ranger Naturalist, Herriman conducted an In-Service 
Training Program for employees of the Canyon Village on T une 23. 

A series o£ informational and directional memoranda were 
issued to Pork Ranger Naturalists during the month for their training. 

Personnel 

Museum Curator J. Earl Ingmanson was on duty all month. 
Park Laturaiist Condon was on duty all month. Park Naturalist Baal 
was on duty all month. Park Naturalist John A. Tyers left Yellow- 
stone for Mount Rainier National Park on June 2; having terminated 
his service at the close of business May 31. Clerk stenographer Shir- 
ley Ann Van Gilder was on duty all month except for one-half day sick 
leave ju^ J, Ml sixteen mtMSl ■HNS UMN IdMt on ISM '.Jth an<l MM&< 






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An attempt was made to obtain the services of Mr. Louie 
Xirk as Park Naturalist to succeed John Tyers, but Mr. Kirk declin- 
ed the position. Mr. Stanford Young and Mr. Howard Chapman were than 
contacted, but at month's and these men had declined, and ma are search- 
log elseiAere for a successor to Mr. Tyers. On June 6, Mrs. Agnes Han- 
son was contacted with respect to the GS-5 Secretary (Stenography) pos- 
ition in the Chief Park Naturalist's office, and as the month progress- 
ed, arraa$ement» were made for her transfer from the Fi3h and Wildlife 
Service to the National Park Service In Yellowstone, and it is antic- 
ipated that she will enter on duty shortly after July 1. 

Miss Margaret 51 lea Robinson was employed as a clerk typist 
to work on the thermal area research project. Miss Robinson entered 
en duty June 13, and remained on the job through June 30 . She then 
transferred to the Lake Ranger Station, there she is employed by the 
Protection Division. 

The services of Miss Shirley Ann Van Gilder were termin- 
ated at the close of business June 30; following more than two years 
of service as a clerk stenographer in the Chief Park Naturalist's of- 
fice. 



As previously stated. Miss Van Gilder was married on June 
21, and it is anticipated that her nervices will be used on a KAE ba- 
sis to assist with the work in the Museum. 



Ju::: . 



The entire seasonal staff was employed by the close of 
The seasonal personnel entered on duty as follows: 



Lowell G. Biddulph 
Herbert T. Lystrup 
Samuel M. Beel 
William J. Lewis 
Eugene C. Devenport 
Uam A. Fischer 
rill lam T. Driacoll 
William L. Baker 
George W. Hahn 
Wayne F. Rep 1 ogle 
Robert J. Jonas 
Walter f, Herriman 
Wm. Revell Phillips 
Elmer Anderson 
Burton Anderson 
Alan Eliaaon 
Thomas S. Morleege 
Lawrence Waymire 



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June 
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June 
June 
June 
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J\me 10 
June 10 
June 10 
June 10 
June 10 
June 10 
June 12 
June 14 
June 8 



Richard C. Townsend June 16 

Donald E. Chipman June 16 

Paul D. Sebesta June 16 

Kerr old Asians sen June 16 

Gilbert MaGee June 16 

Sytaen H. foail June 16 

Donald Greer June 16 

Tod Heckamen June 16 

Clarence C. Aliemen June 16 

William L. Germeraad June 16 

Richard K. Schroeder June 16 

Donald W. Larson June IS 

Joseph F. Catmull June 17 

Simon Simon ian June 17 

Donald C. Stewart June 18 

Frank D. Rentchler June 23 

Martin F. Miller June 24 

William Walsh June 6 






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Mr. Merle Clerk, William Welsh, end Lawrence Waymire have 
served as janitors et the Museums during the month. 

Mr. Samuel M. Beel was employed three weeks as a Park Ran- 
ger naturalist, and then furloughed on June 21, so that he could con- 
duct historical research for Idaho State College; who have contracted 
with the National Park Service to complete e study oi the Big Hole 
Battlefield National Monument and the Hea Perce Indian War. 

The Interpretive Division, for the first time la years, 
has been plagued with an epidemic of illness and accidents. Park Na- 
turalist Herbert Lystrun bruised hi* ribs on June 10; ars. .'iaybelle 
Parkinson, wife of Park Naturalist Ted Parkinson, suffered a leg in- 
jury vhe n she ran into a water weir which had been left la the door- 
yard at the apartment house; "rs. Thad Stevens suf fared bruises and 
abrasions when the floor of a shower stall collapsed; and Park Ranger 
Naturalist Richard M. Sehroedar contacted the mump* on June 21. 

Interpretive Services 

Park Naturalist Condon gave a special talk to seventy- two 
people at the Canyon Lodge on the evening of June IX . These people 
represented communities near the Park who were here mi a Good Will 
Tour. A special talk was given by Mr. Condon in the Canteen Building 
on the eveniag of June 16, and about one-hundred and one persons par- 
ticipated in the program. On the evening of June 24, . - -ondon pre- 
sented a talk to the summer school group at Montana University I 
Missoula. There were one-hundred and sixty people in attendance. 

There was a limited interpretive program - consisting of 
guided trips, evening talks, and information services available to 
Park visitors from the first of June until June 22. On June 22 the 
entire planned interpretive program for the Park went into effect, 
and has been in full operation since that date. A copy of the inter- 
pretive program, as being conducted by the Interpretive Division tor 
the 1958 season, is attached to this report. 

On the evening of June 20, Park Ranger tfaturalist William 
Driscoll of !*est Thumb presented a special program to the Cody Elk's 
Club group at Levis Lake. Mr. Driscoll gave the group a talk and 
then showed them "Your Yellowstone." 

Museum Activities ana exhibits 

Museum Curator J. Earl Ingmanson spent the month taking in- 
ventory of the Museum's accessioned items, and has prepared a lot of 
material for the records. He has visited the Norris, Madison Junction, 
Old Faithful, and Wishing Bridge Museums, and he is making highly sat- 









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It factory progress toward bringing all of the Museum records up to 
date. 

A special report on the Museum accessions, and other re- 
cords, was submitted to the Director's office on June 6. 



The moose exhibit structure in Willow Park was rebuilt, 
and the exhibit case completely refurbished. This exhibit was plac- 
ed in public use on June 6. The exhibit materials from Obsidian 
Cliff exhibit, which were damaged and stolen in the fall of 1957, 
were fully repaired, and this exhibit was also placed on public dis- 
play on June 6. 

On June 8, a special trip was made to the Seven-Mile Hole 
for the purpose of obtaining specimens and pictures for use In con- 
nection with the exhibits which will be placed on display in the Vis- 
itor Center. A large number of pictures were obtained, and ten speci- 
mens collected from the Seven-Mile Hole area. 

A number of Interpretive signs were installed on June 26 
at appropriate sites near parking areas on the road between Lake and 
Canyon. These new signs have been receiving use from the Park vis- 
itors, and a number of favorable comments have been received concern- 
ing them. 

On June 27, a long-distance telephone conversation was 
held with Mr. Salph Lewis, Chief of the Museum Branch in Washington, 
D. C, and at that time a number of problems associated with the Mu- 
seum exhibits were solved. An agreement was reached with respect to 
the exhibit content of some of the displays, which it appears neces- 
sary to alter. 

On June 21, a northern Violet Green Swallow and a western 
Tsnsger were shipped to the Ward's Scientific Supply in Buffalo, N.Y. 

The Mammoth, Old Faithful, and Fishing Bridge Museums were 
open to public use throughout the entire month of June, and the Mor- 
ris Museum opened June 16; the Madison Museum opened June 18. 

Three shipments of exhibit specimens, photographs, and 
ptherjjmajerjals w|re sent to the Eastern Museum Laboratory, Washing - 

The last of these left Yellowstone June 30, and completed 
all materials Yellowstone \m been requested to supply for the Canyon 
Visitor's Center exhibits. 












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Research aad Observation 



Park Naturalist George 0. Marler spent the entire month 
of June In the Gey3er Basins along the Firehole River, continuing 
his research studies of the thermal activity in that area. Hiss Mar- 
garet S, Robinson was employed to work with Mr. Marler on the ther- 
mal area research, and typed a great deal of the field notes and o- 
ther data, which had been prepared by him. Dr. Krling E. Dorf, with 
his party of Aids from Princeton University, arrived on June 27, and 
will continue their study of the fossil flora of the Park. 

During the month of June, collecting permits were issued 
to the following: 



Wallace J. Henries sy - 
Gail B. Denton 
D. A. Greenwood 
Dr. Jessop B. Low 
Terrence J. Cox 
Webster B. Todd, Jr. - 
Dr. Br ling Dorf 
David L. Marshall 
Nicholas It. Davis 
Richard A. Scott 
Thomas G. Rust 



Yellowstone Science Expedition - June 9 

Montana State College - June 11 

Utah State University - June 13 

Utah State University - June 19 

University of Arizona - June 20 

Princeton University - June 25 

Princeton University - June 25 

Princeton University - June 25 

Princeton University - June 27 

. . Geological Survey - June 26 

Trinity University - June 30 



On June 10 one of nature *s dramas was presented to a very 
large audience. A doe deer gave birth to twin fawns in the large de- 
pression across from the Hamilton Store at Mammoth. The setting was 
unusual in that it provided ample space for spectators to view the 
incident without interfering with the animal in any way. T^trge num- 
bers of people crowded around the rim of the depression and witnessed 
the birth of these twin fawns, aa well as the incidents associated 
with the fir3fc actions after being born. The first was born at about 
9:00 a.m. and the second one was born about 9:40 a.m. Both fawns were 
up and moving about within fifteen minutes after birth, and one of 
their first actions was to seek out their mother's udder and to nurse. 
The lighting vas^e* 08 * 1 ** 11 ** an< * practically everyone who had earners made 
pictures. Some good colored motion pictures and kodaslidec were obtain- 
ed for the Yellowstone National Park Collection. At 6:15 p.m. the doe 
deer led the two fawns up out of the depressed area and hid them under 
the rabbit brush near the rim. The fate of the two fawns since that date 
is not known. 





















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The Black Dragon's Caldron, throughout the month of June, 
proved to be an attraction of major importance, and during the past 
year it has moved some forty feet to the southwest - along the crack 
or fissure where the thermal energy is being released. The foot path 
to this feature is being improved, and some interpretive signs and 
maps are being made, and should be installed in July. 



The Wyoming Fish and Game Department banded several hun- 
dred Canada geese early in the morning on June 27 at Turbid Lake. 
Park Naturalist Condon had planned to participate in this banding, 
and to obtain pictures of it, but other obligations prevented his par- 
ticipation. 

On June 23, Park Naturalist Condon and Park Ranger Joseph 
Murphy visited the Canyon Hotel and collected a number of insects, 
which are thought to be bedbugs, and which apparently find the Cliff 
Swallow a suitable host • therefore are abundant in the nests of this 
bird. In addition to collecting the insect specimens, a Swallow nest 
was collected, end a representative group of the insects were sent to 
Dr. P. V. Oman, Insect Identification Branch, U.S. National Museum, 
Washington, D. C, 

Ou the evening of June 19, the trainees on the seasonal 
ranger force training trip were taken into the Trout Creek Dump, and 
at that time twenty eight grizzly bear were observed. On June 28, 
Park Naturalist Condon spent the evening at the Trout Creek Dump and 
observed fifty three gris&ly bear, and seventeen of those were cubs 
of the 1958 year. On the evening of the 29th, Mr. Warren Garst and 
Park Naturalist Condon spent the evening at the Trout Creek Dump, and 
o bs erv ed sixty throe grizzly bear, with only fifteen 1953 cubs being 
obs erve d. One of these cubs mas evidently an orphan, and was not 
claimed by any of the adults. 

Prairie Falcons are nesting on the ledge immediately be- 
low the overlook from which Oeprey Falls and Sheepeater Canyon can be 
viewed; another pair are nesting on the pinnacle Just south of Cleo- 
patra's Needle - near Overhanging Cliff. 

.kisrary 

The Yellowstone Park Research Library has bees used exten- 

ti&ti ierW^itfatfan^^ &?W 

voted much of her time to the card indexing of the old files and re- 
cords of the Army Administration of Yellowstone. 






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Field Libraries vera seat to Canyon, Fishing Bridge, 
West Thumb, and Old Faithful. Smaller selections of books were 
sent to Madison, Norris, and Tower Fall. The Yellowstone Library 
and :4useum Association purchased a number of books cor the library, 
and the records indicate the following use: 

Books on loan to stations for month of June* 94 
Books purchased for month of June • 29 
Pamphlets entered for month of June - 52 
Books loaned for personal use - June - 59 
Pamphlets loaned for month of June - 17 

Nature History Association 

The Yellowstone: Library and Museum Association sold pub- 
lications at the information desks at Madison, Old. faithful, Fish- 
ing Bridge, and Mammoth. No publications had been placed on sale 
at the West Yellowstone Information Station at the month's close. 
The Association employed Mrs. Lucille Wagner as librarian, and Mrs* 
Bertha Wharton as Association book clerk. From the 16th of June to 
the close of the month, Mr. John Teisberg was employed as photogra- 
phic technician, and he has accomplished a great amount of work in 
the dark room. The Association purchased, during the month of June, 
an Exakta 35mm camera with accessories at a cost of $227.00, and a 
portable public address unit at a cost of $64.95. They also pur- 
chased a nev driver unit for one of the large speakers at Old Faith- 
ful Geyser Gone. Two four-hundred foot reels of colored motion pic- 
tures taken of the 1955 eruption of Monaloa in the Hawaiian Islands. 

Equipment and Supplies 

The Division purchased a supply of photographic film 
from the storehouse stock for use during the 1958 season. They also 
acquired a large supply of materials for use by the janitors in keep- 
ing the Museums clean. We received the following equipment: 



1 Olympla typewriter, standard 1 Eureka vacuum cleaner 
1 16x16 foot projection screen 2 fireplace screens 
1 Holland Strobonar flash unit 1 Revere 388 projector 
1 Exakta camera, model VX Ha 1 Quick-Set tripod 
1 Bell and Hovell #302 - 16mm motion picture projector 

We have on order, but have not yet received one 400me tel< 
e photo lens; one 17x18 foot tarpaulin; two 15x16 foot tarpaulin; six 
large photo albums • about 500 filler sheets; and one 14 cubic foot 












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Photographlc and Vitutl Aids 



Park Naturalist Condon exposed seventeen 4x5 ektachrome, 
fifteen 5x7 block end white, thirty-* tx 4x5 block end white, throe 
rolls of K-135 colored film, «nd two-hundred foot of Item colored 
film of Crater of the Moon National Monument. Those films were pro- 
cessed, and prints made of the black and white pictures. All of this 
manorial was sent to Mr. Cullianane in the Director's Office at Wash* 
ington, D.C. During the month Mr. Condon exposed nine-hundred foot 
of 16ma colored motion picture film for the Interpretive Division col- 
lection, and four rolls of X-135 film. 

John Tolsberg was hired by the Yellowstone Library and Mu- 
seum Association to do darkroom work, starting June 16, and has done 
extensive work connected with the preparation of materials for the 
Canyon Visitor Center exhibits. Ha has also made contact prints of all 
the new negatives to be added to our collections. Total darkroom work 
accomplished this month would be approximately as follows: 

Films Developed 

12 4x5 filmpaeks 144 negatives 

50 4x5 cut film 50 negatives 

50 5x7 cut film 50 negatives 

5 120 roll film 50 negatives 

TOTAL 294 negatives 

Printing 



1,000 4x5 and 5x7 contact prints 

80 8x10 glossy or bleedout enlargements 

An intensive effort was made to complete the photographic 
work for all the Canyon Visitor Center exhibits, and by the month's 
end all the materials for this had been obtained and forwarded to the 
Museum Laboratory in Washington, D.C. This represents quite an accom- 
plishment when considered in the light of all the other duties the 
staff of the Division had to perform during this same period. 

Kodaslide sets and duplicate movies were issued to field 
stations early in the month and are bervlng satisfactorily, though 
seme of the movies are now very brittle and break quite easily. Some 
of our duplicate movies have nearly reached the end of their useful life. 

Respectfully submitted, 



file , David do L. Condon 

Chief Park Naturalist 




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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



PROGRAM OF INTERPRETIVE SERVICES 
1958 Season 



May 7, 1958 



The program of interpretive services to be in effect for the 1958 sea- 
son in Yellowstone National Park is as follows: 

MAMMOTH 



MUSEUM HOURS 
INFORMATION DESK 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk during 
the museum hours. He answers questions and sells 
literature on the National Parks. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives museum 
talks whenever enough visitors who are interested in 
obtaining interpretive information are present to 
call them together. Museum talks are given each time 
bus parties arrive at the museum. When the work load 
will permit, two men should be in the museum during 
rush hours . 



GUIDED WALKS 



SELF -GUIDING TRAIL 



NATURE WALK - Exploring the terraces and woodlands. 
Leaves the headquarters museum at 8:00 a.m. and 
Liberty Cap at 8:15 a.m. This walk follows the 
route of the Terrace Forest Trail from Liberty Cap 
to Narrow Gauge Terrace, thence to Clematis Gulch 
and down Clematis Gulch. The trip is completed by 
11:00 a.m. 

TERRACE WALKS - To interpret and view thermal phen- 
omena. Morning trips 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. be- 
ginning from Liberty Cap. Afternoon trips at 1:00, 
2:00 and 3:00 p.m. These terrace walks are to be 
taken over the lower portion of the Mammoth Hot 
Spring Terraces and return to Liberty Cap. 

CLEMATIS GULCH SELF-GUIDING TRAIL - maintained by 
the Mammoth naturalist staff. It is a self-guiding 
trail which begins at the mouth of Clematis Gulch 
and continues up this gulch for about 1/2 mile, 
crosses the ridge to the vicinity of Narrow Gauge 
Terrace and returns to Liberty Cap via the Old 

(1) 



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AUTO CARAVANS 



Norris Road. There will be no guided trips on 
this trail, but it is well signed with interpretive 
labels for the use of all Park visitors who care 
to travel the trail at their leisure. 

TERRACE CARAVAN - Begins at the headquarters museum 
at 2:00 p.m. Goes over the upper terraces 
visiting Main Terrace, Prospect Terrace, Soda 
Spring, and terminates at Angel Terrace. 

WILDLIFE SEARCH CARAVAN - begins at the headquarters 
museum at 6:30 p.m. and returns to the campfire 
circule at 8:00 p.m. Visitors drive their own cars. 
Moose, antelope, deer and other animal life may be 
seen on this trip. The road follows the main high- 
way from Mammoth to Willow Park or over other road 
sections if it becomes desirable to use them in order 
to seek wildlife. The time of this activity may 
be advanced to an earlier hour in the evening in the 
late season. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Each evening a program is held in the Mammoth out- 
door amphitheater at 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a 
short campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 



NORRIS GEYSER BASIN 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk dur- 
ing museum hours. He answers questions and provides 
other interpretive services. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



Short museum talks are given to groups of people who 
assemble at the museum and to bus parties at the time 
of their arrival there. 



GUIDED WALKS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
CIRCLE 



There are geyser walks conducted by park ranger 
naturalists over the main geyser basin loop trail 
in the morning and afternoon upon the arrival of 
bus tour parties. Additional trips will be made 
whenever there are large enough groups of motorists 
or special parties which have assembled and who are 
interested in such guide services. 

An evening campfire circle group will meet in the 
Norris Campground for an informal campfire talk on 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of each week. 
8:00 p.m. 



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SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



GREEN DRAGON SPRING SELF -GUI DING TRAIL - a well- 
labeled self -guiding geyser and nature trail. It 
is maintained by the park ranger naturalist at 
Norris. This trail has two routes that can be 
followed - a short trip of one mile, or the entire 
southern Norris Geyser basin loop of 1 3/4 miles. 

MADISON JUNCTION 



MUSEUM HOURS 
GUIDED TRIPS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

Special hikes will be organized and conducted from 
this station as work time available permits. 

A park ranger naturalist is on duty at the inform- 
ation desk during open hours to answer questions 
and sell publications. 

The park ranger naturalist on duty gives short 
museum talks on the history of the Park, the Park 
Service and the development of the National Park 
System to bus parties, special groups and whenever 
there are enough visitors assembled to provide an 
audience. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



There is an informal camp fire program at the camp- 
fire circle each evening from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

OLD FAITHFUL 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He answers questions and 
sells literature on the National Parks. 



GUIDED WALKS 



NATURE WALK - exploring Geyser Hill and the forest 
trail to Observation Point. The trip begins at 
Old Faithful Cone, leaves at 8:00 a.m. and returns 
to Old Faithful Geyser Cone at 11:00 a.m. 

GEYSER HILL WALKS - exploring Geyser Hill. Route 
of travel is over Geyser Hill, down to Lion Group 
and return to Old Faithful. Trips after each 
eruption of Old Faithful Geyser from 8:00 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. 

NOTICE: All walks begin from Old Faithful Geyser 
cone and announcements of these walks will be made 
in the Old Faithful Museum by the naturalist at 



(3) 



I 



( 















• -, . '. '•-*- ■ 



} 



1 



the information desk. The naturalist conducting 
them will announce them at the Old Faithful cone 
talk. 



GEYSER TALKS 



GEYSER OBSERVATIONS 



CONE TALKS - The naturalist conducting the walk 
from Old Faithful cone will present short 10-15 
minute talks preceding each daylight eruption of 
this geyser. 

Park ranger naturalists stationed at Old Faithful 
will be expected to make geyser observations daily 
and post major geyser eruption times in the Old 
Faithful Museum and on the announcement boards at 
the geyser. As part of this geyser basin duty, 
field talks will be given at every opportunity by 
park ranger naturalists to the assembled crowds 
at the eruptions of major geysers. 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



GENTIAN SELF -GUIDING NATURE TRAIL - begins at the 
Firehole River Bridge crossing and parallels Geyser 
Hill for a distance of 1/2 mile, coming out near 
Beach Spring. Travel can be either direction on 
this trail. Labeling of this trail is done by the 
naturalist staff at Old Faithful 



EVENING (CALKS PROGRAM 



CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - Held in the Old Faithful amphi- 
theater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a short 
campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 



ILLUMINATED ERUPTION 
OF OLD FAITHFUL 



OLD FAITHFUL LODGE TALK - Each evening except on 
Sundays there will be an illustrated talk given 
in the Old Faithful Lodge Recreation Hall from 
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 

The first eruption of Old Faithful occurring after 
9:00 p.m. will be illuminated. Prior to the illum- 
inated eruption a short geyser talk will be given 
by a park ranger naturalists. 



WEST THUMB 



GUIDED WALKS 



GEYSER BASIN INFORMATION 
AND PROTECTION PATROL 



GEYSER BASIN WALKS - regular guided trips are made 
through the West Thumb Geyser basin at the time of 
the arrival of the scheduled tours. Walks will be 
conducted by the park ranger naturalist on duty 
whenever he can assemble a party. 

There is a park ranger naturalist on duty in the 
geyser basin from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. He will 
conduct the geyser basin walks and the balance of 
the time he will be on information duty and basin 
patrol. 



(4) 



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) 



! 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



OVER-HANGING GEYSER SELF-GUIDING NATURE TRAIL - 
begins at the King Geyser and travels along the 
forest paths, up the lake shore to geyser and 
return. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Held in the West Thumb amphitheater from 8:00 
to 9:00 p.m. This will be a short campfire 
talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures . 



FISHING BRIDGE 



MUSEUM HOURS 



8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed 8:00 p.m. to 
9:00 p.m. Open 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He will answer questions 
and sell literature on the National Parks. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives 
museum talks whenever enough visitor who are 
interested in obtaining interpretive informa- 
tion are present to call them together. Museum 
talks are given each time bus parties arrive at 
the museum. 



GUIDED WALKS 



NATURE WALK - begins at the Fishing Bridge Museum, 
explores the lake shore area and explores the 
swamp near Fishing Bridge. The walk begins at 
8:30 a.m. and should return to the museum by 
11:30 a.m. On the trip people should learn the 
biology of the lake area, geology of the lake 
area and should have an opportunity to see plant 
life forms and an interesting array of animals. 

NATURE WALK AT LAKE - starts at the Lake Lodge 
at 9:00 a.m. and returns by 11:00 a.m. The route 
to be followed is the old Elephant Back trail. 



THERMAL OBSERVATIONS 



Park ranger naturalists at Fishing Bridge will 
patrol the Mud Volcano area and render informa- 
tion service. 



EVENING TALKS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - held in the Fishing 
Bridge amphitheater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It 
is a short campfire talk illustrated with 
colored slides or motion pictures. 

LAKE LODGE TALK - held in the Lake Lodge recrea- 
tion Hall from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. except on Sundays 
It is a short talk illustrated with colored 
slides or motion pictures. 

(5) 



( 



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) 



I 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



ALL DAY HIKE AND 

CARAVAN 
(Monday -We cine s day ■ 
Friday) 



CANYON 

8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the Visitor Center 
information desk during the open hours. He 
will answer questions, operate the automatic 
orientational program and sell literature on 
the National Parks. 

MT. WASHBURN HIKE - Will begin as a caravan 
at the Canyon Visitor Center at 8:15 a.m. on 
3 days each week, returning to Canyon Village 
by 3:15 p.m. 



UNCLE TOM'S TRAIL TRIP CANYON HIKE - This is the adventurous ana 

thrilling hike down Uncle Tom's Trail to the 
canyon bottom at the base of the Lower Falls. 
These walks start at the South Rim Upper Fall 
Overlook at 8:30 a.m. and return by 11:00 a.m. 
- again at 2:00 p.m. and returning about 4:30 
p.m. 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE AT 
OBSERVATION POINTS 



EVENING TALKS 



Seasonal park ranger naturalists are to be 
stationed at Canyon observation point when- 
ever possible. These men provide interpre- 
tation, information and help to Park visitors. 
They present short talks which interpret the 
Canyon's scenic grandeur and geology to any 
and all groups that can be assembled. In 
addition, they serve the protective function 
of looking after the public's safety. 

CANYON EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM : - This program 
will be conducted in the Canyon amphitheater 
from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It is a short camp fire 
talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures . 

HOTEL TALK - 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. each evening. 

TOWER FALL 



GUIDED WALKS 



Nature walks exploring Lost Creek is a natura- 
list guided nature trail hike which leaves the 
lodge at Camp Roosevelt daily at 8:45 a.m. and 
returns by 11:15 a.m. This is one of the out- 
standing trails in the Park for flowers, birds, 
mammals and scenic landscapes. When there are 
no hiking parties the naturalist will provide 
information service at the Observation Point at 
Tower Fall. 



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> 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE AT 
OBSERVATION POINT 



The park ranger naturalist statimied at 
Tower Fall serves the Park visitors at the 
Tower Fall observation platform from 1:30 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. He meets the people and 
provides them with an interpretation of the 
landscape and information on Yellowstone. 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



The Lost Falls self-guiding nature trail 
winds up Lost Creek to Lost Falls. The 
nature labels along this trail will be main- 
tained by the park ranger naturalist stationed 
at Tower Fall. 



EVENING PROGRAM 



Each evening in the lobby of Camp Roosevelt 
Lodge at 8:15 p.m. there will be a short 
talk, illustrated with colored slides or 
motion pictures. 



The scheduled interpretive activities for any station are not to 
be changed until the proposed changes have been reviewed and approved 
by the Chief Park Naturalist. The program as outlined here should be 
adequate to meet the interpretive needs of the public during the 1957 
season. If this program can be improved by changes in scheduled activi- 
ties, ©r by the addition of activities, ymxr suggestions will be welcomed 
by the Chief Park Naturalist's office. 

REFER TO THIS SCHEDULE WHEN YOU ARE IN DOUBT AS TO THE TIME AND 
TYPE OF ACTIVITIES THAT ARE BEING CONDUCTED AT THE VARIOUS INTERPRETIVE 
STATIONS THROUGHOUT THE PARK'! 



) 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



PROGRAM OF INTERPRETIVE SERVICES 
1958 Season 



May 7, 1958 



The program of interpretive services to be in effect for the 1958 sea- 
son in Yellowstone National Park is as follows: 



MUSEUM HOURS 
INFORMATION DESK 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



GUIDED WALKS 



SELF -GUIDING TRAIL 



MAMMOTH 

8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk during 
the museum hours. He answers questions and sells 
literature on the National Parks. 

The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives museum 
talks whenever enough visitors who are interested in 
obtaining interpretive information are present to 
call them together. Museum talks are given each time 
bus parties arrive at the museum. When the work load 
will permit, two men should be in the museum during 
rush hours . 

NATURE WALK - Exploring the terraces and woodlands. 
Leaves the headquarters museum at 8:00 a.m. and 
Liberty Cap at 8:15 a.m. This walk follows the 
route of the Terrace Forest Trail from Liberty Cap 
to Narrow Gauge Terrace, thence to Clematis Gulch 
and down Clematis Gulch. The trip is completed by 
11:00 a.m. 

TERRACE WALKS - To interpret and view thermal phen- 
omena. Morning trips 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. be- 
ginning from Liberty Cap. Afternoon trips at 1:00, 
2:00 and 3:00 p.m. These terrace walks are to be 
taken over the lower portion of the Mammoth Hot 
Spring Terraces and return to Liberty Cap. 

CLEMATIS GULCH SELF-GUIDING TRAIL - maintained by 
the Mammoth naturalist staff. It is a self-guiding 
trail which begins at the mouth of Clematis Gulch 
and continues up this gulch for about 1/2 mile, 
crosses the ridge to the vicinity of Narrow Gauge 
Terrace and returns to Liberty Cap via the Old 

(1) 






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AUTO CARAVANS 



Norris Road. There will be no guided trips on 
this trail, but it is well signed with interpretive 
labels for the use of all Park visitors who care 
to travel the trail at their leisure. 

TERRACE CARAVAN - Begins at the headquarters museum 
at 2:00 p.m. Goes over the upper terraces 
visiting Main Terrace, Prospect Terrace, Soda 
Spring, and terminates at Angel Terrace. 

WILDLIFE SEARCH CARAVAN - begins at the headquarters 
museum at 6:30 p.m. and returns to the campfire 
circule at 8:00 p.m. Visitors drive their own cars. 
Moose, antelope, deer and other animal life may be 
seen on this trip. The road follows the main high- 
way from Mammoth to Willow Park or over other road 
sections if it becomes desirable to use them in order 
to seek wildlife. The time of this activity may 
be advanced to an earlier hour in the evening in the 
late season. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Each evening a program is held in the Mammoth out- 
door amphitheater at 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a 
short campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 



NORRIS GEYSER BASIN 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk dur- 
ing museum hours. He answers questions and provides 
other interpretive services. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



Short museum talks are given to groups of people who 
assemble at the museum and to bus parties at the time 
of their arrival there. 



GUIDED WALKS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
CIRCLE 



There are geyser walks conducted by park ranger 
naturalists over the main geyser basin loop trail 
in the morning and afternoon upon the arrival of 
bus tour parties. Additional trips will be made 
whenever there are large enough groups of motorists 
or special parties which have assembled and who are 
interested in such guide services. 

An evening campfire circle group will meet in the 
Norris Campground for an informal campfire talk on 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of each week. 
8:00 p.m. 



(2) 



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1 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



GREEN DRAGON SPRING SELF-GUIDING TRAIL - a well- 
labeled self-guiding geyser and nature trail. It 
is maintained by the park ranger naturalist at 
Norris. This trail has two routes that can be 
followed - a short trip of one mile, or the entire 
southern Norris Geyser basin loop of 1 3/4 miles. 

MADISON JUNCTION 



MUSEUM HOURS 
GUIDED TRIPS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

Special hikes will be organized and conducted from 
this station as work time available permits. 

A park ranger naturalist is on duty at the inform- 
ation desk during open hours to answer questions 
and sell publications. 

The park ranger naturalist on duty gives short 
museum talks on the history of the Park, the Park 
Service and the development of the National Park 
System to bus parties, special groups and whenever 
there are enough visitors assembled to provide an 
audience. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



There is an informal camp fire program at the camp- 
fire circle each evening from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

OLD FAITHFUL 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He answers questions and 
sells literature on the National Parks. 



GUIDED WALKS 



NATURE WALK - exploring Geyser Hill and the forest 
trail to Observation Point. The trip begins at 
Old Faithful Cone, leaves at 8:00 a.m. and returns 
to Old Faithful Geyser Cone at 11:00 a.m. 

GEYSER HILL WALKS - exploring Geyser Hill. Route 
of travel is over Geyser Hill, down to Lion Group 
and return to Old Faithful. Trips after each 
eruption of Old Faithful Geyser from 8:00 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. 

NOTICE: All walks begin from Old Faithful Geyser 
cone and announcements of these walks will be made 
in the Old Faithful Museum by the naturalist at 



(3) 



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( 



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) 



) 



GEYSER TALKS 



GEYSER OBSERVATIONS 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



the information desk. The naturalist conducting 
them will announce them at the Old Faithful cone 
talk . 

CONE TALKS - The naturalist conducting the walk 
from Old Faithful cone will present short 10-15 
minute talks preceding each daylight eruption of 
this geyser. 

Park ranger naturalists stationed at Old Faithful 
will be expected to make geyser observations daily 
and post major geyser eruption times in the Old 
Faithful Museum and on the announcement boards at 
the geyser. As part of this geyser basin duty, 
field talks will be given at every opportunity by 
park ranger naturalists to the assembled crowds 
at the eruptions of major geysers. 

GENTIAN SELF -GUI DING NATURE TRAIL - begins at the 
Firehole River Bridge crossing and parallels Geyser 
Hill for a distance of 1/2 mile, coming out near 
Beach Spring. Travel can be either direction on 
this trail. Labeling of this trail is done by the 
naturalist staff at Old Faithful 



EVENING TALKS PROGRAM 



ILLUMINATED ERUPTION 
OF OLD FAITHFUL 



CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - Held in the Old Faithful amphi- 
theater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. This is a short 
campfire talk illustrated with colored slides 
or motion pictures. 

OLD FAITHFUL LODGE TALK - Each evening except on 
Sundays there will be an illustrated talk given 
in the Old Faithful Lodge Recreation Hall from 
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 

The first eruption of Old Faithful occurring after 
9:00 p.m. will be illuminated. Prior to the illum- 
inated eruption a short geyser talk will be given 
by a park ranger naturalists. 



WEST THUMB 



GUIDED WALKS 



GEYSER BASIN INFORMATION 
AND PROTECTION PATROL 



GEYSER BASIN WALKS - regular guided trips are made 
through the West Thumb Geyser basin at the time of 
the arrival of the scheduled tours. Walks will be 
conducted by the park ranger naturalist on duty 
whenever he can assemble a party. 

There is a park ranger naturalist on duty in the 
geyser basin from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. He will 
conduct the geyser basin x^alks and the balance of 
the time he will be on information duty and basin 
patrol. 



(4) 



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» 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



OVER-HANGING GEYSER SELF -GUIDING NATURE TRAIL - 
begins at the King Geyser and travels along the 
forest paths, up the lake shore to geyser and 
return. 



EVENING CAMPFIRE 
PROGRAM 



Held in the West Thumb amphitheater from 8:00 
to 9:00 p.m. This will be a short campfire 
talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures . 



FISHING BRIDGE 



MUSEUM HOURS 



INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed 8:00 p.m. to 
9:00 p.m. Open 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the information desk 
during museum hours. He will answer questions 
and sell literature on the National Parks. 



MUSEUM INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICE 



The park ranger naturalist on desk duty gives 
museum talks whenever enough visitor who are 
interested in obtaining interpretive informa- 
tion are present to call them together. Museum 
talks are given each time bus parties arrive at 
the museum. 



GUIDED WALKS 



NATURE WALK - begins at the Fishing Bridge Museum, 
explores the lake shore area and explores the 
swamp near Fishing Bridge. The walk begins at 
8:30 a.m. and should return to the museum by 
11:30 a.m. On the trip people should learn the 
biology of the lake area, geology of the lake 
area and should have an opportunity to see plant 
life forms and an interesting array of animals. 

NATURE WALK AT LAKE - starts at the Lake Lodge 
at 9:00 a.m. and returns by 11:00 a.m. The route 
to be followed is the old Elephant Back trail. 



THERMAL OBSERVATIONS 



Park ranger naturalists at Fishing Bridge will 
patrol the Mud Volcano area and render informa- 
tion service. 



EVENING TALKS 



EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM - held in the Fishing 
Bridge amphitheater from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It 
is a short campfire talk illustrated with 
colored slides or motion pictures. 



LAKE LODGE TALK - held in the Lake Lodge recrea- 
tion Hall from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. except on Sundays 
It is a short talk illustrated with colored 
slides or motion pictures. 

(5) 



) 



) 



CANYON 



MUSEUM HOURS 

INFORMATION DESK 
SERVICE 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

There is a man on duty at the Visitor Center 
information desk during the open hours. He 
will answer questions, operate the automatic 
orientational program and sell literature on 
the National Parks. 



ALL DAY HIKE AND 

CARAVAN 
(Monday-Wednesday- 
Friday) 

UNCLE TOM'S TRAIL TRIP 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE AT 
OBSERVATION POINTS 



EVENING TALKS 



MT. WASHBURN HIKE - Will begin as a caravan 
at the Canyon Visitor Center at 8:15 a.m. on 
3 days each week, returning to Canyon Village 
by 3:15 p.m. 

CANYON HIKE - This is the adventurous ana 
thrilling hike down Uncle Tom's Trail to the 
canyon bottom at the base of the Lower Falls. 
These walks start at the South Rim Upper Fall 
Overlook at 8:30 a.m. and return by 11:00 a.m. 
- again at 2:00 p.m. and returning about 4:30 
p.m. 

Seasonal park ranger naturalists are to be 
stationed at Canyon observation point when- 
ever possible. These men provide interpre- 
tation, information and help to Park visitors. 
They present short talks which interpret the 
Canyon's scenic grandeur and geology to any 
and all groups that can be assembled. In 
addition, they serve the protective function 
of looking after the public's safety. 

CANYON EVENING CAMPFIRE PROGRAM : - This program 
will be conducted in the Canyon amphitheater 
from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. It is a short campfire 
talk illustrated with colored slides or motion 
pictures . 

HOTEL TALK - 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. each evening. 

TOWER FALL 



GUIDED WALKS 



Nature walks exploring Lost Creek is a natura- 
list guided nature trail hike which leaves the 
lodge at Camp Roosevelt daily at 8:45 a.m. and 
returns by 11:15 a.m. This is one of the out- 
standing trails in the Park for flowers, birds, 
mammals and scenic landscapes. When there are 
no hiking parties the naturalist will provide 
information service at the Observation Point at 
Tower Fall. 



(6) 



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I 



INTERPRETIVE SERVICE AT 
OBSERVATION POINT 



The park ranger naturalist statirmed at 
Tower Fall serves the Park visitors at the 
Tower Fall observation platform from 1:30 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. He meets the people and 
provides them with an interpretation of the 
landscape and information on Yellowstone. 



SELF-GUIDING TRAIL 



The Lost Falls self-guiding nature trail 
winds up Lost Creek to Lost Falls. The 
nature labels along this trail will be main- 
tained by the park ranger naturalist stationed 
at Tower Fall. 



EVENING PROGRAM 



Each evening in the lobby of Camp Roosevelt 
Lodge at 8:15 p.m. there will be a short 
talk, illustrated with colored slides or 
motion pictures. . 



The scheduled interpretive activities for any station are not to 
be changed until the proposed changes have been reviewed and approved 
by the Chief Park Naturalist. The program as outlined here should be 
adequate to meet the interpretive needs of the public during the 1957 
season. If this program can be improved by changes in scheduled activi- 
ties, or by the addition of activities, y*ur suggestions will be welcomed 
by the Chief Park Naturalist's office. 

REFER TO THIS SCHEDULE WHEN YOU ARE IN DOUBT AS TO THE TIME AND 
TYPE OF ACTIVITIES THAT ARE BEING CONDUCTED AT THE VARIOUS INTERPRETIVE 
STATIONS THROUGHOUT THE PARK'! 



( 



£61- 0<+ 

) 

Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 

July 1958 

MONTHLY REPORT OF THE INTERPRETIVE DIVISION 

Special Activities and Coafareuces 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a program meeting in 
the Superintendent's office on July 1. Mr. H. Raymond Gregg, Regional 
Chief of Interpretation was in Yellowstone on July 1, and left on July 
4. Mr. Gregg conferred with members of the Interpretive Staff, and 
attended Interpretive Programs. 

Mr. Warren Garst, Wildlife Photographer, was in on July 1, 
and again on July 19. Mr. Walter Berlat, another Wildlife Photograph- 
er, was in on July 19. Reverend Duane Murphy, the former student min- 
ister in charge of the christian ministry in Yellowstone, was in on 
July 7. Dr. Carling Malouf was in on July 14 for the purpose of dis- 
cussing the archeological research project being conducted by the Uni- 
versity of Montana. Mr. J. W. Thompson, a photographer who prepares 
educational films, was in on July 14. Mr. Thompson has obtained a 
large number of Yellowstone pictures, and makes these available to 
schools as film strips. 

Mr. Joseph C. Moore, former Park Biologist at Everglades 
National Park, and now with the American Museum of Natural History in 
New York, visited headquarters. 

Park Naturalist Baal met Audio-visual specialist Don Erskine 
of the Washington Office at Canyon on July 5, and they inspected the 
Canyon Amphitheater installation, which was considered excellent, and 
the auditorium of the new Visitor Center. The following deficiencies 
were noted in the Visitor Center Auditorium: 

1. No aisle lights 

2. No ventilator fan in the projection booth 

3. No control of stage lights from the projection booth 

4. Relay switch for house lights was extremely noi§£ 

5. A baffle system or drapca should be installed there 
at the entrance of the auditorium. 

Chief Park Naturalist attended the Squad Meeting on July 15, 
and participated in the conferences and field activities associated with 
the Director's visit here July 22 through the 25th. 






£61- 0<+ 



Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 

July 1958 

MONTHLY REPORT OF THE INTERPRETIVE DIVISION 

S pecial Activities and Conferences 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a program meeting in 
the Superintendent's office on July 1. Mr. H. Raymond Gregg, Regional 
Chief of Interpretation was in Yellowstone on July 1, aiid left on July 
4. Mr. Gregg conferred with members of the Interpretive Staff, and 
attended Interpretive Programs. 

Mr. Warren Garst, Wildlife Photographer, was in on July 1, 
and again on July 19. Mr. Walter Berlat, another Wildlife Photograph- 
er, was in on July 19. Reverend Duane Murphy, the former student min- 
ister in charge of the christian ministry in Yellowstone, was in on 
July 7. Dr. Carling Malouf was in on July 14 for the purpose of dis- 
cussing the archeological research project being conducted by the Uni- 
versity of Montana. Mr, J. W. Thompson, a photographer who prepares 
educational films, was in on July 14. Mr. Thompson has obtained a 
large number of Yellowstone pictures, and makes these available to 
schools as film strips. 

Mr. Joseph C. Moore, former Park Biologist at Everglades 
National Park, and now with the American Museum of Natural History in 
New York, visited headquarters. 

Park Naturalist Deal met Audio-visual specialist Bon Erskine 
of the Washington Office at Canyon on July 5, and they inspected the 
Canyon Amphitheater installation, which was considered excellent, and 
the auditorium of the new Visitor Center. The following deficiencies 
were noted in the Visitor Center Auditorium: 

1. No aisle lights 

2. No ventilator fan in the projection booth 

3. No control of stage lights from the projection booth 

4. Relay switch for house lights was extremely noig* 

5. A baffle system or drapaa should be installed there 
at the entrance of the auditorium. 

Chief Park Naturalist attended the Squad Meeting on July 15, 
and participated in the conferences and field activities associated with 
the Director's visit here July 22 through the 25th. 



♦ 






i 

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i 

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- 

- 
■- - 

- 

i 

- 

: 
- 

- 



-2- 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon picked up three Utahans 
positioned to go into the Trout Creek Dump on July 18. That sane even- 
ing he picked up a speeder on the Canyon Lake road. These violators 
ware turned over to the Canyon Ranger Station for disciplinary action. 

On July 21, Chief Park Naturalist Condon went to Madison 
Junction for the purpose of viewing on the ground proposals for changes 
which might be made there ii the Visitor Center station, and with res- 
pect to road alignment. In attendance at this field conference were 
Mr. San ford Hill, Chief of the Western Office of Design and Construction; 
Mr. Themes Vint, Chief of the Washington Office of Design and Construe* 
tion; Ted Virth, Landscape Architect; and Mr. Luis Gastellum, Assistant 
Superintendent. On July 29, Chief Park l*aturalist Condon prepared the 
operating program for the Interpretive Division, and based operations 
on available funds - $82,938. He also submitted, to the superintendent, 
a personal estimate for the expanded program under Mission 66. 

The Superintendent's Committee* established for arranging for 
a dedicatory service at the Canyon Visitor Center, met on Friday, July 
13, and set up a tentative program. Chief Park Naturalist Condon has 
been completing plans for the pageant, which has been set for August 
25 at 6:30 p.m. Memorandums and letters were sent out on the subject 
on July 29. 

Religious Services and Chapel Use 

The Yellowstone iSational Park chapel was used for the regularly 
scheduled services as set up for the religious service program for the 
1938 season. The Roman Catholics, the Latter Day Saints, and the Protes- 
tants held services as scheduled. 

On July 3, Chief Park Naturalist Condon, as chairman of the 
Superintendent's Church Committee, ordered two sets of altar hangings 
to be placed in the chapel as a memorial to He. William M, Nichols. These 
altar hangings will be - one ami green and one set purple. 

la - Service Training 

Park Naturalist Seal instructed Sari Ingmanson and Agaes Hanson 
on multilithiag, and also gave Agnes Hansen training in the operation of 
the mimeograph. Park Naturalism Condon and Seal audited camp fire pro- 
grams at the field stations, and conferred with the men who presented 
these programs regarding their presentations. 



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-3- 

rl lateral 1st Co 

ist Beal w . : cy all ao •■■:.. ; . - . ;rator 
j hity all Month; except Cor leave without 

i t tie, Clerk-;. t - . fcy bo 
reported July 3 t 
iy) in the 

;; hour - Lrley 

. i , .-■■- h the Interpretive 
July 31 . 

month with the ex*. > retur 

duty on July 3 I . been out 

wer. liant » * 

Splendid G 

wore .«:• they cos 

behind then. to . rely l 

area, au oiie tr rotect th aa. . are reeov *r 
.-•... rant that 

Interpret rvicei; 

r . age of conduct 

I nety two I 
uly 3. entered 

the tforth ;e at 7:00 p.n. 

. . Coado.i rendered i Lterprat 
i • . - rty on t 

July. Bo gnv Lk about the becutis 

Park : July 

| tweatj | hyaici 

the :0C p.m. 

fuly Mr. tveral hour 

*ir. ,a utate Read est) i 

.'..■■'- ry Chamber 

Pr 
n Mich 
2, and Par - outl: 

role that th confer 






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I ef Park Naturalise Z.j ... •• eolleetio 
re to Cue ft « • v ! .g. ota on July 17. Ur. 
Stehr had requested those spec- or tax :udy. Park , 
;ur teven made the collection. 

Chi 7uly . ion to ' 
Sverett Appel co the Trout Creek Dump to observe . . the 
beer. ir. Feasor was very later tg observat 

• the purpose oJ ob. ground data to be 
•. for the grizzly bear group at Canyon. 

a July 19, Chief Par] .on lo> group to 

Molly I jr the e of b. ten , gulls, a :aus. 
The members o. the party were allows: 

. y ■ :- s .Le Donald Ch .pxaan 

Mrs. Wayne Repio Karl Ingman 

lliam Dri utler 

■•:..-■ . rst Hrs. Walter 

11 Paul Sebe 

.lee El leu Uratlein 
Elliott D.- . 

Lliott Davis try An - 

Four-hundred and ninety* \ ore 

-ied - three Caspian tern - o - ty pelica 

led. Wildli -stographs were abta ie . 

July 19, Hr. Coido mmi t on the 

Rocky Island - several piece., on the .■•■-;•' md. While at the 
lands he ol>t rge i ■: artifacts, which have been ace 
j to the Yellowstone Sat cmal Park colie 

rds, several yc 
'■, e. ' erent pairs a to- 

gether by fish line which hnd become eaten] around their l.eet. 
young s \ hook in its breast, and it was dr. 

iner, >nd considerable line arc i th it. All of tb 
t the pel and gulls are capturi 1 
by . i nhermen. 



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t time Zor ins! y August 17. 

. 

ir. .. . rthur enter 

July 1 to work re arch ar 

osacut ' I .' tana. 

Arthur hav Park the eat 

have Bade a survey of oaterials collected, .ua Ac- 

ce Ltfli . itiay tcted a tuattx re 

to enrry tb tivity daring Dr. 

: MM 

:.iOU M ~ t ■■ 

J I, Pax ::::•..■.. 

a ci .'■■"-'. ■ ;■ ■ ■ ■ che 

north o~ the roei . lo-tnmdi 

. .cure trw I »ly gran 

> tad about tii.. by 

Jiaiaater. .Ir. Biddulph has written 

g the taoath of July t'. 
vara iseuc 

-■.'..: . Arthur 

Montana Si . rsity 

Eari I Ye 11 a. 

Jo - iurphy v • 

Gilbert yen 

. t ■ J 
. sr Id •. Soil 

red back c 

the . :<tel - it tamed 

(rally referred to a .It w 

ant, that they le 
that by so doing th 

Pi'. t :o the area o 

L3. On t made phot: 

1 juar o£ Du - 

. 





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July 













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- 

a-, i 

to the ■-■; > 

18, Mr. 

rout Cro 

. 

e ■ 

■ . 

j ■■ ■ • o 

ill 

Liott 

. 

throe I 

. 

' - ■ - v • • 

MC ■ "■''■■■ ■ \ 

■ ■ 

lectio 

. ■ . 

you breast, 

... 









• 






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- 

. . . 

ok Dubi . ii that 
Dump at *2. 

tnnpa 

Otter CvMd - ha« l rery 

. " . . July 28, eh 

re at th aouth reek. 

■ 
■-'••■ 

ry 

till out 
t 






uly 

-tiy 

• • ..,......■ 

■ • . 

.: pay 

■ 

' I ■ '- ■ ■ ■ " ■ 

■■■'•• uly V 

fay th 

Qa - . i fcure 

cowp. - t©uogr<spher Shirley 

L. Xha nailed 



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Equipiaent and Supplier 

Fireplace cover- vzere tu . zurad by the bl 
the ire li tributed to Canyon . sst Tuunb. 

Canyon ..• t r - t pen z> mel were supplied with materi . 
and supplier lor tits construction . ix lor lace and ~ro : 

screens on July 15. They erect i 16x16 foot screen in the Can- 
yon Amphitha z~^ t c\ad constructed fra for the tx-?o 14x1. . 
screens lor Maanoth and We C Thumb Amphitheatres. 

I TOWS 400 on telaphoto lens for Ex :_ : era cri s 

July 23. Tli »rdered .. : ... •- 1 year. 

Vi sual Aid 



ur-hundred loot of 16 mo Ansco colore ilm were 

exposed, and two rolls o ix ..re 35 . : i ... '.-.:' .. - 

packs were also expoi b roce ad. 

Re 3 pact fully submit t - , 



David de L. Con 

... . ; ck turalist 



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Yellows to oaal Perk 
Yell . ta Park, Wyoming 



September 11,1938 

Maiaerandum: 

To : Superintendent 

r ssu Chief Park naturalist 

Subject: o ...La >rt of the Interpretive Division - 
August 1938 

Special Activities and C onferences 

Chief Park Naturalist Condon attended a cenfere 
in the Superintendent's office . pet 1. The program to be 
followed in the management of the Gallatin, nerthei 
ern Yellov7stone elk herds were discussed. At the me t were 

;riatcadent Garrison, Assistant Superintendent Gastelluia, 
Chief Park Ranger Brown, Park. Biol is. As 

Park Ranger Sylvester, Park Ranger Edwards, and Chic P rl •.tu- 
ralist Condon. 

>: August 2, representatives e£ the ..lercury 3utbosr; 
c la.uifacturing Company '.era In the Park, . .le some 
colored pictures of their boat and iaotor in use en YellovJctone 
Lake. 

Chief Park Natural Jidon was the Activ dent 

'. 

j Committee far the dedication of the Canyc tor 
Center met on August 3, and again on August 11. Member, 
Cociaittee were Mr. Joseph Ja , far. Joseph Kurt£, Mr. Iheodora 
Wirth, Mr. Harold Edwards, and Mr. David Condon. 

The regular Superintendent's Staff Meet are 
attended by members of the Interpretive Division as Collo.rs: Aug- 
ust 7, Park Naturalist Seal; August 21, Chief Park Naturalist 
Condon. 

Museum Curator Newell Joyner ef the Region II of ice 
arrived in the Park on August 5, and worked with members ef the 
Yellov-to:e Staff until his departure on Auguct 17. 






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3n the 13th a special e ■ \snce was attended in 
SuptrH nttndtnt Carrie oa'o office by Chief Part Naturalist 
Zendea. 

>.i the 19th another special meeting was at I by 
Chief" Park Taturalist Condon, at which time the telapho . 
ice was discussed with representatives of the Telephone C ca p any . 

The booklet entitled, . rii in Yello. 
Obsidian' , by .ir. Jaiaes D. Levitt, was 
Ilaynes and Hamilton stores during t a areata. This publical i 

... dared to be a desirable ana as La at 
tion da 

iir. William C. tfuliar~, ?■ rk iaturalist froa 
', '..'■... J ....u.onal Iwmiaant plaits falls le ©a the 14th. 

. the evening o' A;_ v ,,. l 3, Cta i J - rk taturalist 
Condon apprehe^ued Mr. Douglas ' . DaVrlas, employee of the Yel- 
lows tana Park Company at Massseth. ir. DeVries was found guilty 
of rSJefclaas driving and finer . , 

ir. John Good, Principle Naturalist, Geology, 
the Director 5 '■..-». : , m, arrived 
the 23rd, and left on the Mch. Mr. as givers. 
attention as possible consist . rk lot. 
of his visit. 

During the month, the <'rogram for the 19! 

fiscal year was changed 3 times, alas during tfau loatl : 
estiva ta Cor the 1966 tted. 

•lr. Bdauad s. Rogers, Eerewr si »£ 

Yellowstone ml Park, . ... . ^ at the Chie '- rl fatural- 
ist Condon' ce for a vxsit 

rfc itaturalist Seal conferred i I Ir. Verdat Erdar, 
Turkish Forester, on August 2; with Mr, Paul I , Author 
for Redbook -iagaziae, on August 4; ami tb. r. L. Ban 

avi ■: •-•. a u' \i,j •...., ,:,.- ■, m Eh* S7til. br. .-<r Jv >t.u ■- pWH 

paring au article an ■ ■ AJve.itura li l anal Parks' , 

Mr. Bonney . ritiug a book on "Haunt . Ldama 

19th and 20th, a Life photographer and writer »«ire ia Yel ' 

j tone obtaining materials for use in a special edition of Life. 

It is planned that the article "Western National Parks' will be 

released next spring. 



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Religious Cervices 

The regularly scheduled services Cor all deruwaiuut 
continued through the month of August. A special Reman Catholic 
Service was held in the Yellowstone national Park Chapel ©n Aug- 
ust 15. 

The Reverend Jack Jennings directed the summer Protestant 
i,-stry Program, and on August 20 the Reverend Jay aaa ar- 
rived in the Park. Ax. HlillMM is the Assistant Director of the 
national Park's Ministry, and h lit to Yellowstone \ a - 
o.oc w. tu, and asSMMEVS, the operations or the rational Park's Min- 
istry in Yellowstone. 

Ob the afternoon of August IS, fete. Cole Ivsrson, 
Yellowstone Park Company employee i : the Canyon Hotel, ; 
Carole Klllttodw, coinraarcial .Airline Stewardess, N»ni unite* 
holy matrimony :.i Yellowstone yiational Park's Chapel by tl: 
or anti Jack Jennings. 

At the Protestant smrv ess, Sunday mer..i :':-, 

a special service was held, asdicatiag alter, lectern, i i ulpit 

hangings in memory ■ Lam . U: , onuer the 

v o-'.n«.. Natl Casjnsajr. These articles were givsm ay tfeo .-.'.•"> 
lows tone Park Company aaaalsysma . sxvies, as prase 

conducted by Reverenn Jas) Jo gs, i-.evoro.id Jay Wil) . . , i 
Chief Park Taturalist Coadou. 

-<aan Catholic services for the 1958 season terminated 
with the service held on August 30. 

- >yxyico Training 

In the afternoon s August 6, at ?•*•» • isrius of 
special training movies were nimaaffitsri ts the Bureau si Puol .« 
Roads employees in the new Canyon Visit sv Center Auditorium. . 
mare :fno.ra by Pegs naturalist Kayns ELsplegle. 

Dn the evening of Au] - : : Park Naturalist Con 
f.;vi c>i& program of the Park 1 .- LTaturaiiati 
-........- . . st 514 felts !ul, and discussed their s/orl ' a'. i .. 

A special trailing committee meat *a hole so .sgust 

26. In attendance were the committee members, Par neer Rove, 

Chief Park Ranger Brown, Uqu- v ,^ it upervisor Rsalnsau, Adtainia- 

trative Officer Anderson, Personnel :er Killer, and Chief Park 



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Naturalist Condon, chairman. A special report was prepared by 
Mr. Miller, the Park ' . ig Officer, on the conclusions e£ Che 
training committee, and this report was .;ubiaitted to 
II office. 

Park Naturalist Real devote*., considerable time dux 
the latter part of August with Park Naturalist Hewitt - givi . 
him orientation la Interpretive Div operations. itt 

attendee* as May >i the IntarpratiYt Pragma aativitias as was 
passible during the latter part of the Month. act j- 

ities he garnered a gaad idea of the Program a 

Personnel 

Chief Park Natural ..st Caodaa 
Park Naturalist Seal was on duty all month; itfuseum Curat 
mans an was on duty all month; and Secretary (Stenography) 
sou was on duty all month. Pari ftturalist He 
duty in Yellowstone National Park on August 17. Mr. 
comes to Yellowstone from Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 



Museum Curator Ingmanson made a special trip to 
Hole Battlefield National Monument where he worked with 
Curator Joyner. Mr. Ingm Left Yellowstone en A 
and returned on August 6. 



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During the month a number af persons were 
in applying for Park Ranger Naturalist amploysae.it, aa 
ences were held with Hiss Mary Augu i, r. 

Brigga an August 11, and Mr. Tan tfiiso) fcngnst 21. 3 
tian was given these people regarding the procedure t 
in applying far such employment. 

Park Ranger Naturalise Tauseher ~/as ill aa : 
early pari he month, 
August 1 and 12; Park Range raliat tank 6 hours 

At leave on August 11; Park Ranger Naturalist Harris 
8 hours sick leave on August 13; aid Park Ranger Naturalist 
Wall took 16 hours sick leave 15. 

Park Naturalists Raplogle and Ly strap left on Au 
1 or Glacier 1 Park to help in fire supp \?rk. 
My. y tfua returned the evening of August 20, and Mr. Raplogle 
list 



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Mr. Ted J. Park was promoted from Park Ranger 

iatur; .c petition F275 SB- ■■> Inch Sefcmrall E oaattlen t204 

GS-5, effective August 24. 

The Museum Janitors were placed on a 40-hour week, 
beginning August 30. 

. John Teisberg was employed as a WAE Park Ban 
do photographic work early In the month. 

In order to keep Interpretive personnel on the job at 
Field Stations as long as possible, Park Beturaliat Beal has been 
ig the clearance and checkout at P ■ ladquartare for many »f 
Bha MM. Pmrsoanel at Btmt mm anday r. Beal'i and Pork Natural- 
ist Llewitt's supervision were urloughoa as folio 



Alma B. Teuscher 



August 17 



Herbert T. Ly scrap 

; .:v. -. : . .y>,. .-: 

:.. ] .j I leal ami 
lanVau s. onBtrniw 

Salter P. Herriaan 

liam T. Bviae 
Donald u. Lerae i 



August 21 

August 21 

August 23 

August v.: 

August 24 

ust 25 

August 2:5 



: . . .-.■ 



August 27 



Wayne 7. Rap 1 ogle 
Robert J. Jonas 
Uerrold Asiaussen 
William A. Fischer 
George V. llahn 
Donald C. Stevart 



August 2S 
August 23 
Augus t 
August 2t> 
August 
Amajea t 



Sylvan H. ' ' 



August 






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Interpretive "ervices 

The Interpretive Program, as scheduled £or the 1958 
i,eaao*, m conducted in full until the latter part of August. 
A change made in the Prograu was the discontinuance of the 
evening Wildlife Caravan on the 26th. All other Interpretive 
Programs at llaumoth were aed as scheduled. Interpretive 
Services at both Jorris and lladisoa remained the same throughout 
the month. The Pfogram at Tower Fall-T.oosavelt Lo 
conclu the 29th. Signs and labels for the lost , 
guiding nature trail and Interpretive advertising signs were 
brought in on the same day. 

Park Naturalist Heal spent considerable tiiae 
up schedules for personnel to bring about ■ curts 
of Interpretive Cervices. A relatively full prog:: not- 

ed through Labor Day. All activities were operati ng at I. 
"Dritige, but the Lake Lodge walk and owning program were ited 
August 22 and 30 respectively. At Canyon, the all-day hike u 
1'ashburn was terminated after August 2 i the Unci.; Z 
trips after August 29. The Canyon 

ped on August 23. The sal - ■ tea is v . . >- 

mantled on August 2;;, vailo th. . Overhanging Geyser Trail 
was dismantled August 31. At G : ul Geyser observation 
Basin contacts were curtailed, starting August 22, roer to main- 
tain the full program of walks and to. w the ret the 
■onth . 

Chief Park Natural Seneau gave a special talk t< 
visitors in the Canyon Amphitheatre on the eve; ist 13. 

• attendance at this talk proved to be interna o 

the fact that people were asked to crowd sr en the Amphi- 
theatre seats. After all seat- Led, peo- 
ple were seated along the sic the Axaphi theatre, along the 
. -. ..> ■:. ii ■ . v.cLe.^i:-., • 1 into the wanes for vmm distance. 
Park Naturalist Replogle and Park Ranger Naturalists Devenport 
Phillips counted the people in attendance, and reported 1,312 per- 
sons on the seats - tlie total in attendance at the Program 
1,917 perso a . 

the evening of August 15, Chief t taliot 

Condon gave a special talk to the Geological Society of Americc. 
at Cooke City, t Ion tana. ere 166 Geo 
families, and a total attendance of 257 per 












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August 16 the screen was put up in the Canyon 
Visitor Center Auditor-ma by Chief Park ;aturalict Condon, and 
a special tall, mm give*n to 40 persons la 1 Auditorium that 
evening - using a new 16 am colored motion pt«e?«m entitled, 
'Yellows tone Seasons', which had been prepared by Mr. C 

On August 17, Chief Park Statural 1st Condon conducted 
a special party en ■ guided trip over Meant Wasttbu Tape re- 
cordings were mada of the elk bugling and coyote howling sounds 
Tor Mr. Arden Parke s. 

The annual Campfire Day Pageau ted at 

Madison Junction on August 25. Rehearsal.: ef the Pageant Cast 
were held on the afternoons of the 19th, 21st, 
rehearsal was held at en Junction on th<i ^'^.h, and the out- 
doer drama was presented on the 25 th at 5:30 p.m. Excellent 
operation was received frota the Cast as well as from all t 
Operating Divisions in Yellowstone with respect to arranging all 
esseutiais for a successful presentation. Mr. Hyde end th 
neeriiig Division are to be commended to arrangements made for 
seating. The Electrical Divisic array's gu 

did a fine job o itall • welic addr , the port- 
able power plant, and the LigBti ~fc the Ceapgreund. Leroy 
Uohlbrandt, Lee Martin and others did a fine je ; the 
livestock ready and evaila ir use. 

A total of 390 people were counted as being in 
attendance. The Pageant was very will received, and the r* 
tien was that the presentatie I 1950 was superior to that of 
1957. Mr. Bert Hansen directed die presentation and Mr. Eoyai 
Darnell assisted with the makeup of the Cast. Encilla nth- 
er prevailed, and it la Hltwijlf that this presaatati 
worth the effort expended. 

In an attempt to lap w w irpretiv 

the public, a questionnaire was submitted to all the seas- 
Park Naturalists and Park Ranger Naturalists attexi Eke 
Camp c ire Programs. From this questionnaire wa liopa to submit 
a report to the Region 11 office in September. 

Chief Park naturalist Condon prepared an article for 
inclusion in the Encyclopaedia Britanniaa, ;t to 

them right after the first of September. 



Park Naturalist Baal presented a special program to 
the L.D.S. Fireside group in West Yellowstone on August 6. Mr. 
Jack Rot ti ere, Photographer for the bureau of Land I4atu 
in Alaska, presented a special program at the Mammoth Ai i 
theatre on August 4. 

Iluseum Activities and E xhibits 

■ exhibit inatallatie ., cam 
iuseuu iipecialist Lafayette, Exhibit. ..-action Specialists 
Feasor and Phillips completed the installation of exhibits at 
the C- yon Visitor Center ou August t and the party la 
lows tone en Augu. t >. Vbt, "loyd Lafayette gt 
entrance a.. . Dan Feaaer and Fr 
Cra:: the north. 

One of the large plate glass sections of the 
\>o-v£ ix!ii.bit caaa hi irefcen, sod irmnfainnfff ..■v.-. a* i en 
August 5 with the Livingston 1. d Glass Company, .or the 
replacement of this glass. Qu August 12, Chief 2. .. 
Condon went to Livingston iA wrought back the glass, and it . 
installed on the 13th. 

On August 17, a special ram was held at L i 
Canyon Visitor Center, at which time this structure, and 
ated facilities, were dedicate.-,- ex Park visiter*! u .. I - 
Honorable 7red A. Seaton, Jecratary of the 3 the 

principle speaker. Conrad L. Wlrth, nal Pari Service 
tor, participated la the program. Sotao 600 to 700 people 
nessed the impressive ceremony, and participated in the 
day's use ai fchia Visitor Center. One of the intetfe&t 
of the dedication was the taiaiag ©. one of the al art Yal. 
stone Post lags at tl, awctt. The flag wa~ . ned 

on loan basis from Mr. Jac . . A copy of the prog-. 
leasad at this dedication La attached to this Report. 

Caaferaname ware held with ttaaaam Cure- « a£ 
the Regiea II eff.--ce, :luseum Curator Iagmanson, Park Haturs 
Baal and Chief Park iaturaii^t Condon on August l- 

ceroiug --Suseua materials. 



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The snail mammal specimens for installati >n in the 
Canyon Visitor Center were received on August 18, and installed 
in the exhibit cases at Canyon by Park Naturalists fieal a . 
Hewitt ovi the 20th. The Jonas Brothers found it impossible to 
prepare satisfactory specimens from the weasel and pikas which 
had been sent to then, so oil August 21 another weasel was sent 
to then. The weasel was collected by Park Ranger Naturalist 
Don Larson en August 25. Two more pikas were sent - the 
acted by Park Naturalist Baal. The grimly bear gr. 
not been received at the month's end, and although Jonas Brothers 
had indicated that they would make delivery by August 31. 

Research an d Observation 

On August 4 the Thermal Research Prograza bell j 
conducted by Park naturalist Llarlar, was discussu ice 

of Superintendent Garrison. This same Research Project was re- 
viewed by Sir. John H. Good, Biologist, Region II office, on Aug- 
ust 23. 

Dr. J. 1J. Lodewyks, Zoology Professor, rdam, 
Holland, and Mr. John Paul Jooc idlife Photographer, 
Iowa, were taken to the Trout Creek Dump. At that time, phote- 
graphs were made of grizzly bear. 

During the month of August, an unusual wil play 

was available to Park visitors. Although thousand 
too.- aaVanfcagi >: It, th—endi irevt fay rtt&umt beinj swan 
the rare opportunity available to them. Two pair of trumpeter 
swan have been frequent iug the Yellowstone River in the v • cies 
of the mouth of Aiwa Creek and Otter Creek. At Alum Creek a pair 
ware observed with two cygnets, and at Otter Creek a pair of non- 
nesting birds have bee i oh erved. The amazing thing about th 
swan is the fact that they show no evidence of being ti« 
have permitted large numbers of people to approach t. t 
feet of them for the purpose of observing and photographing them. 
Undoubtedly many beautiful pictures have been obtained of the 
birds, and we regret that in all instances where we have observed 
them, circumstances have been such that it was not convenient to 
stop and obtain pictures - as a result we do not have any. 



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IT. Bay vilcox, Geologist of the United Stat-. 
Geological Survey, was In Chief Park laturalist Condon's o - 

m on August 11 and 13. Dr. Wilcox is very much interested 
Ln volcanic geology, and a number of years ago he proper 
special paper on the mixed rock area aear Sheepeater CI 

Vhe.t presenting the talk to the Geolog : Cooke 
City, Chief Park Naturalist Condon hao a: o iity to visit 

c. P-.arce of the United States Geo Survey, Dr. 
Parsons of ' -ay ;e University, and Dr. Srling Dorf, Print 
University. These oeu arc all doing research \;ork related t 
tertiary velcenl :. the erthaast quarter of Yellowstone. 

3or-2 stopp:. Pari laturalist m'a office an August 
?.3, and at that tiiae discussed the research work whiel 
doing the last four year;.. Re left Yelloi 
and terminated his work for this year. 

Of unusual inter a the fact that Che evening of 

August 15, 16, 17, and 13, the large Rusi A ■ Lly 

visible as it passed over Yellowstone - between the hours 
and 9:00 p.m. 4any of the people in the Park observed the 
I of the satellite over 

Dr. I ,.:>ve, ad Dr. tfillian Cobban were in the 
Chief Park laturalist' A . t that time they 

were granted collecting pernil 

id some time checking on geological nor. 
Jurassic and Cretaceo aunt Everts. 

;ir. John H. Good, Gaol | t for dation&l Park Service, 
spent August 25 with Park daturalist tarlor in the Geyser 
and reviewed with hiia the Thermal Research ha la 

August 25 a conference cone \ fc i dsberies 

problems and Fishery Research i tllewstene was held in Super - 
tendent Garrison's office. At that time matters rel to in- 
terpretation of Fisheries - their isaaning - were discussed with 
1. Wallace from the Director's effiea. 

On August 26, Mr. John I. Davia I tad, ■ ... , 
in the office of Chief Park Naturalist Condon, and at that time 
discussed with him the DeLacy party Travels Through Yellowstone 
and related experiences whiah ataer had while serving as a 
member of that party. 



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-11- 
On August 29, several copied ef the paper entitled, 
"Social Behavior of the American Buffalo" by Tom HcHugh were 
; -:cc..vua. Copies o. these -/arc distri butee 1 to Libraries I i 
persons interested ia tue results ugh's studies. Copies 
-.Tore also placed ia the Yellowstone Park Research library. 

Dr. John Craighead •£ iontaua University 
August 29, and is very anxious to arrange details which will 
permit a cooperative study between the University 
national Park Service ©a the grizsly bear. Dr. Craighead ex- 
pects to raturi to Yellowstone about September 7 to fur 
discuss this mat tar. 

The Trout Creek Dump was visited by Clue 
Naturalist Cendovi fr. John Good, Biologist, 
office, on August 23. At that %iam —re t . grizzly 
bears were observed. Chi the ovoaing of August 15, Pari 
uralist Seal, National Park rapher voucher, and Dr. 
Craighead of lioataua Universe le observations at 
Trout Creek Dump. 

Mr. Phillip L. Johnson, i dtuatc student a 
Dr. Billings at Buke University, used the Yol 
arium to check some of hi 

alpine plants in the Beartootli oreo. Bo antici 
mere extensive work here as hi next - 

xaer. 

•s. William M. P» • Washington, D. C. 
.ted the Museum on AMflM , and used the Yollowstoi 
Research Library in pursuit! bar ,.tudy •£ :et lil • tr 

Library 

Yellowstone Park Research Library woo 
extensively by Park visiters and Park employees during the 
month of August. During this moaCb a number • orders were 
placed for additional books for the Library. Mrs. Lucile B. 
Wagner continued her services as Librarian. 

The Yellowstone Library and Museum Association 
records show the following: 

Books on lean to Station* in August 94 
Books purchased in August 

Pamphlets entered, August 17 

Books loaned for personal use 44 

Pamphlets loaned for August 52 






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-12- 

-.aral History Asseciat: 

The Yellowstone Library and luseum Association 
continued the sale of publications in Field station*. A i add- 
ed sales center was established at the Canyon Visitor Center en 
August 17, and publications have been available at tU 
tien desk since that date. We now have publications o ^a at 
Mammoth, Madison, Vest Yellowstone, Old Ltfaful, Fi dge 
and Canyon. 

Dn August 15 the Yeli. ia library and Hose 
iiion financed the preparation of 1,000 maps and 1,000 
programs for use at the Canyon Visitor Center Dedicatio program. 

The Yellowstone Library and Miusoum Assoc 
financed the costs of makeup for use at the annual Camp fire . , ? 
Pageant, and also met the expense- for "x . i;ert Haass 
loyal ':ar : rai.i. tax Log the:.- . a_".uu si staying aad traveling ta and 
from the Park. 

ra. Lucile Wagner is employed by the Association as 

Librarian and Mrs. Bertha Wharton as Book Clerk. 

Equipment and Suppl les 

A 14 cubic foot Colci Spot Ffoose Chest was obtain© 
August 21, and placed la the luMMB basement. Thic piece 
equipment will be used to hold mammal and bird sped. nick 
are killed by automobiles, yat arc . . condition for pres- 
ervation until such time ac Ma can prepare them for the Park 
Ltuuy Skin Collection. 

Three tarps for u • sra . cavairs Mare roc 
August 22, and these will be Inetal iy for use dv 

the 1959 season. 

Six large photo albu. ply of leaves were 

obtained. These are being aeod to expand the phot 
A large order of stationery a id office supplies were received in 
August, and these have been placed in storage for U3e. 

I moos' Lux aas Loat Hod Li feka aasstti Aapb theatre, 

and has boon put in use there. 



-13- 

Photographie a nd Visual Aid s 

S Park Ranger Teisberg and Park Naturalist Beal 
spent the day ef August 3 at Canyon getting picture^ 
sion 66 developiaeata. A set of dasiides, sho-. 
various phases of the Concessioner and Government activities 
was forwarded to the Washington office on August 25. WAE 
Park Ranger Teisberg exposed 60 4x5 black and white negatives 
en the trip. 

Mr. Jack Voucher, tal Park Service Photographer, 
arrived on August 12. "ir. Bcuehar 
ting oriented la the Park, . eccess to th 
provided with an Exacta Camera outfit to facilitate the 
of color si: dea oa Yellowstone'. Lea 6G work. 

August 30, Pari Euralist Beal clea - 
projection booth at Canyon Visitor Center, and or; the 

equipment to facilitate its il - . Lg iu-doov rams. 

al length lenses were supplied for both 
slide projector . 

Park Sanger Jaturalist fumer has worked in th* 
roam part time. He has taken manj Lctures and has produc< 
some very good results. ... Ranger Teisberg has been 
work on publicity picture c . lagement Assist a 

p rt-time basis, and has also t irk. 

Black and white negat are added to our col lac.: 
approximately &» fellows: 

Jack S. Boucher 150 

Robert E. Turner 60 

John S. Teisberg . . 

Merrill D. Deal 20 

MX lave been taken th 

have been printed up and catalogue - d> rintfi bei 
the albums - but those taken this month will require co 
work b a are up-to-dai: . 

Respectfully submitted, 



David de L. 

itura 



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Yel I 

October 3, 1 • 



[emerandue 

uperintendent 

ran: Chief ?nrk Naturalist 

Sub . : 

- «,ai Ac tiy.i.t:L<3^ 

lief Pari l r ■ . 
for tha ftacyclopaec ent out in th 

on September 3, 1 

>race 

troei ctoi the tio 
. ituraliat 



rlr. Guy D. 
"orxiir . 

. thro*, . 
making colored - motion plctui 

tha evening o . t a , . 
Int. 

h were 

1 
to arrive at tha fire. 

Ch - 
.September : amber 19, 19 

jepteaber 8 the Chief Par) t accompanied 
Landscape Architect Mkttson av far as the Chocolate Pote on 

rer ind return i r or the purpose of re Lble 

ta cleat 



A special mec ->r the 

\ devel- 
are- • tperintendent itembex 

. 

... 6 Ch the Distric ..ar for 
rict and - Architect 

. would be highly desirable to ©3 Le the 

Lde of: t . j i . 
held on September 9, . 3. 

Ch : if far! alist eerv« 

■ ." - 13 » 24, 2 

K>. 

che 17th of September 
Encyclopaedia was re ed and cosameiu; tl 

trtiele to Mr. tierbert ,'. 

"apt— l»r. - lettex 
Peking, China, a t *e Yel sture 

Motes ior a -.e library La 
publieatio as vera "- it the rned by the 

partner- ram Si La, 

to the u 

A representative of the al 

was in Yellowstone national Park on .amber 19." 

that date the television inatal uea 
trie .rray. . . : exatau. 

at lea- , there was nothing to worry about w re- 

spect to the installation 

On September 30, .amoraadua cover 

for the physical utilised by . . - 

terpre;. . w prepared aa to the 



The Vrotestant servicea were ha 
National Park chapel t ;hout the month with the Revei 
conducting the services. 

The regular church school iber 28, 

it will be held each . mom" ir the bale 
winter at 10:00 a.m. 

sees teat f cter Day ax rices were he! 

Canyon and Old thful thro amber 14, 









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cy Pro I ed tha 

...:■. r ' , 

regular winter .try Program, with 'end Jack J 

the resident minister, will . .th the first ■ i< ay in 

October 

, »ecial meeting o tuoMt 
ia the conference room in Che Ac 
eve 1 :-. September 25, . : -a the con 

the - 3 try in Yellowt Eational Park wt 

materially Cheng* 



The Revere.id Jack J 



titutioo to the latioaal Council 
arel a .. 



tor their co': , 






0;.; the apteia 

way presented to the member hie lorn 

the employees a'j, a tra^ irize 

employe.- I other' anal Pari 
Glacier I Park, Hawaiian Voice 
colored movie of the Geyser 



Chief Park Naturalist . duty all month 

for two hours i lei leav. ar 10, 

Jaturaliat Baal wee 

.uty all month. Park Hat -. t iarier duty i 
capt Cor two days • leave taken on the 
ber 19 S3. iry (Stenography) duty al 

Huaeum Curator 1 -igmam. e ared on a 
3:00 p.m. September 19, 1958. ir. 
taoni 

The jeaiio ial perso i^el were reduced to oily one men by 
the month's close. Term personnel w lows: 



Arthur 

Donald E. Chipmau 

iurphy 
Richard oder 

Thome or ledge 

Clai iaan 

... . il ' ;» : i:.:. ,. 



Robert mar 
uchler 



Furloughed 

. 
Furlou .;' 
Furl ou ghed 

; - - »■ •, .' - ■ 

Furloughed 
Furloughed 

Furloughed 

\ rloui. 

had 



iber 1 

September 1 

September 2 

September 4 
Sept I :./•.: ; : 

September 4 

September 1 
September 

iber 9 












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Greer 

■ j. 

MM 

.lerle A. Clark 

Gilbert R. iagoe 

Sugeue ort 
- .. • 
. re 
..had .ovens 
Will . 



Ten : 

,'aad 
Fur ' 
Pur 

. 

Fur' i 

ted 
> 
Ter:.i 



i sr 10 

amber 11 

September 11 

:mber 13 

ir 13 

. 

September 18 

er 18 

• 

September 25 

sr 23 

er 30 



ttiad . Sttvan oov :>ver Fall to Canyon 
member 2, 195 • 

tetabar , 1958 I tal conferred with 

igar Baton Greer at -bout t q 

icy of Greer 

were . g to terminate his service;.: as of September 

er than r ur lough bin, ituraliet Baal t 

entering the military service . . . 
i resign,.- '..'■ rem the Par. 

Tha pereoanel > lice tarn &ate< iugh Epp ch 3 Lngery ••. 

. . : S-4 ■ •,' ! .. ei ... 

, as per his letter - ..... 2? v L 

1954. 

Interpret . ryicc:, 

trvices wai 

: : . . . ttted at . ' • ■ 

loving September 1, 1933. The progs 
to Visitor Co . 
September the ev 

..amber 'Cental ....... 

September 13, 1958. ] oyo or Center: . 

September 2 >3, an: 

three t i wtek .'rota September 4 L , 

Lthful, Lre Progr. 
thro optember L8, . le Co a ail 

through September 25, 1938. n 
the .» Clerx - .rail van remcr 

cember I, . The Auto Caravan vriiich toured the Upper 
races was iptember 2, 1958. errece Tour , 

dis<: tember 8, 1953, am .;e Pro, 

Member 9, 195 



The Maaiaoth Visitor Cent- 3:00 a.m. t< X 

1:00 p.m. to 5: nbar 

\~ '.enter eui<> . .. tor vere closed 

.->toraber 10, I . 
time at these two locat u tor 

shutter - vers od epteiaber . i at 

.he shutteri; *.*er p temper 

1958. 

0a I . a :uber , rl iatttl 

conducted a group i a rep. . 

tO< :■:.:'. ENTOOt ,^r^.;,:; oa A trip 
o the party xjera Mr, Ralph 

coula, Montana; Huseyi . 
Srcc y rkoy. 



)i eptembar 14, 1933 Ca Pari ■.. 

■ *r. Akira Si* ; s ftila ?olcanologist ^:or '. 

Mr. .- • ■- a Bppex 

14th o :«-j.u>er - to the Geycer M saber - 

to eh . | •■ 

> • camber, 195 • two real no! pict 

to member ~ of the 

i </.-,-. Mil* reyaau • - . >.&. 

The pletvxos were bla 

dlsappointraent to many who attended. 3 the 
Basins along the ?-rehole River ) ip t ember 15, 1 
^reatad to • paaorasu of Gajraei 
• tors . dr. c ■- - 
the begi 
obtr ; c a i -hem.) 



• ' rser 
Vhits Dost Qoyeor 

Grand 



a .\ 
Grotto ■ . .■ i 

.;....■.. .. I . 



In addition to those th* dy Geyser, Sevnili 

. lieau ' ro seen . i j 

•to enough to see Wl Constant ~2yser„ 

Oojsor, and Behii ay.:e ; :. ail - . .or 

days of the year sofaras being or 

Gey: rr. La time to observe the begl their err- 

Mr. Suva was duly impre ;:*ed by the I • itaat - 1: iplay o raa 

beauty . 

- .. 



, »eua Curator, entered 
lasve-vithout-pay o tpt juber ir a 



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4MMi 



per. Uime i • 7 oo.\t iuc Jr s 

. -irate degree s^.t the U.viver ... 

hopes to haw* I - - ■■■"•■ . 

late weather, 

.amber 22, 13.33, the Birdie i 1#g 

;fez Perce Indian naterlelf were returned to lit. Otto . 
Chief " ^.ager, the owner of th 

a loan be; the Park here at ftaanoth V.: U 

the early 1930 *s. Setae arrowheads v»<ere a rom thi 

m t . Borwn accepted the Collect 

A . report w*i :;ed to the / i .Liva 

»r, rev ding a ceoplet art 

have acce. .on .rod a in ex 

i rep o r t nee .-'^aber 58. 

Che Lake i ■ •• latura 

obtained a aooee skull a h been co --- 

Trail Creel along the e aitheast 
skull occellent . . , , 

leton .; i. . > tal Park, -..■ pha 

. ,er 23, . ^<d thi si al I and < . .. •: 

able heuld they want the 

■.... ■■• ttenber JJ tt ra : c ) ghi :o r ■ i ■ 

two large ;aw trot . lie 

and Wildlife Service in 

a half f»ou it teen i 

pOU V ; 

whether or not i 

0a September 26 Pa 

list Seal iround the 

••..., . i inter ea or th 

teraiai.ug ^mprovemaats Which night be Bade ! 

The m l structure lyon, 

i uwth, ■ id re treat - % ;.. 

preaervafc -ve, and the seat e 

The grizzly bear family 
Yellowstone 
pm by Park Natural tt. Pari relist 

t Cortu . acted mate: .;ed in pro 

tural setti - .lay case. The 

be arranged and rly ) £ober. 



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Park Haturalist Beal v 
ikilgorc, Idaho o was the site 

the engager* 

/arcc Camp* . It it presently be 

aectloa with the iig lloL 

by Idaho Collage under a . 

letiooel f t arvle*. 

tawber 7,1'. 
Mount Washburn. Chi that occ 
ilor . *re three ewe^ . ■ 

Also o -ir 7, 

..: -out Creek Duup with ir. J 

Lton . Thirty one grisaly bear: 
eleven were this year - , v« were very iar at tie- 
red «ales. 

During the neat i 

yp lill, m .Lee, c. John ' ix 

ccr • M ■ other Lnforiaation 

•:. . . . September 3, 18, ; '.■ . 

29, ita these men. A special 

pointed £or the 

Yellow* tea . .1 Pari- tould b 

and a - tt ilna*\w 

. L958. > Chains 

saerabers Fran:. I. lattson, £ ty Row*; ... .. loleman, Leroy 
braadt, and Da 
ted upon a number ralal to . ' 

..rial letter I red to (r. strict Sagi i . 

the United States Geo"'. ey. 

1 i the a - ,. r 16, IS 

the Rabbit Croak Duxop where . y bear were 

3n this saoe evening a survey was sum . leterm i the 

distribution ol: bugl EH: 

were found bugl 
Junction, G. » Slk Park, .■;-. learvr. 

....■-•.- 
ctivJ-i a ribut 

mt thiii who! 

The Trumpeter 

Yellowstone River throughou the month. 
cad Float 



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. vaeaaot: » Ch Pari 

Statural . j v eptember 29 to all employee. ujpes that 

bar of Hissing books might be recovered ior tv. iry. 

The Yellowstone Library an etien r< 

_hov dg: 

Bookr purchased ia September 
. .. loaaad nt .rsouol u. 
Pamphlets entered during 7 

Pamphi; 10 

.'' : September 3, 19 . :> . rl tura 
book sales material & tl .^eea handled , ■ ■ i . .„.■ ran - 

. emat . tm Iota] Eh season at th Loci 

$162.90. 

■eptember 13, 1958 book sales ware close* c as 
., vridge. They warn eioaed out at 
>8, at mitmlier 10, L958, and a;, J -. .>.; 

September 25, L958. The .iastaotu Salei &e< iperata 
the entire mouth of September 1958. 

.-.ale;: for the calendar yeai , 

% 0, 1958 are $ '.77 a.> ee itra ited the total 

i *dar year : . La the amount a , . 

274*61. I I part t will 

■ale* during the remainder o': tba year, b .■--• 

about 3Z fttm teat year. A Largi this 1 due to 

our so. t -pedaling book sales at . ul Geyaer Cone this ye&r. 

The Old Fait'- .ale; were down $1,372. ran las tear year. 

re, Luciie Wagner was employed by the associat 
Librarian uat tember 24, I the ter 

Hrsi Sertha Kehrtoa was employed tiro aceaber 

>ok Cieri . 

poent and Supplies 

-ptember G, 1958 the Dodg« He. L2G 

iuraeu i rage. Lixui ig to uce the 

pickup, lio. &2"t ., at . i^aoth. 

...'tember 9, 19 
removed the speakers and other audio-visual cqu ;•. 









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:re&. • member . , 
<...:;, remov . . 

cor Center aiga • St 
--eon there, ware covered with Oi 
1958. 

The storehcx.:. 
month o; September, i m r ' Co bring it up to 

Bur 
Crota the 3torehou tes three 

Photograph-ic and Visual k 

The £ire whieb de-.troye< .^ 

■11 on Capteiober 3 5 

P ■ leal ea ■■■ ■ . 

here by fatieval Park -"-or; Fhol 

have beei auwber i -led to our >-. 

Six SxlC ;; .> . ..- .ur i-r.- • 

Camp fire Re -enactment vere seat to t& 
mi Septoefoor ", 

Eight 3x10 ^lo-ouy en] : 
.-.. subjocti are sent to A. A. . .. ' . i . 

him in ■ •» . 

Picture^ ef preeentetio or4* to employees 

taken at a special taeo 
1958. Ten 8x10 glossy enlarges* 
plied to Management. i 

bieedout enlaraewent . Ui- 

t indent 

Orders were sent out to .' >loe IMc 

ipt ember 15, 10 . 
Don Payne, .' joteraJx 

for •'-. des - one i »1 cats each - Tor Suge x :. 

! Pork Matural t at • 

. 



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copy to 



file 
museum 
reading file 



DCondontajh 






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